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  3. Effective approaches to managing dogs in society involves many stakeholders (dog breeders, dog owners, puppy buyers and governmental agencies as well as private businesses and cynological organizations). Education is a key component of managing breeds and individual dogs to optimize society's involvement with them. DWN is pleased to partner and collaborate with Kennel clubs and their affiliated breed clubs, veterinarians, researchers and canine experts who work tirelessly to provide insights and perspectives. We thank our collaborators for creating public education resources to support responsible dog ownership and to define sound, ethical breeding practices that improve human interactions and involvements with dogs. AVMA position statement Excerpt... " The issue of dangerous dogs, dog bites and public safety is a complex one. Any dog can bite, regardless of its breed. It is the dog's individual history, behavior, general size, number of dogs involved, and the vulnerability of the person bitten that determines the likelihood of biting and whether a dog will cause a serious bite injury. Breed-specific bans are a simplistic answer to a far more complex social problem, and they have the potential to divert attention and resources from more effective approaches. " Hearings in the UK on June 13, 2018 shed light on the effectiveness of breed-specific legislation. Witnesses: Dr Rachel Casey, Director of Canine Behaviour and Research, Dogs Trust, Robin Hargreaves, former President, British Veterinary Association, Bill Lambert, Health and Breeder Services Manager, Kennel Club, and David Ryan, former Chair, Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors. Witnesses: Trevor Cooper, Doglaw Consultant for Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, Dr Samantha Gaines, Head of Companion Animals Department, RSPCA, and Steve Goody, Deputy Chief Executive, Blue Cross
  4. Tom Lewis from The Kennel Club discusses 4 forces that impact dog populations/pedigreed dog breeds: mutation, selection, loss of genetic diversity and out crossing.
  5. Ann Milligan

    Love is Blind - Dr Philip Moses

    Australian Veterinary Association - Specialist surgeon, Adjunct Professor Philip Moses, provides some words of advice for the veterinary profession about how to best tackle the welfare problems of dogs with exaggerated features. See more content at AVA's Love is Blind campaign.
  6. Ann Milligan

    HGTD - Introduction to Search by Lab

    Search for a Genetic Test provider / Lab by country. Find out general information on the lab (website, address, phone), contact information, quality assurance indicators and genetic tests offered. Go to the HGTD Search by Lab / Test Provider.
  7. The search function offered here allows you to enter terms used to describe heritable diseases for which DNA tests are currently available. Breed-specific DNA tests and/or DNA tests applicable to all breeds are available in the HGTD database. Go to the HGTD Search by Test / Disease.
  8. HGTD - A quick look at the Search by Breed functionality. Go to the Harmonization of Genetic testing Search by Breed
  9. The Society for the Promotion of Applied Research in Canine Science (SPARCS) is a non-profit organization now maintained by The National Canine Research Council, created to bridge the gap between canine science and dog lovers by providing an international platform where modern animal behavior science can be presented, discussed, and debated by the greatest minds in canine science. SPARCS hosts an international conference where speakers give in-depth presentations pertaining to questions about dog behavior, welfare, and key issues the world faces in the human-canine bond. SPARCS Video Library - See all presentations Conference Presentations 2018
  10. "More information: https://www.vet.cam.ac.uk/boas/about-... The French bulldog, bulldog, pug, pekingese, shih tzu, Japanese chin, boxer and Boston terrier are all examples of brachycephalic breeds. The most distinctive feature of these breeds is their short muzzle. Brachycephalic dogs have been bred for centuries to possess a normal-sized lower jaw, and a disproportionately shorter upper jaw. In recent decades, breeding selection for extreme brachycephalic features has resulted in dogs that are predisposed to upper airway tract obstruction and subsequent respiratory distress, among several other health issues. Although not all brachycephalic dogs suffer clinical signs, the incidence and severity of the respiratory disorders has increased. The respiratory disease related to brachycephalic confirmation is called brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS)." Also see: U of Cambridge's BOAS NEWS page for a timeline. Extremes of Conformation: DWN Resources
  11. BPH - English PDF - Behavior and Personality Assessment in Dogs, BPH BPH is a behavioral assessment that has been created with the aim to contribute to better knowledge about the mentality and personality of dogs, all dogs. It should be helpful for breed clubs, breeders and dog owners to have a tool which helps to describe the personality of the dog, whether it is a potential breeding animal, pet or working dog.
  12. "In this Canine Health Foundation webinar Dr. Danika Bannasch, DVM, PhD University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, discusses the major advances that have been made in our understanding of the molecular basis for inherited diseases in dogs. These advances, in the form of DNA based tests for breeding animals have changed that way breeders make breeding decisions. During the webinar Dr. Bannasch will discuss the basics of dog genetics, the different modes of inheritance or how genetic traits and diseases are transmitted from one generation to the next and the exceptions to the basic modes of inheritance."
  13. "Elaine Ostrander provides an overview of canine genetics, and explains how scientists are using genetics to decipher the molecular basis of different traits such as height and cancer risk. Talk Overview: Although all domestic dogs belong to the same species, different breeds display unique morphological traits and different disease susceptibility. Dr. Elaine Ostrander provides an overview of canine genetics, and explains how scientists are using genetics to decipher the molecular basis of different traits such as height and cancer risk. In her second lecture, Ostrander explains that canine genetics can be used to understand disease susceptibility and cancer risk. By analyzing the pedigree of dogs, her laboratory identified a series of genes involved in the elevated cancer risk of particular dog breeds. Specifically, her laboratory studied invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, a disease for which breeds like Scottish Terriers have a high susceptibility. In human cases of this disease, the cause is unknown in 50% of patients. Ostrander’s laboratory identified genetic mutations that explain the elevated cancer risk in these dogs. This information may improve diagnosis and targeted therapy in dogs and humans..." See related article for research: Genomic Analyses Reveal the Influence of Geographic Origin, Migration, and Hybridization on Modern Dog Breed Development.
  14. Breeding healthy dogs Professor Brenda Bonnett talks about the use of breed specific insurance statistics for breeders, breed clubs, veterinarians and other stake holders. Avl av friske hunder Professor Brenda Bonnett's foredrag om bruken av rasespesifikk forsikringsstatistikk i avlsarbeidet. Foredraget henvender seg til oppdrettere, raseklubber, veterinærer og andre interessenter. Also see: Breeds with summaries of Swedish KC, Finnish KC or Norwegian KC Breeding Strategies (RAS|JTO) Swedish insurance data
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  16. Peter Muir, Professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, explains the genome-wide association study (GWAS) which analyzes canine disease. Muir explores the parallels of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in dogs and humans. Explore the full archive of WPT's University Place lectures online at http://wpt.org/universityplace
  17. VetVine Hub Uploaded on Dec 9, 2017 The increasing availability of genetic screening tests, DNA tests, and now multiplex test panels also requires an understanding of what the tests tell you.
  18. Early socialization practices and adult dog behavior – Video abstract Video abstract of a review paper “Puppy parties and beyond: the role of early age socialization practices on adult dog behavior” published in the open access journal Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports by Howell TJ, King T, Bennett PC. See... DWN's article "Puppy Parties and Socialization" for a link to the paper. Also see DWN's Behaviour & Welfare Resources Category
  19. From the First International Conference on Human Behaviour Change for Animal Welfare Richard Casey: Using PetWise MOTs to Improve Animal Welfare What are PetWise Mots? https://www.pdsa.org.uk/education-centre/petwise-mot/what-are-petwise-mots Also see: Kelly Arthur's Blog post, Welfare Consultations to Improve Pet Wellbeing and Generate Revenue
  20. See Dr. Brenda Bonnett's presentation from the First International Conference on Human Behaviour Change for Animal Welfare. HBCAW website: www.hbcanimalwelfare.com All presentations from the conference are available from HBCAW's YouTube channel. Also see DWN's Human Dog Interactions Category.
  21. Making Assessments of Dogs' Respiration has been produced by the Swedish Kennel Club as part of the work in improving health in pedigree dogs. The film illustrates the causes and background to dogs' respiratory problems and the difficulties to adjust the body temperature. The film discusses the signs of affected breathing that a judge may observe. (English subtitled) Making Assessments of Dogs' Respiration is a complement to the Breed-Specific Instructions for Judges, BSI. Also see: The Breed-Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges (BSI) The Swedish Kennel Club's Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) Programme
  22. IKFB: French Bulldog Club (Germany) - Walking test for French Bulldog, Pugs and English Bulldogs Also see: DWN's article on the IKFB - Dr. Anne Posthoff, the president of the German International Club for French Bulldogs, explains why the rules for breeding French Bulldogs in Germany are amongst the strictest in the world. Hot Topics - Brachycephalics, archive - DWN and Extremes of Conformation - Brachycephalics
  23. Ann Milligan

    Brachycephalic Airway Disease

    Kyle Snowden, DVM, provides information on brachycephalic anatomy and discusses its impacts on breathing and thermo-regulation. Veterinary interventions used to correct problematic issues in compromised dogs are covered. Also see: DWN's International Actions: Extremes of Conformation
  24. A tool to help dog owners, breeders and veterinarians...the HGTD is an online searchable database providing information on genetic tests available for dog breeds, information on the tests themselves and quality control measures used by genetic test providers participating in the HGTD. Search out tests, diseases (phenes), and labs. Find resources for genetic counselling.
  25. For more info see: IPFD Student Project 'B.A.R.K. | Bacterial Antimicrobial Resistance Knowledge' - Chronological Overview
  26. The great juggling act...Ask any long time dog breeder and they'll tell you, exploring the subject of dog breeding and looking at how to define 'best practices' that lead to production of healthy, functional dogs is getting more complicated by the day! A COMPLEX BALANCE: What are You Measuring? How do you define and verify successes or failures? Health status (current or long-term) is but one part of a breeder's evaluation of a dog's suitability for breeding. Assessing a dog's health and any other quality or characteristic goes hand-in-hand with the breeder's goals and reasons for breeding/keeping dogs. A breeder's evaluation of the dog's conformation/structure, breed type, temperament, personality, working ability and serviceability is combined with health considerations at the time of breeding and beyond. Juggling all the different 'balls' of whether a dog is to to be included or excluded from a breeding program, a pairing is likely to produce quality offspring or developing a workable breeding strategy for an entire breed is an extremely difficult task. Screening for hips, elbows, heart and eye examinations by veterinarians, expert evaluators, and a myriad of schemes developed to govern those types of non-dna evaluations have long been considered by health-conscious breeders as essential components of quality breeding programs. Enter the explosion of research on DNA and the dog genome - scientists are in the process of examining the genetic components of everything - health conditions and diseases, predispositions to manifest diseases, physical characteristics, longevity, genetic diversity, behaviours - in people, dogs and other species. DNA tests and direct to consumer sales of DNA tests has opened up a whole new world of 'evaluation tools' for dog breeders. Understanding genetic testing and applying results of tests to breeding decisions and management of individual dogs and breeds is clearly no simple matter. The science is relatively new - but its effects are already widespread - for the better in some cases - but challenges exist. For insights... Check out Finnish Kennel club Breeding Experts, Taina Nygård and Katariina Mäki's writeup, Gene tests for consumer advice
  27. The Finnish dog publication Koiramme profiles the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) initiative and ongoing efforts by the Nordic Kennel Union in a recent article on canine genetic testing.
  28. Both the article and your statement are very interesting, and I of course fully agree with the IPFD statement. There are two things I would like to underline. First, dog genomics tests goes much beyond health, we should consider also the ones on morphology, population genetics, and potentially behavior and work. Those tools have also clear potential interest for dog breeding, but require standardization as well, in term of approaches, metrics, marker set and so on. Second, it may be interesting to notice, that the growing role of those tools may put the current governance of dog breeding at stake at some point, with the role of laboratory going far beyond the simple role of supply of health test: for instance we could imagine pedigree tools being replaced by equivalent genomic ones at middle/long term.
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