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International Collaboration For Dog Health And Welfare. Join Us.

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    Royal Canin's Laureline Malineau's presentation given at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop. * Notes for this presentation are accessible from the top left corner of the pages - click on the forward arrow on the bottom left of page 6 for a film (Loïc Moutault, CEO Royal Canin).
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    This file is an expanded version of Per Arne Flatberg's presentation of the Irish Wolfhound Database shared at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop in the Breed-Specific Health Strategies Theme sessions. "Made for Health Strategies", this international, open-access database offers robust, state of the art tools and materials to the IW breed community. Also see DWN's Irish Wolfhound page.
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    Sarah Ross summarizes the heart of how supply/demand issues impact dog health and welfare in her presentation given at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop. Model solutions for legislation and enforcement are offered.
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    Jim Stephens' presentation at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop includes information on the puppy trade in Ireland - legislation and issues underlying production/supply/demand are covered.
  7. Ann Milligan

    Supply and Demand - Brenda Bonnett

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    Brenda Bonnett's presentation at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop introduces the complexities and impacts of the source of dogs.
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    Claire Wade's presentation from the 4th Dog Health Workshop covers researcher motivations and challenges in the field of genetic test development, validation, publication and communication - the presenter offers insights into the dog and researcher community's shared aims for use of genetic testing to enhance animal health and welfare.
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    IPFD's HGTD Project Director, Aimee Llewellyn-Zaide provides an overview of the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs initiative - challenges and aims of providing quality genetic testing information to the dog community.
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    Tamzin Furtado's presentation from the 4th International Dog Health Workshop considers how human behaviours affect welfare. "There are good reasons why we should better understand human behaviour: It’s the root cause of most welfare issues– people doing, or not doing, certain care, management or training practices. It can help campaigns and work with clients (vets, trainers) to improve compliance, rapport and efficiency. We are used to considering animal behaviour, what about the human animal?"
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    Åke Hedhammar's presentation from the 4th International Dog Health Workshop addresses management concerns of brachycephalic breeds... efforts to improve health / welfare... How to change the perception of a desired dog in these breeds How to implement changes in / interpretations of breed standards
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    A presentation at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop by Helena Skarp that provides an overview of the concept of breed including a discussion of 'breed' in relation to selection, conservation, preservation, genetic diversity and health.
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    A presentation given by Gregoire Leroy at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop that explores the concept of breeds and their management. "Breed is a central concept in dog breeding... "
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    “Get a GRIHP on Breed Health” - Breed Health Strategies Presentation given by Brenda Bonnett at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop. What’s a GRIHP? Globally Relevant Integrated Health Profile...
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    Breed Health Strategy Presentation by Ian Seath given at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop Lead > Plan > Engage > Improve
  16. The 4th International Dog Health Workshop - follow-up... Presentations from the workshop are available below and accessible in DogWellNet Downloads. Posters are available HERE. More presentations will be posted as they become available.
  17. Dave St. Louis

    4th IDHW Posters

    Please check back often as we add more posters from the 4th IDHW.
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  19. The European School for Advanced Veterinary Studies (ESAVS) is a non for profit organization registered in Luxemburg dedicated to the advancement of veterinary medicine for companion animals. ESAVS was founded in 1991 as a project in the frame of the European Union‘s COMETT II and LEONARDO DA VINCI programs. It is affiliated with the Faculty of Science, Technology and Communication at the University of Luxembourg.
  20. The "Study on the welfare of dogs and cats involved in commercial practices" identified five main areas of concern which could potentially place at risk the welfare and the health of dogs and cats. This report became available in 2015... the subject matters covered in the report remain topics of concern still today... May 2019, the Finnish Kennel Club's news... https://www.kennelliitto.fi/en/about-us/news/finnish-kennel-clubs-objectives-european-parliament-election "The Finnish Kennel Club’s objectives for the next mandate of the European Parliament promote responsible dog trade, improve the conditions for monitoring welfare of dogs and intensify the control of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases." Annexes to the "Study on the welfare of dogs and cats involved in commercial practices" contain data (ANNEX 3. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DATA: CASE STUDY MEMBER STATES).
  21. The Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) was mentioned in a recent story from WGME CBS 13 (Portland, ME)
  22. Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi

    Getting Started with Genetic Testing

    Jane - I really appreciate your passion and obvious commitment to canine health. Personally, I think we start by doing everything we can to build collaborations between all the stakeholders in canine health, and to do all we can to support and encourage those who are already motivated to make positive changes. Leading by good example, and working together is a very powerful start. Every country has different laws, resources, and challenges to improve dog health, but we are trying to start by sharing the experiences of many different groups from around the world in the hopes that we can all learn from each other, and adapt tools and resources that have found to work. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a one-size-fits-all approach, but we can share our successes (and failures) to help others with similar challenges. I would encourage you to look out for information after the upcoming 4th International Dog Health Workshop to see what projects are being undertaken, and information on progress since the last meeting.
  23. Jane  E EVANS

    Getting Started with Genetic Testing

    Thank you for making this information available to support breeders in their work and passion. Breeders are the working link between the sciences and the new born puppies so breeders need the best , most current yet digestible information to breed healthy puppies of that breed and above all DO NO HARM to that breed. This means breeders MUST HAVE USABLE EFFECTIVE TOOLS for their often life's work, to be successful in their selection not for a ribbon, a title or three, but for the breed they love as a whole. The great academic work being done is not always accessible to breeders or easily understood. Sometimes this does lead inadvertently to HARM. BRIDGING BODIES ARE ESSENTIAL TO ENSURE THE GOOD WORK IS NOT WASTED BUT PROVIDED IN THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO BREEDERS. CANINE BODIES ARE IN THE POSITION TO ACT RESPONSIBLY AND HUNT DOWN THE BEST & MOST CURRENT RESEARCHED INFORMATION , PROVIDE IT FREELY TO THEIR BREEDERS, JUDGES & ALL THOSE WHO INFLUENCE THE DIRECTION OF BREEDS. OVERSEEING BODIES WHOSE DOCUMENTATION SUPPOSEDLY "CERTIFIES" THE PUREBRED STATUS AND LINEAGE MUST START TAKING 2019 SCIENCE TO THEIR DAILY PROCESSES. INDIVIDUALS IN ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS NOW NEED TO MAKE EDUCATED DECISIONS. TALKFESTS WITH COMMITTEES OF YESTERDAY HAVE SHOWN TO BE OUT OF TOUCH WITH GLOBAL PROCESS AND NOT KEPT ABREAST EDUCATIONALLY WITH 2019 PROCESSES AND THE SCIENCES WHICH SUPPORT IT. THIS IS RESULTING IN THE INABILITY TO " DO NO HARM " HOW & WHERE DO WE BEGIN TO FIX THIS?
  24. Brenda Bonnett

    Are DNA tests reliable - news item

    Thanks to our friend and collaborator Dr. Jerold Bell, veterinary practitioner, Adjunct Professor of Clinical Genetics at Tufts University, and Chair of the World Small Animal Veterinary Medical Association Hereditary Disease Committee, for sharing this link and video: I-Team: Are doggy DNA tests reliable, worth your money? Several journalists are taking this approach of testing one or a few dogs by sending material to several companies and on the basis of that determining relative quality of the genetic test provides GTPs). Wouldn't it be lovely if life were that simple! Raising awareness is a great first step, and this presentation, e.g. is simple and clear and worth watching, however, there is the need for further education of consumers. The message from the experts (Dr. Bell and another veterinarian) are also worth heeding. I will add my spin on their cautions, which include: Breed identification tests should be taken 'with a grain of salt' There is variation across companies. IPFD with our Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs and associated resources is working to help provide transparency and improve best practices in the industry. Breed testing is only one type of DNA test. Others include testing for existing or potential diseases, use in clinical diagnosis or for breeding decisions and more... so consumers should know what they are testing for and why before selecting tests and keep this in mind in selecting the GTP and interpreting the results. IPFD is working to provide tools to help consumers. Veterinarians - although challenged like all of us to keep up with this burgeoning field of genetic testing, are important to consult... they are especially good at putting DNA testing into the perspective of the big picture of health and wellness for pets. Genetic Testing is a key theme are the upcoming 4th International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW) being held in Old Windsor, England at the end of May 2019. Many stakeholders in dog health - kennel and breed clubs, owners, breeders, researchers, veterinarians, welfare groups are all represented at the IDHWs and focused on address of these challenges. See below for links to other resources on DogWellNet.com. Getting Started with Genetic Testing Choosing a Genetic Test Provider
  25. Our colleagues at Human Behaviour Change for Animals posted this on their Facebook page: "Fantastic work exploring the demand for rhino horn with the aim of creating campaigns with messaging that is more likely to work than current messaging. At HBCA we believe that it is vital that we don't make assumptions about why people do or don't do things and that we find out for ourselves so we enjoyed reading this article and the papers it links to." And directed us to: We asked people in Vietnam why they use rhino horn. Here’s what they said. (Image: Malaysia’s wildlife department seized 50 African rhino horns destined for Vietnam last year. EPA-EFE/FAZRY ISMAIL) As I read it I noticed parallels to challenges with human behaviour change in dogs. Words like: deeply held beliefs... status... and focus on personal wants and needs and not what consumers consider 'remote' issues. From the article: "Our findings shed light on why current campaigns against rhino horn purchases aren’t working. For example, they tend to highlight the plight of rhinos, suggest that rhino horn doesn’t have medicinal properties or emphasize the legal consequences of purchasing it. ... From our research it’s clear that people who buy rhino horn won’t be won over by any of these arguments." As the authors suggest... in order for education efforts to make a difference - actually change outcomes - "[campaigns] must be "better informed about the values associated with the use of rhino horn and that target the most prevalent types of uses." I would suggest that we can cross out rhino horn and write in any number of current controversial issues in the dog world and take this as good advice. To become 'better informed' we must listen to each other and not impose our perception of the important issues or compelling arguments onto others if we want to be effective. Many of us are thinking about these issues as we approach the 4th IDHW in Windsor, UK, later this month. See, e.g. Ian Seath's latest blog: We need to stop trying to change people’s minds!
  26. Love is Blind is a joint initiative of the Australian Veterinary Association and the RSPCA: "We’re raising public awareness about the animal welfare problems caused by exaggerated physical features such as brachycephaly, short limbs and excessive skin wrinkling, and how these problems can be prevented." This campaign stresses many of the issues in international work being presented on DogWellNet.com and the work - building on previous Workshops - that will happen at the imminent 4th International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW), in Windsor, UK, 30 May - 01 June, 2019. Including: The challenges of the brachycephalic breeds need to be understood by current AND future owners, breeders, veterinarians, kennel and breed clubs and other stakeholders, All these groups need to work together for the benefit of individual dogs and the breeds. The material suggests actions needed to be taken by each of these groups, including attention to sourcing of dogs, breeding, showing and more. Resources: See the Australian Love is Blind homepage for links to material, including several videos explaining the increased susceptibility of these dogs to heat and providing practical advice for owners. We have recently posted on Facebook a video entitled 'The Purebred Crisis' that describes this campaign, interviews veterinarians, owners and a breeder-judge. This video highlights the very different attitudes and perceptions for various individuals. It is this variation in opinion and approach to these dogs that complicates efforts to improve health and welfare in these breeds. I have discussed this in previous blogs. There is no question that people are attracted and deeply attached to these dogs that have, as the Aussies say, "squishy faces", and that they have delightful personalities. However, it is also clear that some owners do not realize the health and welfare challenges in these breeds. One of the themes at the 4th IDHW is effective communication, and we need to use all available tools and knowledge from experts in order to change human behaviour - to not only educate people but also to encourage collaboration. See more in Brenda's blogs, including: French Bulldog Health Seminar October 2018 Breeding: A Moral Choice? and: 4th International Dog Health Workshop Pre-Meeting Resources, for example: 4th IDHW Theme #5: Exaggerations and Extremes in Dog Conformation And this previous post on DogWellnet.com: Love is Blind - Dr Philip Moses
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