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  4. Dave St. Louis

    Canadian Kennel Club

    The Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) is the primary registry body for purebred dogs in Canada and currently recognizes 175 breeds. As a non-profit organization, the CKC is dedicated to encouraging, guiding, and advancing the interests of purebred dogs and their responsible owners and breeders in Canada and promoting the knowledge and understanding of the benefits which dogs can bring to Canadian society.
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    Files list DachsLife 2018 v1.pptx 8.4 mb DachsLife 2018 v1.pdf 6.9 mb Aus-NZ DachsLife 2018 v1.pptx 546 kb Nordic DachsLife 2018 v1.pptx 910 kb
  6. Karin Hedberg

    Saluki

    The Swedish Saluki Club should also be on the list of breed clubs publishing i a Health information (re heart investigations, etc) and Breed Specific Strategy, http://www.saluki.se Some of this information is also published in English, http://www.saluki.se/index.php/en/
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    This is a short summary of RAS – Breeding strategies of the breed ‐ Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. The RAS is a document covering the breed and the breeding strategies for the future of a healthy and sound Toller. The full document is for now only in Swedish. The RAS has a yearly follow‐up, and is readjusted every 5th year, and is now in a working process (2019). -VERSION 2014‐
  8. Several recent articles have raised concerns about the quality of canine genetic testing. There is concern about the quality measures, standards and practices of genetic test providers (GTPs), but there are also factors related to test discovery, validation and application that may limit our ability to get the most out of genetic testing. Confusion, lack of transparency, absence of needed information on many levels, and incomplete understanding of the situations, individuals and breeds where testing is most useful are among the challenges. This article is in response to numerous queries and discussions on what is needed to improve the situation.
  9. A year-end update on the immense progress we've made in the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) in 2018 and our plans for 2019:
  10. Breed-Specific Health Strategies by breed, nationally and internationally.
  11. The Concept of ‘Breed’ and how it influences health and welfare in dogs.
  12. Dave St. Louis

    4th IDHW: Schedule

    4th DHW -- Tentative Program Schedule ... posted December, 2018.
  13. Organized by the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) and The Kennel Club, in cooperation with other partners.
  14. A recent publication authored by members of the HGTD puts forward a suggested system of standards and guidelines for canine genetic testing laboratories. Standards and guidelines for canine clinical genetic testing laboratories https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00439-018-1954-4 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ See the IPFD commentary on this publication, in the context of Improving Canine Genetic Testing. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ First Online: 13 November 2018... The paper sets out a series of standard requirements the authors feel should provide both minimum and optimal standards for any canine genetic testing laboratory, including: personnel, facilities, quality practices, privacy issues, and a section on test validation and results reporting. A self-assessment check list is also available. While not all aspects of the self-assessment will be applicable to all genetic test providers, it is one way that test providers may choose to improve the quality of direct to consumer genetic testing.
  15. Brenda Bonnett

    "We do this for the dogs' sake"

    I have frequently heard people say that what they are doing is 'for the dogs'' when it might seem it is mainly for their own goals.- but the Swedish Kennel Club has posted an informative video about the Breed Specific Instructions that makes it clear that the only goal with this program is to promote the health and welfare of dogs. Renowned judges explain why they think their role in promoting health and welfare is so important. We have lots of information on the BSI and the Swedish Breed-Specific Breeding Strategies, in general (as well as, lists of breeds with breed specific strategies from several countries on DogWellNet.com and this video really puts it all in perspective. We all know that health and welfare of dogs is the responsibility of all stakeholders in the dog world and judges are no exception. The impact of dog shows and the awarding of wins to specific dogs has a big impact on the public perception of pedigree dogs, in general, and also of specific breeds. It is crucial that dogs that achieve success in these increasingly 'prime time', public displays epitomize the best of the best - not just in looks, but also in health. All organizations licensing dog judges insist on 'judges education' but the BSI program takes it a step further, insisting that judges take responsibility in only promoting dogs without physical manifestations of conditions/ conformations that may limit health and welfare. The BSI process is followed in all Scandinavian countries, as well as several other European countries. A key part of the BSI process is the completion of reports by the judges (discussed in the video); and here is a link to an example of a report required for German Shepherd Dogs by Rad van Beheer in The Netherlands. The Canadian Kennel Club instituted an observer program in 2017, but I haven't found full details on the goals of the program. The AKC has a Field Rep program and, although at the moment I do not think these North American programs have breed-specific requirements similar to the BSI, clearly there are structures in place that could facilitate such an approach. A striking comment in the video was that judges must be on the lookout for negative trends and help ensure that these do not progress. I am not a judge; I briefly showed dogs in the distant past; and I am often concerned by what I see at show events. I was recently at the National Specialty of the French Bulldog Club of America in Louisville, KY, USA, at the end of October 2018. It was an honor to talk to the club members who are concerned about health issues in this breed. However, I was confused by seeing many dogs being shown that clearly had no actual tails (maybe 2 coccyx vertebrae), clearly so in the eyes of this veterinarian, and described as such by the competitors as a recent trend. And yet, I was repeatedly assured that 'the standard specifies that a French Bulldog must have a tail'. Such a contradiction, such an extreme, would presumably not be allowed, under the BSI, especially when this is not a cosmetic change, but a structural one. It is particularly concerning given that we know that French Bulldogs have an increased risk for spinal abnormalities and a new paper suggests that selection for screw tails may have led to a syndrome of abnormalities in both English and French Bulldogs. Every one who has bred dogs knows that focus on one characteristic, especially going for extremes, can lead to occurrence of unforeseen consequences. Nothing happens in isolation with breeding and selection. Congrats to the Swedes for this video and I hope it will encourage more judges to take an approach like this - regardless of whether or not they are under a requirement to do so. Because our activities really should be 'for the dogs' sake'.
  16. The book, Standards, Santé et Génétique chez le Chien / Standards, Health and Genetics in the Dog was created by the Société Centrale Canine (SCC) in collaboration with the Fédération Cynophile Internationale (F.C.I.) and the Swedish Kennel Club (SKK). Under the direction of Claude Guintard and Grégoire Leroy, the publication was presented as a tribute to Mrs. René Sporre-Willes and Mr. Raymond Triquet, longstanding chairs of the F.C.I.'s the Standards Commission, at the Third IPFD Dog Health Workshop held in Paris from April 21 to 23, 2017. Standards, Santé et Génétique chez le Chien / Standards, Health and Genetics in the Dog presents information from the world of dogs which can be applied in service to canine and human health and well-being. This work includes contributions by veterinarians, researchers, and dog-theorists who offer insights into the development of breed standards as well as the incredible advances in molecular genetics. We at DogWellNet are delighted to be able to present the content from this book's 396 pages which includes 20 texts in English and in French distributed in two large chapters. The book's Table of Contents (TOC-Standards, Santé et Génétique chez le Chien-Standards, Health and Genetics in Dogs) is available to DWN guests as well as DWN members. DWN members will have access to all of the book's texts available in DWN's Downloads section. Over the coming year we will feature texts from the book in DWN articles which will be accessible to DWN's members as well as guests. We would like to thank the book's producers and authors for their exceptional knowledge, extraordinary insights and for their willingness to share their expertise with people who are a part of the international dog community.
  17. As we have seen, veterinarians and their organizations have been engaging significantly in aspects of health in breeds and healthy breeding. Here is a recent position paper, The Role of Health Conscious Breeding and Genetic Testing in Reducing the Impact of Hereditary Disease, from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA). The Hereditary Disease Committee of the WSAVA is an IPFD Collaborator.
  18. Animal Law Update mentions the HGTD's efforts to improve standardization of, and access to, robust genetic testing... along with IPFD's response to the Nature article, Pet genomics medicine runs wild.
  19. England: October 1st 2018: new Regulations replaced a number of existing licensing regimes involving activities related to dog ownership, management and dog breeding: selling animals as pets providing for or arranging for the provision of boarding for cats or dogs hiring out horses dog breeding keeping or training animals for exhibition For a look at the new regulations see... The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 Associated documents can be found here: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/486/resources. Among the associated documents are the "Explanatory Memorandum for THE ANIMAL WELFARE (LICENSING OF ACTIVITIES INVOLVING ANIMALS) (ENGLAND) REGULATIONS 2018: 2018 No. 486 " and the "Final Impact Assessment" which covers effects of these new regulations on the business and public sectors - both documents provide insights into issues and inconsistencies with previously existing regulations - which are addressed to one degree or another by the new Regulations. Statistics cited in the Final Impact Statement show how many licensed businesses are subject to the New Regulations. Dog Breeding comes in at 4,950. Under the new Regulations it is hoped that the Risk-based assessments for determining the length of time between business license renewals (1 up to 3 years) will result "in a shift towards more favourable practices by businesses in order to move into the lower and medium risk categories" - thereby reducing costs.
  20. The Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) and several of our Leadership GTPs were mentioned in a recent article for The Atlantic, a news outlet that addresses US national debate on politics, business, foreign affairs, and cultural trends.
  21. - October 31, 2018 - News from the Société Centrale Canine - LOF Select ♦ Article - UPDATED: 12-5-2018 ♦ Congratulations and Thanks to IPFD Partners, SCC, the French Kennel Club, for recognizing the importance of HGTD in their steps to protect the quality of their pedigree and health database. Stay tuned for more information on their approach and plans... In the meantime see news just in from the French Kennel Club... And see updated information from the SCC's Health and Genetic Resources Project Manager, Fleur Marie Missant, on this change of the rules for registering data in the SCC database.
  22. News & Highlights Expertise, inspiration and insight... Breed education at its finest! Helpful Hint Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  23. The International science journal Nature has published our response to a recent article, Pet genomics medicine runs wild.
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