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  1. Yesterday
  2. This content is now here https://dogwellnet.com/ipfd/who-we-are/leadership/
  3. Here we compile a list of media stories and articles posted by IPFD Partners and other contributors helping to spread the word on IPFD's Call for Collective Actions for Health and Welfare of Pedigree Dogs.
  4. Last week
  5. Our Dogs Newspaper: IPFD and our Call for Collective Actions for Dog Health and Welfare Our Dogs Newsletter is a respected and highly subscribed information source, especially for the dog show community, in the UK and around the world. Our Dogs is a subscription-only site, however, articles can be purchased. We are pleased and grateful that they have not only shared our Reframing Current Challenges Around Pedigree Dogs A Call for Respectful Dialogue, Collaboration, and Collective Actions document, but they have also published an editorial as well as an article by
  6. Earlier
  7. 19 Oct 2020 If you’re a dog owner, or looking for a puppy what does it REALLY mean when a dog is “genetically tested”? “My dog is genetically tested” is an increasingly common statement from dog owners. We see it on breeder’s webpages as part of advertising puppies, or as information on the dam/sire… it’s common on social media as a point of pride or a mark of care and responsibility by owners… but what does genetically tested (or DNA tested) actually mean? While using genetic testing as part of pre-breeding testing is a really valuable tool, a genetically tested dog is not, in itse
  8. Collecting and utilizing phenotypic data to minimize disease: A breeder’s practical guide Author: Rhonda Hoven OFA publication. (2003) While DNA / Genetic tests are becoming increasingly important in management of breeding dogs, it is important to recognize... "DNA tests are not available for the majority of common canine diseases. Most tests intended to offer breeders health information about a dog’s suitability for breeding, rely instead on an evaluation of the dog’s physical status at the time of examination. These are called phenotypic tests, and include evaluations fo
  9. Here we compile a list of media stories and articles posted by IPFD Partners and other contributors helping to spread the word on IPFD's Call for Collective Actions for Health and Welfare of Pedigree Dogs. View the original IPFD Press Release (available in several languages). Please share it through your website and social media channels if you haven't done so already! Note: We will continue adding content below as the conversation grows.
  10. Keep writing; keep it up. I read all your articles and all have given a lot of information, Thank you so much for sharing these articles. DNA Test Online
  11. Get a GRIHP! on Salukis This article on Salukis is part of a series to highlight the Big Picture of health, welfare and breeding and to help develop Globally Relevant Integrated Health Profiles (GRIHPs) for many breeds. See IPFD's Get a GRIHP! on Breed Health Initiative. PLEASE NOTE: This installment is just the beginning...we will add further statistics and information as they become available.
  12. In This Issue: News & Highlights Reframing Current Challenges Around Pedigree Dogs A Call for Respectful Dialogue, Collaboration, and Collective Actions Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  13. Press Release: International Partnership for Dogs Calls for Collective Actions for Health and Welfare of Pedigree Dogs This Press Release is available in Nederlands, English, Suomeksi, Français, Deutsch, and Español (download below). The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) is calling on stakeholder groups – including dog show enthusiasts, kennel and breed clubs, legislators, dog owners, veterinarians, welfare advocates – from all regions and countries to come together to address issues currently impacting the health, welfare, and breeding of dogs.
  14. This week is the anniversary of the First International Conference on Human Behaviour Change for Animal Welfare that took place in the UK 2016. All the talks are on their YouTube channel. See our article following the Conference. I was honoured to give a presentation - and in that process to learn about the knowledge, methodology, and tools available from human behaviour change theory and practice to help us. My talk is posted on the HBC's YouTube channel under the title: How Beliefs and Attitudes about Dog Health and Welfare Limit Behaviour Change. In fact, the enti
  15. Come for the looks, stay for the personality? A mixed methods investigation of reacquisition and owner recommendation of Bulldogs, French Bulldogs, and Pugs ...is the latest analysis of data collected and reported on in a 2019 study - see - Great expectations, inconvenient truths, and the paradoxes of the dog-owner relationship for owners of brachycephalic dogs. As we said in that blog: "Popularity of brachycephalic (flat-faced) dog breeds is increasing internationally despite well-documented intrinsic health and welfare problems associated with their conformation." The previous study lo
  16. Finnish Investigation: Improving the implementation of animal welfare legislation in animal breeding Part II: Preliminary analysis of problems and means of intervention in the breeding of dogs Officially published in Finnish; unofficially translated to English. This investigation underpins the Finnish report: An investigation would curb problems with dog breeding through monitoring criteria and ethical delegation. (That link contains a translated Summary of the report written by the Finnish Food Authority as well as link to Kirsi Saino's Commentary, IT MUST BE POSSIBLE TO PROMO
  17. Reframing Current Challenges Around Pedigree Dogs A Call for Respectful Dialogue, Collaboration, and Collective Actions For all those who want a sustainable future for healthy pedigree dogs. Author: Brenda N. Bonnett, DVM, PhD, CEO, International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) Note: This article is available in Nederlands, English, Suomeksi, Français, Deutsch, and Español (download below).
  18. IPFD's genetic testing resources are mentioned in media stories on international research that has documented the molecular basis of the Australian Labradoodle. Their main conclusion is that animals in the Australian Labradoodle breed registry are mostly poodle, and not a 50-50 split as might have been expected.
  19. Think Globally, Act Locally - Promoting Open Dialogue and Collective Actions Our world is better because we share it with dogs. Let's share responsibly! IPFD has published an article (and done a Press Release) entitled: Reframing Current Challenges Around Pedigree Dogs: A Call for Respectful Dialogue, Collaboration and Collective Actions (see more below). This article aims to build on the call to action in that publication, with further resources and suggestions on moving forward, and eventually to direct stakeholders to tools to help us pursue individual and collective
  20. In our very small population of the Black Russian Terrier, we have adopted a policy of "working in a positive direction" and trying our very best to educate anyone who will listen, in intelligent genetic sorting for breeding pairs, using the best we have while at teh same time striving for the maximum genetic diversity possible as well a requisite traits and attributes. Where our breeders have gone awry, we attempt to correct the situation through judge's education seminars and articles in our newsletters, as well as just plain talk on social media. Not ideal but it is our hope that the trem
  21. At first blush, it may be easier to do this under the proposed system in Finland, than in, say, the Netherlands. There the restrictions are such that, for some breeds, seemingly no dogs will qualify.
  22. Perhaps funding a commission established specifically for selecting mating pairs with the goal of bringing back healthier physical attributes is in order.
  23. Our collaborators at Four Paws have been developing their 'Model Solution for full traceability across the EU online puppy trade' for some years and are actively enacting this work throughout Europe. This work was also presented as part of the Supply and Demand Theme at the IPFD 4th International Dog Health workshop. Four Paws about traceability: "The illegal puppy trade is rife with animal cruelty and deception. Every year, countless puppies are bred in deplorable conditions, taken from their mothers too early and transported across Europe to be sold online via classified ad
  24. Finnish report: An investigation would curb problems with dog breeding through monitoring criteria and ethical delegation As we have been reporting, there is a surge of regulatory efforts to address concerns about the health and welfare of pedigreed dogs, especially brachycephalic breeds, in several countries. The potential impact on not only dog breeders and pedigreed dog organizations, but also on dog owners and even veterinarians may be considerable, as well as on many stakeholders in the pet industry. It is apparent that some of these efforts are proceeding unilaterally rather than c
  25. This year has been challenging for all organizations globally. However, IPFD has fared well. We have always been a ‘virtual’-based operation, with all consultants working from home. Building on our 2019 Annual Report: A Growing Voice, this milestones document is meant to update our Partners and Sponsors on our activities to date in 2020. – Dr. Brenda Bonnett, CEO (click to download/share as a PDF): IPFD Milestones 2020 August 2020.pdf Message from the Canadian Kennel Club: “CKC’s membership in the International Partnership for Dogs, and participation in the biennial
  26. Given the decline in kennel club membership in many nations, it is important to reach out to the pet owning public directly and not to use breed clubs as proxies. This is especially true with regard to cross breeds, which are regarded with distain by most kennel clubs, and pose challenges to the breed specific framework that seems to be emerging in genetic testing.
  27. The Kennel Club has hosted a unique webcast to discuss brachycephalic health and what can be done collaboratively to ensure a healthier future for dogs. Chaired by Kennel Club Chairman, Tony Allcock OBE, the webcast panel comprised Dr Jane Ladlow, European and Royal College Specialist in Small Animal Surgery and leading BOAS researcher; Bill Lambert, Head of Health and Welfare at the Kennel Club; and Charlotte McNamara, Health and Welfare Development Manager at the Kennel Club. The panel discussed brachycephalic health, approaches across Europe, the need for a collaborative, evidence-based app
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