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Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi

Administrators
  • Content Count

    186
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi

  • Rank
    Stellar Member

Contact Methods

  • Skype
    aimee llewellyn-zaidi

Profile Information

  • Region
    North America
  • Location
    Oregon
  • Country
    USA
  • Current Affiliation
    IPFD
  • Position / Title
    Project Director Harmonization Inititative
  • Interests
    Dog Health
    Genetics
  • Academic Credentials
    Bachelors degree
  • Expertise/Proficiencies
    Dog Health/Veterinary Medicine
    Education
    Research
    Writing/Communication
  • Specific Breed(s) of Interest
    Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  • Breed Club Rep; Board Member or Breeding/ Health Committee member
    No
  • Attended an International Dog Health Workshop
    No
  • Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris
    IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs

Recent Profile Visitors

3,008 profile views
  1. 19 Oct 2020 If you’re a dog owner, or looking for a puppy what does it REALLY mean when a dog is “genetically tested”? “My dog is genetically tested” is an increasingly common statement from dog owners. We see it on breeder’s webpages as part of advertising puppies, or as information on the dam/sire… it’s common on social media as a point of pride or a mark of care and responsibility by owners… but what does genetically tested (or DNA tested) actually mean? While using genetic testing as part of pre-breeding testing is a really valuable tool, a genetically tested dog is not, in itse
  2. Vets – what can HGTD do for you? Genetic testing is part of our dog's lives Just as genetic testing has become normalized in the human world, thanks to popular direct to consumer products like 23 and Me, or Ancestry.com, so it has in the veterinary world. While perhaps once the preserve of specialist dog breeders, it is increasingly common for vets in practice to have questions from clients about DNA testing. While covering the basics of testing and inheritance is part of many veterinary educations, it is unreasonable to expect anyone to have knowledge of the 300+ different genetic
  3. HGTD This Week, 7 Aug 2020: Canine Crime Scene Investigators When we think about genetic testing, we often focus on how it can be a tool to improve health and welfare - generally centered around breeding for health or finding more about the health or potential health risks for an individual dog. Knowing about health risks that are especially relevant to specific breeds or dog types makes testing even more powerful in helping reduce risks of disease or undesirable traits (see Breed Relevancy Ratings). Most commonly, genetic screening and diagnostic testing focuses on: disease tests, breed e
  4. The Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) project work includes harmonizing genetic test information across many different boundaries. That can be as simple as adding consistency to nomenclature from around the world, or as challenging as cataloging test information and research from dozens of different international sources. With so much variation in how tests are developed, and how they are released to the public, a big part of my work is ensuring that phene names we publish on HGTD are consistent, accurate, and representative of whatever genetic test a person is seeking out.
  5. The continued review of breed-specific tests for assigning relevancy ratings, and ongoing discussions with genetic experts has led to a refinement of the breed relevancy ratings (please see: BRR) . To better accommodate the spectrum of genetic test validation, we’ve added a new orange BRR. The orange BRR indicates where all current available evidence has been reviewed, but the relevancy is inconclusive. It could be that a mutation is detectable in a specific breed, but that there is no evidence that this correlates with clinical development of the disease/phene. It could also be that the
  6. HGTD, and IPFD, were thrilled to be able to send our very best wishes and acknowledgements to Prof Frank Nicholas, on the 25th Anniversary of the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) resource. (see Brenda's Blog) Collaboration with, and integration of OMIA's information is vital for a lot of what HGTD is able to do - and fundamental to animal genetics researchers the world over. OMIA is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 251 animal species. OMIA is a great example of collaboration in action - authored by Professor Frank Nicholas o
  7. HGTD Update: 12 May 2020 Since the last blog, we’ve had additional expert review of many Breed Relevancy Ratings (BRRs) – particular in commonly tested eye conditions, and ataxias. As we are growing our expert out-reach for input into BRRs, we are pleased to note that there is consensus between experts self-reviewing their tests as well as peer-reviewing each other. This adds reassurance to us that the current BRR estimation of combining what we can learn from research publications, phene discoverer’s expert opinions, and informal peer-review between geneticists, is working. So far, we ha
  8. We get questions about how we ensure the quality of the information available on HGTD. It can actually be very challenging, and we rely on having good processes, and collaboration when developing content. To meet the IPFD principle of transparency, we are starting a series of blogs to describe how we manage this resource. We hope to then provide a regular news feed on HGTD developments and changes, to give you all an insight into this work. To get started, here is a little insight into running and maintaining HGTD. How do new genetic test providers (GTPs) join? GTPs reach HGTD
  9. Is COVID-time the Right Time to Kon Mari Your Genetic Testing Plans? a blog by Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi, MSc; Project Director of the IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD) initiative. “People around the world have been drawn to this philosophy not only due to its effectiveness, but also because it places great importance on being mindful, introspective and forward-looking.” -Marie Kondo, Founder of the Kon Mari method. If you’ve already, like so many of us, used the Kon Mari de-cluttering method of “sparking joy” and being “mindful, introspective, and forwar
  10. A recent article provided by the Golden Retriever Club of America, Golden Retriever Health and Genetics Highlight: Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis in Golden Retrievers, by Ann Hubbs and Ron Rubrecht,, discussed the challenges faced in Fall 2018, by a breeder who had unsuspectingly bred a litter of puppies from two carriers of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL 5) – a devastating neurological disease considered rare in the breed. While a DNA test existed, most Golden Retriever owners wouldn’t be aware of the condition, let alone testing options. The breeder did the absolute right thing when rea
  11. I do not know how parentage and heritable disease testing relate in terms of privacy concerns or crossovers between the 2 - if a dog tests positive for a deleterious genetic mutation (registration of litters denied) & that dog has relatives in a parentage db - can those relatives be subjected to further testing? Ann has sent through some good questions, which I think I can address: Genetic profile-based "kennel clubs" or any registration-type body are going to happen. This process would mean that your dog is registered based on their genetic profile, and any other relatives (an
  12. Dear Aimee, Do you know if the JADD in NSDTR is simple mendelian or complex? UC Davies genetics lab is offering a test. Do you know if it is a reliable test? Do you think the test should be mandatory for NSDTR used for breeding given its early age of onset and serious impact on an affected dog's health and welfare? I would be very grateful for your comments. Kind Regards, Anon UK NSDTR Breeder Dear NSDTR Breeder, It is my understanding that the JADD (Juvenile Addison's Disease) genetic test that is available is a simple inheritance (autosomal recessive) and base
  13. This report is to be viewed as a dynamic document summarizing the pre-thru-post 4th IDHW meeting activities around the Genetic Testing theme. Please note that additions and changes may occur. We will be welcoming comments and suggestions from participants in the workshop and working groups as we move forward. Please contact Aimee at aimee.llewellyn-zaidi@ipfdogs.com.
  14. Jane - I really appreciate your passion and obvious commitment to canine health. Personally, I think we start by doing everything we can to build collaborations between all the stakeholders in canine health, and to do all we can to support and encourage those who are already motivated to make positive changes. Leading by good example, and working together is a very powerful start. Every country has different laws, resources, and challenges to improve dog health, but we are trying to start by sharing the experiences of many different groups from around the world in the hopes that we can all lea
  15. 2019 Lewis TW, Mellersh CS. Changes in mutation frequency of eight Mendelian inherited disorders in eight pedigree dog populations following introduction of a commercial DNA test. Plos One, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209864 DNA Testing - General Subject: DNA Testing Type: Research Journal/Source: peer-reviewed research publication Authors/Researchers: University, Kennel Club (IPFD Partners); HGTD Participants Recommended For: Veterinarians, Owners/Breeders This study is one of the very few to investigate the impact of DNA testing on changing a dog
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