Brenda Bonnett

Administrators
  • Content count

    697
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About Brenda Bonnett

  • Rank
    Administrator

Profile Information

  • Region
    North America
  • Location
    Georgian Bluffs, Ontario, Canada
  • Current Affiliation
    International Partnership for Dogs, CEO
  • Position / Title
    CEO
  • Academic Credentials
    PhD
    Bachelors degree
    Veterinary degree (e.g. DVM)
    Masters (e.g. MSC)
    Veterinary Specialization
    Judging Certification
    Other (see below)
    Not Applicable
  • Expertise/Proficiencies
    Dog Health/Veterinary Medicine
    Dog Training
    Dog Shows/Exhibitions
    Dog Breeding
    Behavior
    Welfare
    Education
    Research
    Human-Animal Interactions
    Nutrition
    Genetics/Biotechnology
    Statistics/Epidemiology
    Writing/Communication
    Languages

Recent Profile Visitors

3,948 profile views
  1. Thanks, Ariel. As companion animals share our environment so closely, and many of our lifestyles exposures, they are an important part of any comprehensive One Health initiative. However, getting the human and animal docs and researchers to work well together is an ongoing challenge. The key point is - we need behavioural change across the board to develop prudent attitudes and actions in regard to antibiotic use, regardless of the species on which they are being used. Your compendium of existing guidelines and different approaches internationally will be an important resource.
  2. This section will compile resources available elsewhere on DogWellNet.com.
  3. Version 1.0.0

    11 downloads

    This guideline is intended to be used by breed clubs for breeds in which at least 250 dogs have been registered over the last five years. ' The template outlines the content and structure for the Breeding-specific Breeding Strategy Document (JTO). The recommended total length of a breeding strategy for these breeds is 25-30 pages. Received from Katariin Mäki, Kennelliitto
  4. The stellar group of participants at the IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop (3rd IDHW) came to collaborate and we really put them to work. The attendees, who certainly engaged and challenged and stimulated each other, accomplished a lot and it seems they are going home extremely satisfied with the experience. More importantly, the majority have committed to participate in specific actions, with clear objectives, goals, timelines and deliverables. There is a clear potential for real momentum to carry us forward towards the 4th IDHW in the UK. Our diligent efforts were assisted by candy bars courtesy Mars Veterinary ... between those and lots of strong French coffee, we pulled it off! A huge shout out to the French Kennel Club (SCC) for putting on a well-organized event at a great venue. The food was fantastic - thanks to Agria for sponsoring the breaks and lunches. The boat cruise on the Seine was extraordinary - thanks to Royal Canin ... more good food and wine with a panoramic view of the sites of Paris, including the amazing icon of the Eiffel Tour, complete with its delightful, hourly light-show. More information soon on the topics, challenges and future plans in the days to come. We will be posting material from speakers, posters, and break out sessions, and photographs as well as the detailed plans addressing breed-specific health strategies, behaviour and welfare implications of early socialization, exaggerations of conformation, the harmonization of genetic testing, education/ communication on appropriate use of antibiotics, and the need for numbers/ quantitative information. There will be lots of outreach to stakeholders who weren't at the meeting; hopefully to further engage the wider dog community in this important work. Thanks to all those who contributed... from individual dog owners, breeders, breed club reps, kennel club advisors and executives, many veterinarians, researchers, corporate and industry people, welfare organisations ... I feel like I am at the Academy Awards and will surely miss someone! This was a diverse community united by a commitment to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of dogs and to promote the best in human-dog interactions. It is an honour and privilege to be part of this devoted and passionate community. The future looks bright for innovative and sustained international collaboration.
  5. People are starting to arrive in Paris for the 3rd IDHW ! Paris in the spring is living up to its reputation with sunshine and flowering trees. Too bad we will keep our delegate inside working hard for the dogs for 2 days! We are expecting about 135 delegates from 24 countries. We have vets and breeders, researchers and judges, experts in welfare and behaviour, genetic advisors, various non-profits, industry representatives, dog owners... and more... so a wide array of stakeholders. As is common in the dog world, many people wear more than one hat. We have representatives from 18 National kennel clubs and the FCI; including the current or former Presidents of at least 4 KCs. There are scientists from at least 13 Universities and research institutes, from at least 6 different countries. There are over 15 companies from the pet industry attending, including many genetic testing labs. There are numerous veterinary organizations and welfare organizations represented. As well as, breed clubs, breeders and dog owners. This is a real working meeting... we hope to engage all present in discussions with the result being definite action plans to be underway immediately following the workshop; leading to results ready to present at the 4th International Dog Health Workshop to be held in the UK in 2019, hosted by The KC. Exciting times! Stay tuned for more information. Check us out on Facebook and our new Twitter feed @IPFDogs and #IDHWParis ...
  6. Carlotta - when you say, "They seem to work closely with UKC in the United States." to whom are your referring. Certainly not FCI or the Swedish KC...??
  7. Nordic strategy regarding the use of DNA tests in breeding IDHWorkshops Presentations - DNA - Genetic Testing .. from previous workshop in Germany Various entries in Blogs - especially from Katariina Mäki and Gregoire Leroy... e.g. Inherited diseases: the adequate breeding strategy (1) and (2)
  8. Please see: Summary presentations from the 2nd International Dog Health Workshop in Dortmund: From Ian Seath's blog: Breeding Strategies – a range of options ... This piece includes some basic guidelines for health strategies; a discussion of the role of data; and the influence of people themselves. National Breeding strategies, e.g, a template from the Norwegian KC: NKK - Breed specific breeding strategy Also from Ian Seath's blog: A 5-point plan for improving canine health and welfare (partly from a talk by Phillipa Robinson) Historical perspective, need for a systems approach. DogWellNet.com resources and links to national health strategies... perhaps too much to read... but please browse the possibilities. Full Attendee List (by Theme) for IPFD here: Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf
  9. General Goals and Outcomes - all Themes: By the conclusion of the 3rd IDHW participants should leave with a clear sense of key decisions on priorities / needs within the theme; remaining gaps/ challenges/ controversies; List of specific tasks/ actions to be undertaken over the next two years, by whom; and a clear understanding of how they, personally, will help achieve the desired outcomes. Please see: 3rd IDHW_Program Overview, Schedule, Themes and Speakers for further information. Breed-Specific Health Strategies Theme National and international programs and approaches to studying and improving health of dogs within a breed. • Working Group Coordinator(s): Helena Skarp, Sweden; • Resource persons: Brenda Bonnett; Ian Seath, UK (plenary speaker); Catherine Andre (plenary speaker); • Facilitator: Gregoire Leroy, France • Note Taker: Kim Bellamy, Norway Keys To The Breed-Specific Health Strategies Theme: An issue frequently raised by breeding advisors, breed clubs and individual breeders, is how do they define and understand the ’big picture’ for their breed and how do the manage all the complex inputs that affect the health and welfare of their dogs? They hear in the media that they should test for and preferably prevent every possible disease, health and welfare issue in their breed as well as improving temperament/ behaviour and do that while maximizing genetic diversity of the population. Breed clubs must be able to make some kind of ranking of importance in terms of influence on longevity, severity, death vs. chronic disease, costs etc.; they must be able to put this together with good information on the accuracy/ efficacy of screening strategies - DNA tests, other - as well as the strategies that are available; and from all that make balanced, preferably evidence-based decisions as to what is an appropriate strategy for the long term health of the breed; and then they must advise breeders on how to proceed with individual breeding decisions. Of course, there is also the issue that the primary goal of the breeder, might be to, at least in the short term, breed a competition-winning dog. Unfortunately, without access to the needed holistic information, evidence and effective tools we tend to see challenges, e.g. running off after the DNA 'test of the month'; knee-jerk reactions to storms on Facebook; breeding strategies that change when the executive of the breed club changes... etc. etc. Our plenary speaker, Ian Seath, will give us an overview of what the Dachshund Breed Council in the UK is doing. The approach to managing health and disease at a breed level varies widely across countries, kennel clubs, breed clubs and breeds. Notwithstanding, there is a great potential to learn from and work together with those who are dealing with similar issues. Key concepts for this theme include a need to: Increase exchange of information about disease prevalence, population structure and health programs between countries. Identify and propose strategies to limit the obstacles that differently designed health programs in different countries present to the possibility to use breeding stock between countries Move away from the adoption or creation of new health initiatives without adopting a holistic approach Find and share the best resources and tools to address these issues. Continue reading below or download PDF 3rd IDHW Guide for Participants_Breed Specific Health Strategies _15April2017.docx
  10. In addition to the Theme:Outline - here some reading we hope you will do before coming to the Workshop. If you aren't acquainted with it, please see: the Harmonization Project Initiative description. For further/preparatory reading, you might look at a similar, more extensive developement for humans: Eurogentest which, for searching for labs and tests will take you to Orphanet. ICAR has an accreditation program for labs doing cattle testing. Another accreditation scheme in use is the Standards and Guidelines from the American College of Medical Genetics in conjunction with the College of American Pathologists. Although these are for human genetic diagnostic testing, there is a lot of good material in here that ensures quality between laboratories and across the discipline. General Standards and Guidelines for Clinical Genetics Laboratories General Policies Policies specific to Clinical Molecular Genetics You will receive an Attendee list in your package at the workshop. But here is the Full Attendee List (by Theme): Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf And many further resources are on DogWellNet.com... not required reading... but or your information.
  11. Please see report from the Nordic Kennel Union: NKU STATEMENTS AND PROPOSALS REGARDING RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN BRACHYCEPHALIC DOGS.pdf For topical discussion of latest media reports on Brachycephalics, please read Brenda's Blog: Veterinary Record: "Brachycephalic tipping point: time to push the button? " You will receive an Attendee list in your package at the workshop. But here is the Full Attendee List (by Theme): Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf
  12. Zoopsy Position Statement On Puppy Socialization... Early out walks English translation "Zoopsy is a veterinary association of Zoopsychiatry . The aim of its members is to protect, improve or restore the behavioral balance of domestic animals by using all the means available in the respect of the animal, its well-being and the relationship with its owners ." Behavioral and psychological outcomes for dogs sold as puppies through pet stores and/or born in commercial breeding establishments: Current knowledge and putative causes Franklin D. McMillan* Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research; Volume 19, May–June 2017, Pages 14–26 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1558787817300102/1-s2.0-S1558787817300102-main.pdf?_tid=60373a34-0fd4-11e7-b2ff-00000aacb35d&acdnat=1490279228_9bff189f4ad03e3d57fca20eb7538c96 Puppy parties and beyond: the role of early age socialization practices on adult dog behavior https://www.dovepress.com/puppy-parties-and-beyond-the-role-of-early-age-socialization-practices-peer-reviewed-fulltext-article-VMRR PDF version: VMRR-62081-puppy-parties-and-beyond--the-role-of-early-age-socializatio_042915.pdf Personality Consistency in Dogs: A Meta-Analysis Jamie L. Fratkin , David L. Sinn, Erika A. Patall, Samuel D. Gosling … PLOS Published: January 23, 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0054907 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0054907 AVSAB Position Statement On Puppy Socialization http://noriusuns.lt/images/puppy_socialization.pdf You will receive an Attendee list in your package at the workshop. But here is the Full Attendee List (by Theme): Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf
  13. In addition to the Theme outline, please have a look at these two papers before arriving at the Workshop: Approaches to canine health surveillance Dan G O’Neill1*, David B Church2, Paul D McGreevy3, Peter C Thomson3 and Dave C Brodbelt1 Approaches to canine health surveillance.pdf DISEASE BURDEN IN FOUR POPULATIONS OF DOG AND CAT BREEDS COMPARED TO MIXED-BREED DOGS AND EUROPEAN SHORTHAIR CATS Disease burden in four populations of dog and cat breeds.pdf You will receive an Attendee list in your package at the workshop. But here is the Full Attendee List (by Theme): Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf See more: Peer Reviewed Research - Disease surveillance in pedigreed dogs and other resources here. Full Attendee List (by Theme) for IPFD here:Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf
  14. In addition to the Theme: Outline... please review these before the meeting: Risk reduction and management strategies to prevent transmission of infectious disease among dogs at dog shows, sporting events, and other canine group settings, Jason Stull, et al.: Risk reduction and management strategies JAVMA.pdf Guidelines for Hygiene in Veterinary Practices - FECAVA: 4Poster hygiène FECAVA.pdf You will receive an Attendee list in your package at the workshop. But here is the Full Attendee List (by Theme): Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf Some extra references about client pressure to prescribe in human and veterinary medicine: Outtakes and references on Prescribing Pressure.docx And other resources Education and Communication on DogWellNet.com. Full Attendee List (by Theme) for IPFD here:Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf
  15. General Goals and Outcomes - all Themes: By the conclusion of the 3rd IDHW participants should leave with a clear sense of key decisions on priorities / needs within the theme; remaining gaps/ challenges/ controversies; List of specific tasks/ actions to be undertaken over the next two years, by whom; and a clear understanding of how they, personally, will help achieve the desired outcomes. Please see: 3rd IDHW_Program Overview, Schedule, Themes and Speakers for further information. Education and Communication Theme: Antimicrobial Resistance/ Prudent Use of Antibiotics Integrating information from various sources for demography, prevalence, risks, severity, duration, geographic and temporal variation and other population-level information. Working Group Coordinator(s): Gilles Chaudieu, France; IPFD/SCC Steering Committee Liaison: Gregoire Leroy; Brenda Bonnett Resource persons: Dr. Xavier Levy and Dr. J.F. Rousselot; Facilitator: Jason Stull, USA (also Plenary Speaker) Notetaker: Annika Klang, Sweden (multi-lingual) Keys To This Theme “On 21 September 2016, the President of the UN General Assembly convenes an one-day high-level meeting at the UN Headquarters in New York on “Antimicrobial Resistance“, with the participation of Member States, non-governmental organizations, civil society, the private sector and academic institutions, in order to provide input (link). The primary objective of the meeting is to summon and maintain strong national, regional and international political commitment in addressing antimicrobial resistance comprehensively and multi-sectorally, and to increase and improve awareness of antimicrobial resistance.” Clearly the issues of antimicrobial resistance (AR) and prudent use of antibiotics (PUA), are global and cross national and species boundaries. Human and veterinary practitioners should share information on AR/PUA, but its practical application could be improved. Although many authorities and organizations are creating rules and guidelines for health care practitioners, there has been inadequate recognition that there has to be education and re-education of practitioners and consumers; long-standing attitudes and behaviours must be changed. Veterinarians need to work collaboratively with breeders to effect change; this will require enhanced communication between these stakeholder groups. Creative and effective education must take place and all stakeholders need both information and tools to take action for prudent use of antimicrobials. KEYS: Determine resources and needs for innovative and effective education and communication within and across stakeholder groups Identify specific international collaboration and actions to accomplish goals identified during breakout sessions. The topic ‘Antimicrobial Resistance/ Prudent Use of Antibiotics’ has been chosen to identify/ highlight, e.g.: What strategies are most effective in not only educating but also changing long-held attitudes and beliefs? Are there challenges because of a possible disconnect between veterinarians and breeders? How can this be addressed Where is international collaboration most needed, e.g., what key messages need to be sent globally? What are the most effective tools to widely share information/ expertise; to prevent redundancy of efforts and to create change? Are there existing materials, approaches and tools which can be shared? How can we monitor the impact of the tools/ change of behaviours to determine if efforts are being successful? Do we need to develop metrics? Continue reading below or download PDF 3rd IDHW Guide for Participants_Education and Communication_14April2017.docx