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Brenda Bonnett

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Everything posted by Brenda Bonnett

  1. Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. A general reflection is that the increasing and necessary focus on health and soundness in purebred dogs contains an increasing demand for advanced knowledge about excellent breed type in judges. Show judges are expected to preserve breed type of the purebred dogs – not only the health and life of the dogs with pedigrees. Link BSI 2nd Edition 2018 -- https://www.skk.se/globalassets/dokument/utstallning/breed-special-specific-instructions---bsi-a8.pdf Also: see our Downloads section for more information on the BSI... posted ... with permission from Dr Göran Bodegård MD PhD Chairman of the BSI group of the Swedish Kennel Club, Stockholm, Sweden
  2. This section will serve as a table of contents and compile resources available elsewhere on DogWellNet.com. Current AR/AMR information and links to news from national and international organizations and agencies will be posted. The TOC has been mainly compiled as part of the IPFD Student Project of Ariel Minardi and supported by the Skippy Frank Fund. For a list of Ariel's work see, also, IPFD Student Project 'B.A.R.K. | Bacterial Antimicrobial Resistance Knowledge' - Chronological Overview.
  3. Brenda Bonnett

    "We do this for the dogs' sake"

    I have frequently heard people say that what they are doing is 'for the dogs'' when it might seem it is mainly for their own goals.- but the Swedish Kennel Club has posted an informative video about the Breed Specific Instructions that makes it clear that the only goal with this program is to promote the health and welfare of dogs. Renowned judges explain why they think their role in promoting health and welfare is so important. We have lots of information on the BSI and the Swedish Breed-Specific Breeding Strategies, in general (as well as, lists of breeds with breed specific strategies from several countries on DogWellNet.com and this video really puts it all in perspective. We all know that health and welfare of dogs is the responsibility of all stakeholders in the dog world and judges are no exception. The impact of dog shows and the awarding of wins to specific dogs has a big impact on the public perception of pedigree dogs, in general, and also of specific breeds. It is crucial that dogs that achieve success in these increasingly 'prime time', public displays epitomize the best of the best - not just in looks, but also in health. All organizations licensing dog judges insist on 'judges education' but the BSI program takes it a step further, insisting that judges take responsibility in only promoting dogs without physical manifestations of conditions/ conformations that may limit health and welfare. The BSI process is followed in all Scandinavian countries, as well as several other European countries. A key part of the BSI process is the completion of reports by the judges (discussed in the video); and here is a link to an example of a report required for German Shepherd Dogs by Rad van Beheer in The Netherlands. The Canadian Kennel Club instituted an observer program in 2017, but I haven't found full details on the goals of the program. The AKC has a Field Rep program and, although at the moment I do not think these North American programs have breed-specific requirements similar to the BSI, clearly there are structures in place that could facilitate such an approach. A striking comment in the video was that judges must be on the lookout for negative trends and help ensure that these do not progress. I am not a judge; I briefly showed dogs in the distant past; and I am often concerned by what I see at show events. I was recently at the National Specialty of the French Bulldog Club of America in Louisville, KY, USA, at the end of October 2018. It was an honor to talk to the club members who are concerned about health issues in this breed. However, I was confused by seeing many dogs being shown that clearly had no actual tails (maybe 2 coccyx vertebrae), clearly so in the eyes of this veterinarian, and described as such by the competitors as a recent trend. And yet, I was repeatedly assured that 'the standard specifies that a French Bulldog must have a tail'. Such a contradiction, such an extreme, would presumably not be allowed, under the BSI, especially when this is not a cosmetic change, but a structural one. It is particularly concerning given that we know that French Bulldogs have an increased risk for spinal abnormalities and a new paper suggests that selection for screw tails may have led to a syndrome of abnormalities in both English and French Bulldogs. Every one who has bred dogs knows that focus on one characteristic, especially going for extremes, can lead to occurrence of unforeseen consequences. Nothing happens in isolation with breeding and selection. Congrats to the Swedes for this video and I hope it will encourage more judges to take an approach like this - regardless of whether or not they are under a requirement to do so. Because our activities really should be 'for the dogs' sake'.
  4. Brenda Bonnett

    Biographies IPFD Board

    The initial Board of the IPFD is comprised of individuals with respected international reputations, who represent a broad array of stakeholders in dog health, well-being and welfare and who comprise a range of backgrounds and abilities that are needed by this new organization. They sit on the Board, not as representatives of their home organizations (Founding Partners), per se, but as individuals with commitment to the mission, vision and goals of the IPFD. Further, we have included an independent member of the Board who has no formal affiliation with the Founding Partners. Brief CVs for the current members of the IPFD Board are listed below.
  5. Brenda Bonnett

    IPFD International Dog Health Workshops

    The International Dog Health Workshops are biennial events designed to bring together stakeholders in dog health, well-being and welfare, and foster collaboration on an international scale.
  6. Hosted by the German Kennel club in February 2015
  7. In this section, we provide more information on programs, talks, action items, etc., from previous and upcoming International Dog Health Workshops (IDHWs).
  8. Brenda Bonnett

    IPFD: Background and Development

    A Continuing and Sustainable Development The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) and DogWellNet.com have come into being following a long history of efforts by many stakeholders to address dog health and well-being. An abbreviated timeline of key developments will highlight the complexity of issues addressed by the IPFD and DogWellNet and will list some of the many supporters and collaborators that have contributed directly or indirectly to this important work.
  9. Posted originally 26 July 2018; UPDATED 30 July 2018 Congratulations to the authors (Lisa Moses, Steve Niemi and Elinor Karlsson) for their commentary in Nature (and pdf, below). In “Pet genomics medicine runs wild” these authors have done a great job describing the myriad challenges related to genetic testing in pets. In fact, their concerns reflect those underpinning the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) initiative - the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (HGTD). The IPFD, together with an impressive team of Partners and Collaborators (national kennel clubs, animal industries, veterinary, academic, welfare and other organizations) and our Leadership Sponsor Genetic Test Providers (GTPs), is providing a practical and effective tool to support consumers, veterinarians and researchers. However, as we face these challenges, it is important to not lose sight of the phenomenal potential for genetic testing to support health, well-being and welfare in dogs, as well as aspects of human-dog interactions. Although the authors of the commentary justifiably call for this segment to have some controls, at the moment, there is no regulatory body that has the authority to impose standards on this burgeoning and unregulated industry - especially not on an international basis or in a timely fashion. Rather than waiting for consensus on controls, the IPFD (an independent, non-profit, registered in Sweden), together with our Partners, Collaborators and experts, as well as concerned GTPs, has created a platform that will provide the foundation to address many of the concerns raised in the Nature article.
  10. NOTE: Since this press release, as of April 2018, Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs is online. Please check it out! The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) announces the “Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs” initiative: to support the appropriate selection and use of DNA testing in dog health and breeding decisions The ever-increasing emergence of new canine DNA tests and testing laboratories has made choosing quality DNA testing providers and the right DNA tests for health and breeding decisions increasingly challenging for many owners, breeders and veterinarians. Working with a wide-spectrum of stakeholders in dog health, the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) "Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs" initiative will provide practical support to address these challenges.
  11. Brenda Bonnett

    European Parliament event: Health Before Looks

    Health before looks -- Collaborative action is urgently needed to stop the practice of extreme breeding in dogs and cats This message was delivered to the European Parliament at an event organized by our Collaborating Partner the Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA) together with the EU Dog and Cat Alliance and the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe(FVE). (Download PDF below.) This event was "aimed at ending the unnecessary suffering of dogs and cats bred with exaggerated features such as flat faces, narrowed nostrils, skin folds and protruding eyes" and is part of the ongoing work, especially throughout Europe, to address health and welfare in brachycephalic breeds. The speakers represented the veterinary, welfare and breed organization perspectives on the issue. It was great to see this international, multi-stakeholder approach, similar to that we have promoted through the IPFD International Dog Health Workshops (IDHWs) and reflected in the many resources on the brachycephalic isssue on DogWellNet.com. Kristin Prestrud (a veterinarian from another of our Partners, the Norwegian Kennel Club) put into perspective that although there are wide variations across dog breeds in form and function, there should be defined limits for extremes, so that selective breeding does not compromise health or welfare. The challenge, raised at our IDHWs is that those limits are not clear nor consistent across regions and cultures; we need research and collaborative work to define those limits. As Prestrud, explained, for pedigree dogs breeding happens according to written breed standards - however those are often open to interpretation and may vary widely across countries. "“We love that dogs look cute, that they have some particular look that we love. And so, short legs have got shorter, heavy bodies got heavier, long coats got longer, loose skin got looser, long ears got longer and wrinkles more extended. Not in all cases, not in all breeds, but in several breeds.” And when breeders select really strongly for some traits and restrict genetic input from outside, there is always the risk of reducing genetic variation." The British Veterinary Association’s encouragement of data reporting of conformation altering surgery (and caesareans) - by veterinarians with the consent of owners - was described. Similar registers are underway in, e.g. Scandinavian countries. However, there are challenges to compliance with these programs and only time will tell whether they achieve the goal of determining the prevalence of dogs that need such surgery. Speakers also highlighted the role of veterinarians in this issue, saying, “we must be aware that there are a lot of vets who earn their money by doing this very expensive surgery." I was encouraged to see that the discussion by the politicians did not focus simply on legislation of breeding as being the best solution. They discussed the need to control the marketing of unregistered puppies and kittens, “the majority of which are on the internet and are totally without control” . It was estimated that over half of puppies In the Netherlands come from unsupervised sources and it may be as high as 90% for some breeds, e.g. the French Bulldog. One of the members of parliament suggested that "efforts would be better focused on reducing demand by making extreme breed animals unfashionable. “We have to make unhealthy bad conformation unfashionable, it has to stop.”" And, so, as has been discussed in much of our work, we come back to this fact: the challenges are about the people, more than the dogs, and successfully improving health and welfare of dogs needs an approach that addresses human-animal interactions, human attitudes and actions, and using techniques of education that are likely to result in human behaviour change. Addressing sourcing of dogs and communication for change will be two themes at the upcoming 4th IPFD IDHW in Old Windsor, UK, May 30-June 1 2019. Congratulations to FECAVA and their co-organizers for an important event and to the European Parliament for taking an interest in the health and welfare of dogs. Health before looks Collaborative action is urgently needed to stop the practice of extreme breeding in dogs and cats Download: European Parliament Event article by Parliament Magazine - 7-2018
  12. In their announcement: New instructions for monitoring canine health at dog shows (2015): "The Finnish Kennel Club has published new Breed-Specific Instructions for dog show judges. The instructions were drafted with the purpose of steering dog show judges to pay closer attention to exaggerated breed types. The new instructions entered into force on 1 June 2015. A dog show judge is tasked with evaluating how well a dog matches its breed standard. How the breed standards are interpreted can, at times, lead judges and breeders to favour dogs that display tendencies towards exaggeration. Now, the breed standard will be supplemented by new Breed-Specific Instructions, which pay special attention to exaggerated breed types as well as each breed's special areas of risk that weaken the dog's fundamental soundness and health." See other articles on BSI on DogWellNet.com Download the 2014 Breed Specific Instructions.
  13. February 2015: DogWellNet.com was opened to the public (guests) after our launch at the 2nd International Dog Health Workshop in Dortmund, Germany. Spring - Winter 2015 --- Continued Development Phase: As stated, the key to the success of DogWellNet is developing the community of stakeholders in the dog world to provide content, to collaborate, and to help create this resource. We have been working with members from our Partners and various Experts. Following the workshop in Dortmund we have been including an increasing number of those associated with our Partners, Collaborators and contributors. These people are helping us to develop content, but more importantly, build the community structure that will underpin ongoing international collaborations.
  14. The International Partnership for Dogs is based on and promotes co-operation and collaboration. Our Partners are Organizations. Our membership structure - excerpted from our Statutes is: Membership Categories Founding Partner: The national Kennel Clubs of Sweden, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, as well as the Kennel Club (UK), the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (USA) and the Agria Animal Insurance-Swedish Kennel Club Research Fund. Initiating Patron: Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). Initiating Partner: Initiator to the establishment of IPFD. Will include stakeholders who make a commitment to the organisation and/or provide funds by January 2015 and agree to ongoing support/payment of dues, as defined by the Board. (extended to end November 2015) Member: Stakeholder organization or individual that supports IPFD with financial or other contributions, as defined by the Board. Voting Member: Designated by the Board from any membership category. In order to qualify for designation as a Voting Member, an organization or individual must have demonstrated their participation in the dog community and a commitment to dog health and well-being. Sponsor: open to companies, organizations and other associations which support IPFD financially or in any other way but do not qualify or wish to be a member of the IPFD. Donor: Private organizations, individuals and public institutions who support IPFD financially or in any other way but do not qualify or wish to be a member of the IPFD. Learn more in our Partners and Sponsors database. Several of our Partners maintain Blogs where they post news on their projects and initiatives. Including: Finnish Kennel Club News The Swedish Kennel Club Our IPFD CEO Our IPFD Board The OFA And, throughout the website you will find articles contributed by our Partners, Collaborators and Sponsors.
  15. For many years, Agria Animal Insurance, Sweden (Agria Djurförsäkring, Stockholm, Sweden) has supported veterinary research and provided basic statistics on diagnoses for health and life claims to Swedish breed clubs. Since 1995, Agria has collaborated with and funded researchers, from universities in Sweden and other countries, to produce scientific publications on descriptive and analytical research from their database. Since 2002, continuing their devotion to the health and well-being of dogs and their ongoing cooperation with the Swedish Kennel Club, Agria has produced information on both health care and life insurance claims in a format requested by and developed in consultation with breed clubs. Initially, information from 1995-2002 was compiled on 80 breeds and Mixed Breeds on 11 CDs (see the Agria Dog Breed Profiles ). The CDs were given free to those breed clubs and remaining copies are available to the public. Subsequently, the material has been developed into an even more accessible form - the Updates. These are given to Swedish breed clubs, and the information is incorporated into various health programs. Updates (2006-2011) for 118 breeds are available in our Downloads or links through our Pedigreed Dogs database (access is restricted to Advanced Members and IPFD Partners) You can view a list of these breeds and available insurance data here: BREED LIST updates nov 2014.pdf Click the following link for an overview of the Agria Updated Dog Breed Statistics (Description; Background Information and Hints on Interpretation): Description and Background to the Agria Updated Dog Breed Statistics 2006-2011.pdf. This information is also included in the downloadable file for each breed. Download an FAQ document for the Agria Dog Breed Statistics here: Agria Dog Breed Statistics FAQs.pdf Quick Links - Breeds with Agria Insurance Data on DWN – 11-4-2017 • Afghan Hound • Airedale Terrier • American Cocker Spaniel • American Staffordshire Terrier • Australian Cattle Dog • Australian Kelpie • Australian Shepherd • Basset Hound • Beagle • Beauceron • Bernese Mountain Dog • Bichon Frise • Bichon Havanais • Border Collie • Border Terrier • Borzoi • Bouvier des Flandres • Boxer • Briard • Bull Terrier • Bullmastiff • Cairn Terrier • Cane Corso • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel • Chihuahua • Chinese Crested • Chow Chow • Collie, Rough • Collie, Smooth • Dachshund, Miniature • Dachshund, Standard • Dalmatian • Danish-Swedish Farmdog • Dobermann • Dogue De Bordeaux • Drever • East Siberian Laika • Elkhound, Norwegian Grey • Elkhound, Swedish • Elkhound, White • English Bulldog • English Cocker Spaniel • English Setter • English Springer Spaniel • Eurasier • Finnish Hound • Finnish Lapphund • Finnish Spitz • Flat Coated Retriever • Fox Terrier • German Shorthaired Pointer • German Wirehaired Pointer • Golden Retriever • Great Dane • Great Pyrenees • Greyhound • Groenendael • Halleforshund • Hamilton Hound • Hovawart • Icelandic Sheepdog • Irish Red Setter • Irish Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier • Irish Wolfhound • Italian Greyhound • Jack Russell Terrier • Japanese Chin • Karelian Bear Dog • Labrador Retriever • Lagotto Romagnolo • Leonberger • Malinois • Newfoundland • Norfolk Terrier • Norrbottenspitz • Norwegian Buhund • Norwich Terrier • Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever • Papillon • Parson Russell Terrier • Pomeranian • Poodle, Miniature • Poodle, Standard • Poodle, Toy • Portuguese Water Dog • Pug • Rhodesian Ridgeback • Rottweiler • Saluki • Spanish Water Dog • St. Bernhard • Stabyhoun • Staffordshire Bull Terrier • Swedish Lapphund • Swedish Vallhund • Tervueren • The Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen • Tibetan Spaniel • Tibetan Terrier • Wachtelhund • Welsh Springer Spaniel • West Highland White Terrier • West Siberian Laika • Whippet • White Swiss Shepherd Dog • Yorkshire Terrier
  16. This work highlights both important areas of concern for individual dogs and breeds, as well as a need to engage a wider range of stakeholders to address health and welfare in all dogs. While continuing to engage and encourage best practices across kennel clubs, globally, we must also work with those who, in addition to cynological organizations, can work for sustainable wellness in all dogs.
  17. Continuing our series on The Brachycephalic Issue: An exciting research project is underway at Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge spearheaded by a stellar team of researchers : Jane Ladlow, MA VetMB CertSAS CertVR DipECVS MRCVS; Dr David Sargan, MA PhD; Dr Vicki Adams, DVM MSc PhD MRCVS; and Nai-Chieh Liu DVM MPhil into the Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS). In their flyer, Non-invasive Respiratory Function Assessment in Brachycephalic Dogs, they describe the study and call for participants in the UK. (internal link flyer -- BOAS flyers version 4 .pdf) This group has also published their findings in French Bulldogs. See: The Brachycephalic Issue: Evidence and Efforts: Characterisation of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome in French Bulldogs Using Whole-Body Barometric Plethysmography
  18. Brenda Bonnett

    Sweden: Breed Strategies

    In Sweden each breed club must produce a breeding strategy and health profile. We are continuing to build a resource of documents in English. These files can also be reached via the Breed Database page (if an English summary exists for the breed). Members can access The Swedish RAS (English) documents via Downloads at: http://dogwellnet.com/files/category/8-swedish-breeding-strategy-ras-documents-english-summary/ PLEASE - REGISTER TO ACCESS THESE DOCUMENTS Swedish RAS English Summaries are available for the following breeds (list reviewed 4-15-2018) Barbet: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/354-barbet-swedish-ras-english-summary/· Soft Coated Wheaton Terrier: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/275-irish-soft-coated-wheaten-terrier-breeding-strategy-finnish-kennel-club/· Borzoi|Teeth placement: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/278-bsi-borzoi-canine-teeth-placement/ · Poodle: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/286-poodle-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Portuguese Podengo: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/303-portuguese-podengo-ras-english/ · ChowChow: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/305-chow-chow-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Pug: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/312-pug-ras-breeding-strategy-english-summary/ · Swedish Valhund: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/313-swedish-vallhund-ras/ · Australian Shepherd: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/315-australian-shepherd-swedish-ras-breeding-strategy/ · Borzoi: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/316-borzoi-ras-breeding-strategy-2016-english-summary/ · Norbottenspitz: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/329-norrbottenspitz-ras-breeding-strategy-2016-english/ · Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/338-cavalier-king-charles-spaniel-ras-dwn-english-summary/ · Clumber Spaniel: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/75-clumber-spaniel-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Collie (rough|smooth) https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/77-collie-rough-smooth-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · French Bulldog: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/78-french-bulldog-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Golden Retreiver: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/79-golden-retriever-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Pomeranian: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/80-pomeranian-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Boston Terrier: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/83-boston-terrier-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Swedish Lapphund: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/365-breed-specific-breeding-strategy-for-swedish-lapphund-english-summary/
  19. Many national kennel clubs, other cynological organizations (e.g. breed clubs) have developed guidelines, approaches or programs to: describe and evaluate the health of specific breeds outline guidelines or regulations for screening tests or other assessments on potential breeding dogs raise awareness about issues in a given breed. These programs take different forms in different countries. In this section we will provide information on various approaches and programs and direct you to online resources. For general guidelines (not breed-specific) see also: country-specific General Breeding and Ethical Guidelines. Countries: Austria: Austrian Kennel Club - Response to Animal Welfare Legislation The Austrian Kennel Club ( Österreichische Kynologenverband - ÖKV ) initiated a project, "Konterqual", to address legislative concerns. Sharing work like this can help to inform other kennel clubs and countries dealing with similar issues. In addition to presenting the facts and outcomes, it is so helpful to be able to see the process, to follow what steps were taken. Personal experiences, what works, what doesn't ... all these help others. We look forward to further information from Austria on developments and outcomes of this program. Nordic Kennel Union: The Nordic Kennel Union is a cooperative organisation for the Kennel Clubs of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Below we list efforts made to address exaggerations in breeds through the NKU country's BSI. There are six basic criteria defining if a breed should be listed as a high profile breed. Breeds which fulfill these and are thus listed are particularly paid attention to at dog show judging by the judge. Sweden: Svenska Kennelklubben (The Swedish Kennel Club) Breed-Specific Breeding Strategy Program For Judges see: Breed Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. Breed Specific Strategies BSI - Presentation DHW, Dortmund Germany - Göran Bodegård SKK "The BSI program has been routinely applied in Sweden from 2009 – and at present generated more than ten thousand reports. From 2012 the program is embraced and worked through by all the Nordic countries and the latest edition ( NKU BSI 2014) is founded on the compound experience in the Nordic countries regarding the identification of areas of risk in a selected number of high profile breeds during the last decade. The structure of the NKU BSI is thus actually an inventory which allows for a continuous follow up and dynamic revisions of the BSI." SKK Genetic Programmes "Genetic health programmes are one of the tools used by the SKK (the Swedish Kennel Club) to manage hereditary disease. The SKK implemented the use of screening programmes to improve health in Swedish dogs more than 30 years ago. The first programmes concerned hip dysplasia and hereditary eye diseases. More recently, programmes for other heritable conditions, such as elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation and heart disease have been developed. Health programmes are based on breed-specific needs and have been introduced on request from and in consultation with the breed clubs." Finland: Breed Specific Instructions (BSI): Finland 2015 The Finnish Kennel Club has published new Breed-Specific Instructions for dog show judges. The instructions were drafted with the purpose of steering dog show judges to pay closer attention to exaggerated breed types. The new instructions entered into force on 1 June 2015. The Finnish Kennel Club's breeding strategy applies to all breeds. It outlines the main principles and objectives in breeding, and aims to improve genetic health of dogs. Find out what the breeding strategy means in your breed Finnish Kennel Club: General Breeding Strategy The UK: The Kennel Club What the Kennel Club does for Dog Health The report encompasses much of the work undertaken in recent years and includes detailed sections on: How The Kennel Club promotes health through education Initiatives designed to improve health awareness in dog shows How The Kennel Club promotes and progresses scientific research How The Kennel Club encourages responsible breeding of healthy dogs. Breed Watch The info graphic below provides information. Also see: High Profile Breeds Veterinary Health Checks for Best of Breed winners. BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS September 2016 News -- What is the new project at The Kennel Club? Breed Health & Conservation Plan -- The Kennel Club To learn more about the Breed Health and Conservation Project see... BHCP PDF.pdf Kennel Club Launching Breed Health And Conservation Plans The Kennel Club is launching its Breed Health and Conservation Plans project, a dynamic new resource to support breed clubs and individual breeders. This exciting new project will use evidence-based criteria to help identify common breed specific health concerns. Breeders will be provided with information and breeding resources to help them improve the health of their puppies and breed. We at DWN look forward to learning more about the good work done by Dr. Katy Evans and Bonnie Wiles and the UK Breed Clubs! "Breed Health Co-ordinators are individuals working on behalf of breed clubs and councils who are advocates for the health and welfare of their chosen breed." If you have a health related questions concerning a particular breed, we recommend contacting the Breed Health Co-ordinator through the your local Breed club, a list of which is available via the "Find a dog club" link on the Kennel Club's Breed Information Centre. TOOLKITS FOR BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS Website Content Toolkit Website Enhancement Toolkit BREED HEALTH IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
  20. C-BARQ is a behavior assessment tool from the University of Pennsylvania. More info... EXCERPT... information on C-BARQ (February 2018) from https://scistarter.com/project/1035-C-BARQ-and-Fe-BARQ Presented By University of Pennsylvania Goal Standardized evaluations of dog and cat temperament and behavior Task Complete a questionnaire about your dog or cat Where Online only Description The C-BARQ (or Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire) is designed to provide dog owners and professionals with standardized evaluations of canine temperament and behavior. The Fe-BARQ is a new behavioral survey instrument for cat owners. The current versions each consist of 100 questions describing the different ways in which dogs and cats typically respond to common events, situations, and stimuli in their environment. They are simple to use, and can be completed by anyone who is reasonably familiar with their pet's typical, day-to-day behavior. On average, they take about 15-20 minutes to complete. The aim of this project is to collect behavioral data on pet dogs and cats from citizen scientists all over the world. To date, we have collected more than 40,000 records for more than 290 different breeds and mixed breeds of dog and about 5,000 records for cats, but the more owners who contribute to the project, the better. The main goal is to understand variation in temperament and behavior dogs and cats, and the causes of canine and feline behavior problems. The C-BARQ and Fe-BARQ are also available to veterinarians, behavior counselors, researchers, shelters, breeders, and working dog organizations with an interest in evaluating dog and cat behavior. How to Join Sign up at http://vetapps.vet.upenn.edu/cbarq/ and complete the evaluation for your dog(s) or cat(s) Website http://vetapps.vet.upenn.edu/cbarq/ Ideal Age Group High school (14 - 17 years), College, Graduate students, Adults, Families, Seniors Ideal Frequency Just once Average Time Less than an hour Spend the Time indoors Type of Activity Exclusively online .....................................
  21. In this section we will share information, material and links relevant to the education of consumers and the public, in the broadest sense. Our partners will profile events that they have organized. Others planning similar events will find contact information to those with experience and expertise. Education of consumers (dog owners and those considering acquisition of a dog) and the public, may be divided into two categories: 1. Responsible Dog Ownership: which includes educating dog owners appropriate care and handling of their dog, at home and in the community.Topics also include puppy socialization and behavioural issues. 2. Pre-Acquisition: It is important that people understand the responsibilities and challenges inherent in owning a dog before they decide to acquire one. In addition, the breed, type, size, behavior, and other characteristics are important to consider before choosing a pet. (This topic relates to Sourcing and Commercial Breeding, under the Welfare category.)
  22. Brenda Bonnett

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    The Norwegian Kennel Club: Breeding strategies & Ethical rules and regulations for breeding. This document is relevant to Breeding, Breed-Specific Health Strategies and Animal Welfare, in addition to its parent category: Ethical and Breeding Guidelines (and Regulations). Provided by Astrid Indrebø One of our DogWellNet Experts
  24. Brenda Bonnett

    AKC National Parent Club Conference

    And it is so important to have young, vets of the future involved with us! Thanks, Kelly.
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