Reminder: Login to access new features and members-only content!

Register to be a member of our community. Its easy!

Register a new account

Already a member?

Log In here!

Donate

Did you find our content interesting or helpful? Help support the IPFD enhance health, well-being and welfare for dogs everywhere.

Jump to content
  •   Language
  • Sign Up

International Partnership for Dogs - Enhancing Dog Health, Well-Being, and Welfare - Join Us.

Ann Milligan

Administrators
  • Content Count

    1,385
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Ann Milligan

  1. Ian Seath hosted a webinar on Breed Health Improvement Strategies for the Danish Kennel Club on June 11th 2020. An important subject that is more current than ever, where some breeds are faced with a difficult time in relation to health and considerations for the future of the breed. Many thanks to Ian for sharing the video and accompanying slideshow with the DogWellNet community! Thanks goes to Katrine Jeppesen, from the Danish Kennel Club for permission to share this DKK webinar!
  2. 2020... Hélène Denis from the Club du Bulldog Anglais shared the French Kennel Club's BREATH Protocol (BRachycephalic Exercise Aptitude Test for Health) - SCC Service Santé et Gestion des ressources génétiques
  3. This article is a summary we (IPFD) have created describing the issues, the dialogue and challenges around regulatory actions in the Netherlands as of June 2020. The issue is having a polarizing effect across stakeholder groups, and it is our belief that the best results for all dogs are to be achieved by collaborative efforts. IPFD also promotes the considerations of impacts on dogs, breeds, and people when programs are put in place, given the complex nature of issues of health and welfare. This article is a compilation of resources for those who are exploring the situation. Table Of Contents Key points of the situation and background from 2019 Dutch Kennel Club - Breeding Criteria Documentation (English) Stakeholder Responses DogWellNet Coverage and Dog Health Workshops Resources Kennel Club Programs Questions & Moving Forward... (also a good summary of major issues) Some key points: The government of the Netherlands has created a set of criteria about the conformation of short-muzzled dogs and regulations that prohibit breeding of any dog when one is of these is exceeded, regardless of the other criteria. Although the regulations apply to all breeders, as for other issues, pedigree dog breeders who register puppies with the national kennel club (Raad van Beheer, Dutch Kennel Club, DKC) are the most visible and traceable and there is an emphasis on the DKC to enact and enforce these guidelines. And it does not restrict ownership of these dogs or purchase and importation of dogs. Controversies and challenges include: In the 12 designated breeds, pedigreed dog breeders account for a very small proportion of puppies of these breeds being sold in the Netherlands; most are from non-pedigreed breeders and imports. How will the legislation help the majority of dogs? The 12 breeds: i.e., • Affenpinscher • Boston Terrier • English Bulldog • French Bulldog • Griffon Belge • Griffon Bruxellois • Petit Brabançon • Japanese Spaniel • King Charles Spaniel • Pug • Pekingese • Shih Tzu - although sharing some similarities in facial conformation do not have similar risks for Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome, based on available statistics. As stated by the DKC in their response to the proposed legislation: The government's criteria restricting breeding describe exaggerated conformations, which DKC agrees are not desirable and the DKC has concurred with almost all criteria and is supportive in monitoring the breeding stock of pedigree dogs. (See table in Breeding strategy proposal Dutch KC, below). However, the DKC does not agree with the breeding-prohibiting criterion of the Craniofacial Ratio (CFR), stating that, “This criterion would make it impossible to breed certain breeds while the prognostic value and the reproducibility of the CFR are being questioned among scientists.” The scientific evidence for the use of the CFR in the way proposed by the government and their experts is not robust for the breeds studied or should at least be subjected to further review. The government criteria may overemphasize only one aspect of the problems in some of these breeds. Most of the 12 breeds were not part of the key cited study. The DKC is now under pressure from the government and welfare critics and members of the show world for meeting government demands. The situation is being hotly debated through much of the pedigreed dog world and beyond, with some expressing the concern that this regulatory approach is defined in a way to eventually eliminate these breeds and may lead to further restrictions for other breeds. Unfortunately, there are some voices dismissing compelling evidence that there are health problems in certain breeds. It may be that groups who support, in general, attention to the health and welfare of brachychephalics, and have spoken in support of the legislation, may not have carefully considered the evidence or wider impacts. Some are worried that other counties may follow the lead of the Netherlands, without careful consideration. Background: Health and welfare management of brachycephalic dogs is the issue; there are implications are for all dogs and owners. The health and welfare of brachycephalic dogs is a highly complex situation - and yet current reactions and efforts tend to be rather narrow. Positions on various sides seem to becoming entrenched. When narrow or unilateral solutions are enacted without adequate participation of all stakeholders, conflict rather than collaboration or collective actions is often the result. The intensity in published statements and discussions online these days, sometimes extending to hostility, will not lead to an improvement in relations and certainly not to an improvement for the health and welfare of dogs. Responsibility lies with all stakeholders. Simple solutions to complex problems are unlikely to be effective and generally produce unintended consequences. For background and commentary on the recent situation in the Netherlands, please see Dr. Brenda Bonnett's Blog from August 2019, where concerns are expressed that the proposed legislation in the Netherlands was not likely to achieve its goals and the balanced report of the Dutch Kennel Club was presented: Brachycephalic dogs in the Netherlands Since then, the government of the Netherlands has enacted its regulations, to address what they consider to be a pressing need to protect the health and welfare of brachycephalic dogs. Unfortunately, the proposed solutions do not seem to have taken into account the full scientific evidence about the problems nor possible solutions; they may not tackle the full range of concerns; and the focus/enforcement on pedigree breeders may not achieve population-wide benefits for the majority of dogs. While these regulations are under the mandate of one country's government, there is the potential for more harm than good to come from these efforts, with broad implications for owners, dogs, and breeders, both within and beyond the Netherlands. Raad van Beheer (The Dutch Kennel Club, DKC) has translated information on the background and particulars of government regulations regarding breeding brachycephalic dogs - effective in the Netherlands as of May 18, 2020. Links to extensive coverage of the issues are located on the Fokken met kortsnuitige honden page on Raad van Beheer's website. Links to the eight documents that are are available in English (accessed June 2020) are listed below. Below are compiled resources on the 'discussions' and issues as well as resources, including those calling for inclusive and collaborative discussions. This resource page will be updated as the situation evolves. ...
  4. Mission Facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of pedigreed dogs and all dogs worldwide. Vision An enduring global collaboration enhancing dog health, well-being and welfare, and human-dog interactions. Values Dog health, well-being and welfare and human-dog interactions contribute to the quality of life for both species. The world is a better place because we share it with dogs. Dog issues are important around the globe and international sharing and cooperation is needed. Goals The general goals of the IPFD are to: Enhance the health, well-being and welfare of dogs and enrich human-dog interactions To facilitate sharing of knowledge, information, experience and resources across stakeholders (including, e.g., kennel clubs (KCs), veterinary and other professional organisations, health foundations, and others) to improve the health and well-being of purpose-bred dogs. To provide evaluation and interpretation of information to support the actions of stakeholders in dog health, well-being and welfare To facilitate specific actions to improve health and well-being of dogs, including, e.g. to design globally relevant breed-specific breeding strategies. To bring the dog community closer together through DogWellNet.com (below). Objectives The specific objectives of the IPFD shall be to: Create an online resource, i.e., DogWellNet.com to: Provide a clearing house of information, documents and digital resources on all material relevant to dog health and well-being (including, e.g., breeding regulations/recommendations, national/international legislation, health information, etc.) including technology for translation to English and other languages. Promote collaboration among diverse stakeholders interested in dog well-being by increasing the contacts between them, their knowledge of each other’s activities and facilitating cooperation via electronic-communication and other means. Provide evidence- and knowledge-based sharing of information, expertise and resources through evaluation and interpretation by international expert panels. Provide a platform for international collaboration on specific actions, e.g. expert input / validation of tests /procedures and breed-specific strategies to improve health and well-being Create a sustainable organization of relevance to and with credibility across a wide variety of stakeholders in the pedigreed dog world, as well as with concerns for all dogs, everywhere, by: Developing partnerships between KCs and other stakeholders in order to be globally relevant, inclusive and transparent in terms of objectives and actions. Building a financial base for on-going achievement of the vision, goals and objectives. Building networks of experts and supporting their work through online developments. Building a collective of volunteers to contribute to the work of the organisation.
  5. IPFD is a truly "people driven" service organization. Our structure and resources (a modest budget and small group of consultants, volunteers, and Board Members) facilitate the activities of our stakeholders to achieve our individual and collective priorities for the health and welfare of dogs. As a growing, independent voice within the global dog community, we aim to provide the best possible information and advice to assist our stakeholders in making optimal decisions for their members, customers, and breed(s) of interest. IPFD provides and supports a ‘big picture’, balanced, transparent and integrated approach to the complex challenges for dogs and the people who care about them. Our key audiences are, first and foremost, committed and health-conscious breeders, as well as those who support and advise them (kennel and breed club health committees, breeding advisors, veterinarians, researchers etc.), but also include essentially all those involved in the world of dogs including, kennel/breed clubs; dog owners; the pet industry; and more. Our consultants work tirelessly to engage others who embrace our vision and are willing to share their information, expertise, and passion for dogs. We connect with these stakeholders through our online platform, DogWellNet. com; social media; and direct correspondence; in addition to hosting/ attending face-to-face meetings, conferences (e.g. the IPFD IDHWs), seminars, and other educational/networking events.
  6. Reception within the Dog Community Extensive Outreach: IPFD and DogWellNet.com are being received enthusiastically by the dog community (see examples of media coverage in our IPFD News section), and we are frequently used as a resource and our CEO and other IPFD contributors are approached by partner organizations for veterinary meetings, educational events for breeders and judges, and government and regulatory groups to share international perspectives on tough issues. Recent examples include: Outreach Seminar on Healthy Breeding - 42nd World Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress and 23rd FECAVA Eurocongress Breeding healthy dogs: IPFD CEO Dr. Brenda Bonnett talks about the use of breed specific insurance statistics for breeders, breed clubs, veterinarians and other stakeholders AKC-CHF 2017 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference BONNETT - AKC-CHF Presentation - Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs | BONNETT Abstract - CHF June 2017 Collaborative Inspiration: The IDHWs bring together decision-leaders from over 20 countries to improve cooperation on shared goals and to promote needed actions. Read: Moving from information and collaboration to action: report from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Paris in April 2017 Trusted Expertise - An Independent Voice: We are also increasingly viewed as an important independent voice - with a view of the entire landscape - such as during recent discussions on genetics and genomics for dogs. Join us: IPFD encourages potential contributors, collaborators, sponsors, and others in the dog world to contact us (see below) to explore ways for us to work together in furthering the health, welfare, and well-being of dogs.
  7. See the September 2016 IPFD Presentation to the Kennel Club's Breed Health Coordinators 2.45 MB · 0 downloads IPFD_Presentation to KC BHCs Sept 2016_post meeting notes_for DWN-web.pdf Are you involved in a dog club for your breed? Would you like to share information from your kennel club, breed club or country with DogWellNet.com? Already a DogWellNet.com Member? Sign In, make sure your profile is up-to-date and see Next Steps, below. Visiting us as a guest? Sign Up to participate. Sign Up is open to the public and new participants automatically become DogWellnet.com Members Members of DogWellNet have access to content including our partner organizations' work on breed management strategies, articles and health data on breeds located throughout the world. Members can participate in Member Forums, may comment on material and have access to some content that is not available to those viewing the site as a guest. Register at http://dogwellnet.com/register/ to become a DogWellNet Member! Please make sure you fill in your profile. Help is available to set up your account. Next Steps: Contact us if you want to actively participate in providing content. How? Contact us at https://dogwellnet.com/contact/ Who? We are especially keen to connect with Breed Club or other Health Committee representatives or others looking at health and breeding issues. Why? Our goal is to facilitate the sharing of expertise and resources and to profile the good work done being done throughout the dog world with the focus on 'Sharing and Caring for Dogs'. What? Have a look through information in the Pedigreed Dogs database, e.g. check out the Irish Wolfhound to see the type of information we are trying to build. Do you have breed-specific information to share - links, health surveys, seminar presentations, breed management strategies (e.g. RAS and JTO), research papers or projects, etc. etc. A key goal of DogWellNet.com is to promote and facilitate international collaboration. Our purpose is to provide expert commentary and guidance in interpretation and use of information pertaining to dog health and welfare topics and issues. JOIN US! to collaborate with the global dog world on DogWellNet.com - the web platform of the International Partnership for Dogs - as we work to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of dogs.
  8. IPFD is truly a "people driven" service organization. We allocate the bulk of our financial resources to maintain a small but dedicated team of consultants to manage our modest resources and facilitate the activities of our stakeholders, with the aim of achieving our collective goals. Your generous donation to support IPFD and its programs helps ensure our long-term sustainability and supports ongoing efforts to create an enduring global collaboration that enhances the health, well-being, and welfare of all dogs worldwide. By supporting the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs initiative you can help us improve standardization of, and access to, robust genetic testing to support health improvements and a sustainable future for healthy dogs.
  9. AUTHOR: HELLE FRIIS PROSCHOWSKY, DVM, PH.D., SPECIAL CONSULTANT, THE DANISH KENNEL CLUB (DKC) See: https://www.dachshund-ivdd.uk/what-is-ivdd/danish-ivdd-paper-2019/ PDF version: https://www.dachshund-ivdd.uk/app/download/11009159/Herniated+discs+HFP+2019+v4.pdf IVDD is explored in this concise presentation which was originally published in the March 2019 issue of the Danish Kennel Club magazine (HUNDEN). Translated version by Frøydis Hardeng and Ian Seath..
  10. See the Blog "Every Step We Take".
  11. 2020... The Brachycephalic Working Group has posted resources on Bulldogs, French Bulldogs & Pugs... VetCompass developed infographics, which summarise brachycephalic breed research... What's available? Bulldogs in the UK: Facing up to some challenges + full paper; French Bulldogs: Soaring UK popularity + full paper; Pugs: Weighing up health priorities + full paper
  12. comment doesn't belong here - not an IPFD partner or affiliate website
  13. The Extremes of Conformation Theme has been discussed at the Dog Health Workshops held in 2012, 2015, 2017 and 2019. This document provides a timeline-based group of resources available on DogWellNet including articles, blogs and links to plenary presentations from the workshops. brachy - extremes theme - dwn - idhw - 1-4 - timeline.pdf During the past decade a great deal has been accomplished to address health and welfare issues that relate to conformation extremes across breeds. Particular focus has been paid to health challenges present in the short muzzled breeds, several of which have become exceedingly popular in recent years. Efforts have included scientific research, Kennel and Breed Club educational programs, involvements by veterinary associations located throughout the world and governmental approaches to regulating breeds provide an informed view of how extremes can impact health and welfare of dogs - views come from different stakeholder groups. We at DWN are pleased to be a part of sharing information from the Dog Health Workshops as well as other collected resources with the community.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.