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  3. The Extremes of Conformation Theme has been discussed at the Dog Health Workshops held in 2012, 2015, 2017 and 2019. This document provides a timeline-based group of resources available on DogWellNet including articles, blogs and links to plenary presentations from the workshops. brachy - extremes theme - dwn - idhw - 1-4 - timeline.pdf During the past decade a great deal has been accomplished to address health and welfare issues that relate to conformation extremes across breeds. Particular focus has been paid to health challenges present in the short muzzled breeds, several of which have become exceedingly popular in recent years. Efforts have included scientific research, Kennel and Breed Club educational programs, involvements by veterinary associations located throughout the world and governmental approaches to regulating breeds provide an informed view of how extremes can impact health and welfare of dogs - views come from different stakeholder groups. We at DWN are pleased to be a part of sharing information from the Dog Health Workshops as well as other collected resources with the community.
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  5. The severity of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) is assessed by means of walk tests. With the help of walk tests, individuals with the most severe symptoms can be eliminated from breeding.
  6. For some time, pet obesity has been recognized as a crucial, widespread issue that impacts the health, welfare, and lifespan of dogs. Earlier in 2019, following the 4th IDHW, IPFD endorsed the Global Pet Obesity Initiative Position Statement, joining 24 International Veterinary Professional Organizations, including the American Veterinary Medical Association Board of Directors, British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, World Small Animal Veterinary Association, among others. Pet obesity is a studied health and welfare issue that is, presumably, quite straightforward... and under control of owners to fix. However, as for issues around human obesity, in reality the situation can be more complicated; and recent studies have examined some of the complexities, for people and their pets. An IPFD collaborator, Prof. Peter Sandoe (University of Copenhagen), and others published a paper in 2014 on Canine and feline obesity: A One Health perspective that offers a broad coverage of the problem, why it is important, how the Human-Animal Bond impacts challenges, and, importantly, "Why we should care". From the article: "Recent years have seen a drastic increase in the rates of overweight and obesity among people living in some developed nations. There has also been increased concern over obesity in companion animals. In the latest article in Veterinary Record's series on One Health, Peter Sandøe and colleagues argue that the relationship between obesity in people and in companion animals is closer and more complex than previously thought, and that obesity should be treated as a One Health problem." Below, under Recent Research you will find articles that address specific challenges, including perception of obesity and inaccurate assessment of body conditions score (as a measure of obesity). The evolution of obesity: from evolutionary advantage to a disease describes the historical perspectives and the current situation: "Obesity as a disease was first described by Hippocrates" ... and ... "in 1920’s the Insurance Companies, in 1948 World Health Organisation and in 2013 both American Medical Association and The American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology and The Obesity Society recognized obesity as a disease." As described above, this approach has also been taken in the veterinary world. These acknowledgements are made with the goal of facilitating treatment, promoting research, and with an aim to curb this growing health and public health problem. Obesity can cause or worsen many health conditions, and the risk is enhanced for certain breeds and types of pets. Brachycephalic (flat-faced pets), already challenged in terms of respiratory function and heat regulation, are further compromised if overweight. This can be viewed as not only a health problem, but also as a welfare problem - but many owners remain unaware. See, e.g. Owners' perception of 'responsible dog ownership in our Blogs section. Veterinarians can offer clients sound advice for management of their pet to optimize health. Here, we'll feature work done by IPFD's collaborators as well as provide links to industry reports, research and educational tool kits which have been developed to assist owners and veterinary practices. Check out articles, surveys and other important info at the Global Pet Obesity Initiative's website + see the 2019 Pet Owner Survey - An opportunity to contribute! US Residents: would you like to participate in ongoing research into obesity? The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention is conducting the 12th Annual National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Survey This survey was opened to US residents on October 9, 2019. To participate, sign up here. Veterinary practice/clinic participation in this organization's 2020 pet weight data collection survey next October is sought as well.
  7. From - Standards, Health and Genetics in Dogs - Chapter II - Genetic testing in dogs - Marie Abitbol (France) "The first part of this chapter presents the genetic characteristics of the canine species and the basics of canine genetics. The second part addresses the use of screening and diagnostic tests for inherited diseases, with a focus on genetic counselling and the parameters that determine the interpretation of test results. The third part concentrates on the search for informations on canine inherited diseases and the tests available. The final part presents tests for aesthetic characteristics such as coat colour."
  8. Jerold S Bell DVM (jerold.bell@tufts.edu) Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University presented this article at the 2019 AKC Canine Health Foundation National Parent Club Canine Health Conference. The article has been reprinted here with the written permission of the author.
  9. Thanks Clement. We will check it out. Please feel free to send any information you think should be included in the Breed Database to Ann Milligan, our content manager
  10. There is a new (international) breed club in The Netherlands: http://www.ierseroodwittesetterclub.nl/
  11. Th Kennel Club in the UK has posted information on a "New Dog Breeding Regulation". This relates to regulations from the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) for breeding operations and related to members of The KC Assured Breeders Scheme. "Changes to breeding regulations in England New regulations on dog breeding in England will be live from 1st October. There are no changes to breeding regulations in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. A number of significant changes are being made," which include requirements for a dog breeding licence. In addition, there is a defining of minimum welfare standards. "Risk rating Alongside welfare, the breeder’s compliance history will also be assessed, to determine whether the breeder is either a low risk or high risk operator, i.e. whether it should be expected the breeder will maintain their standards for the duration of their licence period." And DEFRA has a matrix to assess risk. And you can also download the notice by the Kennel Club. UK dog breeding regulation.pdf Information on the Assured Breeder Scheme requirements and recommendations here.
  12. In September 2019 the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) posted several videos on YouTube... below we highlight several. These presentations are substantive in their coverage of the topics with a focus on improving health and welfare of dogs. The audience for these presentations is veterinarians, although dog breeders and breed club health managers can certainly benefit from viewing/sharing this content as well.
  13. It is my hope that IPFD will become the global presence and central repository for information on breeding healthy canines.  The mission is so important and so large that it will require the financial support of institutional backers and supporters.  Please join the IPFD and help work toward this goal.  Consider becoming a benefactor to this most worthy cause.  Or if you are familiar with corporate entities that would be suitable as partners with the IPFD, consider asking them to contribute long-term financial support to the IPFD.  My breed happens to be the Black Russian Terrier (BRT) (we have 4!) and here is our favorite quote about the BRT.  He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, and his leader.  He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart.  You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.”  Regardless of your breed, lets's all try to be worthy of our essential canine companions.  They do so deserve our very best efforts.  The IPFD is an ideal organizational steward for this important global mission.  See what all the IPFD has to offer and get involved today.  All The Best My Friends!

    Dave

  14. This background and development explanation does an excellent job of bringing the reader up to speed in a clear and concise manner. It also sets the stage for what is sure to be a bright future for a very important global hub of coordination. The IPFD is promoting the very best tenets and tools for canines around the world. I hope that some philanthropic organizations who have profited so much from the canine industry will give back in the direction of the IPFD. All The Best IPFD and DogWellNet!
  15. In 2018, our fourth full year of operation, we focused our efforts on key initiatives, including: Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD); planning for the 4th International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW) in May 2019; and lending an independent voice in addressing complex and often controversial challenges, such as the health and welfare issues in brachycephalic breeds.
  16. Hello again Dr. Bonnett, I took your splendid advice and explored what the UK Irish Wolfhound organization is doing. I must say they are (in so far as I am familiar with these things) quite an outstanding benchmark in their efforts. I personally have seen none better. This includes not only their health testing, historical records collection efforts, and health research initiatives, but even the very content and usability of their web site/presence. Most of the rest of us would do well to emulate their efforts! It is my hope that we in the U.S. Black Russian Terrier Club of America (www.brtca.com) can advance our efforts in a similar manner. We have a lot of catching up to do and it is so encouraging to have their organization as a model after which we can pattern and fast track our own efforts. Many thanks to the Irish Wolfhound folks for standing up..., doing what needed to be done in such an outstanding and organized manner..., and sharing it with the rest of us..., so that we can move forward with our own breed enhancement efforts. As with the Irish Wolfhound and many other breeds, the BRT is so very deserving of our best efforts! FAVORITE QUOTE: About the Black Russian Terrier: “He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, and his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.” What a wonderful sentiment, which I am sure applies to nearly every breed. After all they do for us, we owe them nothing but the very best. Thank You Dr. Bonnett and Thank You to the UK Irish Wolfhound Organization for your outstanding leadership. Respectfully Submitted, Dave Eikelberg deikelberg@gmail.com
  17. Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) Project Director Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi was interviewed for a story on at-home Dog DNA tests.
  18. Thanks for the comment David. In general, we are in support of international data collection. Quite a few kennel clubs are building health and pedigree-linked databases, some of which are publicly available. The concept of OFA as a register is encouraging. As with all these efforts, many side issues arise, including data quality on identification of the dog and parents, quality and relevance of DNA test results and many more. IPFD with our collaborators and via the International Dog Health Workshops continues to support and promote these efforts, as well as international collaboration, sharing and transparency, In terms of an international breed database, again, great resource. If you have not yet seen it, please check out the Irish Wolfhound Database. They are doing an amazing job in all aspects. Maura Lyons and Per-Arne Flatberg presented on this resource at the 4th IDHW and you can see all posters here. And Per-Arne's presentation can be downloaded here. Also know that you can message them via DogWellNet.com. We also are built on the foundation of community engagement, so absolutely great to have people like you weighing in. Please share links, data and descriptions, any time, with our Content Manager Ann Milligan. Thanks!
  19. Here in the U.S., our club, the Black Russian Terrier Club of America (www.brtca.org) has elected to team with www.embarkvet.com to offer a battery of genetic testing through a single sample submission for $99.00, if purchased through our club website. The price for the battery of testing is normally $140.00 I believe. This group rate and bundled testing will be beneficial to our members and their breeding decisions and be possible at a price most breeders can afford. It also replaces multiple tests from other labs that collectively cost two or three times as much. Regardless of what testing lab breeders use, we are also hoping that people from all over the world will want to have their canine's test results logged with www.ofa.org so that we can all have one single, effective, globally accessible central repository/database to deposit our information and from which to draw genetic data for breeding decision-making. If we could get global participation, what a fantastic resource this would be to improve the lives of every breed in a great many parts of the world. An initiative is also in the planning phase for collection of all BRT medical, rearing, temperament, growth, environment, and any other records an owner is willing to archive. The records would be donated to a central collection point either during the BRTs life or postumously, scanned electronically, and kept for future research. At the first 5 year point and consecutive 5-year increments thereafter, a research grant would be available for a veterinarian university or similar group/researcher to correlate the data in an effort to determine what effects beyond genetics are produced in BRTs as a result of the way they were whelped, raised, given health care, trained, exercised, fed, medicated, etc. I was wondering what your organization's thoughts on these initiatives might be? Kindest Regards, Dave Eikelberg, deikelberg@gmail.com
  20. Here we are pleased to present a Chapter from the Book - Standards, Health and Genetics in Dogs/Standards, Santé et Génétique chez le Chien GUINTARD C. and LEROY G. [Dir.], Standards, Health and Genetics in Dogs / Standards, santé et génétique chez le Chien /, FCI-SCC-SKK ed., 2017, ISBN : 9 782746 696730, 400 p. Relationships between genetics, breeding practices and health in dogs - Grégoire Leroy (France) English and French versions are available.
  21. AKC-CHF: VetVine Dr. Emily Bray, PhD discusses what we know regarding the association between maternal style and offspring behavior, temperament, cognition, and later success as a working dog.
  22. IPFD has endorsed the Global Pet Obesity Initiative Position Statement, joining 24 International Veterinary Professional Organizations, including the American Veterinary Medical Association Board of Directors, British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, World Small Animal Veterinary Association, and others.
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