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Found 34 results

  1. In addition to the Theme:Outline - here some reading we hope you will do before coming to the Workshop. If you aren't acquainted with it, please see: the Harmonization Project Initiative description. For further/preparatory reading, you might look at a similar, more extensive developement for humans: Eurogentest which, for searching for labs and tests will take you to Orphanet. ICAR has an accreditation program for labs doing cattle testing. Another accreditation scheme in use is the Standards and Guidelines from the American College of Medical Genetics in conjunction with the College of American Pathologists. Although these are for human genetic diagnostic testing, there is a lot of good material in here that ensures quality between laboratories and across the discipline. General Standards and Guidelines for Clinical Genetics Laboratories General Policies Policies specific to Clinical Molecular Genetics You will receive an Attendee list in your package at the workshop. But here is the Full Attendee List (by Theme): Attendee List IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop.pdf And many further resources are on DogWellNet.com... not required reading... but or your information.
  2. General Goals and Outcomes - all Themes: By the conclusion of the 3rd IDHW participants should leave with a clear sense of key decisions on priorities / needs within the theme; remaining gaps/ challenges/ controversies; List of specific tasks/ actions to be undertaken over the next two years, by whom; and a clear understanding of how they, personally, will help achieve the desired outcomes. Please see: 3rd IDHW_Program Overview, Schedule, Themes and Speakers for further information. Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (Harmonization/ Genetics) Theme Working Group Coordinator(s): Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi, USA; Brenda Bonnett, Canada Resource persons: Wim van Haeringen, Netherlands, Cathryn Mellersh, UK Facilitator(s): Diane Brown, USA Notetaker: Ambre Jaraud, France Keys to The Harmonization/ Genetics Theme: In previous Dog Health Workshops, it was recognised that the proliferation of genetic tests, and test providers available paired with the lack of standardisation or regulation on a global scale is a huge concern. There is an urgent need for consumers to be able to access a resource to elucidate which genetic testing providers are robust, and what genetic tests options are applicable to improvement of dog health and welfare. The IPFD in collaboration with multiple stakeholders has developed a prototype platform to catalogue quality measures (QMs) for genetic testing providers. In addition, the IPFD and collaborators are working to develop balanced, independent reviews of genetic tests and their recommended usage, and support the development of proficiency testing. Some of the Keys we hope to address in this session: Increase input on the development, and content of the prototype (i.e. identifying and prioritizing QMs) Engage further sponsors, collaborators, and Experts to address the challenges of The Tri-ad: Genetic Testing Providers: What describes quality and reliability? Tests: What describes quality and reliability? Genetic Counselling – the next steps needed for phase 2. Develop working parties to address specific Tri-ad issues Clearly identify the needs and desires of the primary users: owners, breeders, commercial test providers, researchers, breed clubs, etc. Continue reading below or download PDF 3rd IDHW Guide for Participants_Harmonization_12April2017.docx
  3. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is to be commended on its attention to the complex and quickly evolving world of genetic testing and dog breeding! Their article on: Genetic panel testing for breeds and hereditary disorders promises insights for dog owners, breeders, and veterinarians: Unlocking the genetic secrets of your dog in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) AVMA's new policy encourages research, continuing education, and outreach on inherited disorders in companion animals: AVMA passes policy on responsible pet breeding The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) is a multi-stakeholder, non-profit organization whose mission is to bring the global dog world together to share information and resources and to take actions to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of dogs. As the JAVMA article mentions, a major initiative is the IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs. Project sponsors include the IPFD Partners, including various national kennel clubs, Agria Animal Insurance (Sweden and UK), the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, American Kennel Club-Canine Health Foundation, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) and their Hereditary Disease Committee, as well as various commercial test providers including, two mentioned in the JAVMA article, e.g. Mars Veterinary and Genoscoper. The full list of current sponsors and an overview of the Harmonization initiative are available (elsewhere) on DogWellNet.com, the web platform of the IPFD. Genetic testing is one of the most complex issues facing dog owners, breeders and veterinarians. Owners of individual dogs may, as described in the article, access ‘DNA testing’ to look at a dog’s parentage, breed ancestry; to determine a general list of health risks; or to find out information on a specific clinical issue. This may be done for interest or diagnostic information. However, for breeders of dogs there are added layers of complexity that may be amplified by the burgeoning availability of panel tests. It’s easy to say breeders should do all available tests. But is that practical or even the best approach? A breeder may spend several hundreds of dollars on genetic testing, but their breed or kennel club may be telling them they must also screen for important diseases not covered by genetic tests, e.g. hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, eye conditions. And they must try to breed a dog with good behaviour and appropriate breed characteristics, while, hopefully also paying attention to genetic diversity and other measures of ‘wellness’ of the breed, as a whole. The prospect is daunting. The reality is that the number of genetic tests available for dogs is increasing at an exponential rate; many tests coming out of research on important human diseases, and often the actual risk indicated by a test result and/ or the relevance for the overall health of the dog is unclear. In some countries, it is recommended against or even illegal to breed an animal that has a known abnormality or risk for disease. Positive results from a huge panel of genetic tests, even if some of those tests have not been validated for that breed, may unnecessarily preclude that animal from breeding. In some countries, there are an increasing frequency of litigation against breeders, sometimes unrealistically holding them accountable for any and every problem a dog may experience. But we are talking about biological organisms – and no animal – human or dog or other – can be bred to eliminate any possibility of disease. Some opponents of purebred dogs will have little sympathy for the conscientious breeder saying it is impossible to test for everything. But purebred and pedigreed dogs are worth sustaining. And more importantly, what is the alternative? We know that in most countries, a vast proportion of the demand for dogs is supplied by commercial breeders, many of whom may not have the health and welfare of their breeding animals or puppies as a first priority. There are increasing numbers of designer/ crossbreed dogs and a tendency to believe that any and all mixed breed dogs are healthier than any and all pedigreed dogs. Both of these categories of breeders tend to operate outside the oversight of authorities, breed clubs or kennel clubs who try to have a holistic view of health, behaviour and welfare. The AVMA statement on breeding reflects some similar concerns. Suffice it to say the complexity of the world of dog health and breeding can be almost overwhelming. As for genetic testing, the optimism about the great potential offered by panel tests, e.g., must be tempered by the reality that some tests within a panel may not be validated or meaningful for a given breed or condition. In the JAVMA article, both Dr. Giger and Dr. Bell express a need for judicious use of tests. Many commercial test providers offer information on the interpretation and application of test results, at least for the individual owner or dog, if not for use in breeding decisions. But we must understand that there is a strong profit-based drive behind many of these offerings, reflected by increasing numbers of commercial entities offering tests. The widespread and sophisticated marketing, e.g. online, makes this world even more challenging for consumers to navigate. The IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs (Harmonization) initiative grew out of international collaborative efforts to address tough issues like: How can a consumer recognize a good quality from poorer quality labs or commercial test providers? How does an owner or breeder make an informed decision about the best product for their dog/ situation? How can this be done keeping a holistic view on all issues of health and welfare? How can veterinarians possibly keep up with all these new developments? Where can consumers and veterinarians get expert opinions truly independent from commercial interests? How can we ensure that the terrific potential for genetic testing to improve health in dogs is not negatively impacted by all these challenges? The Harmonization initiative will be one Theme at the IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, hosted by the French Kennel Club in Paris, France, 21-23 April 2017. This meeting involves decision-leaders in the dog world, from many stakeholder groups, who come together to identify priorities and actions that need international collaboration. In addition to genetic testing, themes include Breed-Specific Health Programs; Behaviour and Welfare; Education and Communication (focus on antimicrobial resistance/ prudent use of antimicrobials); Numbers/ Quantitative Data on dogs and health; and Health Issues of Extreme Conformation. Further information on the background, program, themes and goals, including registration information is available on the Workshop website and elsewhere on DogWellNet.com. Our most recent Collaborating Partner, is the Canine Genetics and Epidemiology journal and they will be on hand at the workshop and will help support dissemination of information from the workshop. The IPFD, their partners and collaborators, together with sponsors of the Harmonization initiative – including commercial test providers who have stepped forward to take a leadership role - are, in the first phase, creating a prototype of a database of quality for commercial test providers. We recognize the leadership of the WSAVA. We hope to engage other veterinary organizations as their input will be key, especially as we develop the Expert Panels who will provide collective, valid and balanced advice on tests, testing and application as we move into the next phases of the Harmonization initiative. The Harmonization of Genetic Testing in Dogs will succeed through collaborative, multi-stakeholder, international participation to address the complex issues of genetic testing for dogs with an aim to capitalize on the great potential of technological developments to improve dog health and to support consumers. For further information please contact : Brenda Bonnett, CEO IPFD; brenda.bonnett@ipfdogs.com Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi, Project Director; Aimee.Llewellyn-Zaidi@ipfdogs.com
  4. The Animal Health Trust exists to fight disease and injury in animals. Thanks to our pioneering work improving diagnosis, treatment and prevention, horses, dogs and cats are living healthier, happier lives – in the UK and across the world. The Animal Health Trust is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  5. The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) is an association of associations. Its membership is made up of veterinary organisations from all over the world, which are concerned with companion animals. The Hereditary Diseases Committee of the WSAVA is collaborating on the IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs initiative. Website: www.wsava.org
  6. IPFD will oversee a multi-stakeholder, collaborative effort to create an open access, sustainable online resource that will: Catalog information provided voluntarily from commercial test providers (CTPs) for genetic testing (GT) in dogs. Describe expertise, quality assurance, activities and resources; host expert panel reviews of genetic tests; Coordinate a program for standardized proficiency testing and potentially peer review and audit; Collate/assemble existing and new resources for genetic counselling and education; and provide the foundation for further developments. Our Steering Committee includes: Brenda Bonnett, CEO, IPFD; Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi, Harmonization Project Director, IPFD; Diane Brown, AKC Canine Health Foundation; Matthew Breen, North Carolina State University; Cathryn Mellersh, Animal Health Trust; Sofia Malm, Swedish Kennel Club; Wim van Haeringen, VHL Genetics, Netherlands; Sue Pearce-Kelling, Optigen; and Eddie Dzuik; Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). IPFD, our Partners and other stakeholders in this initiative recognize the input and work of many other experts and organizations in addressing the use of DNA tests in dogs. The Harmonization initiative is working to further engage numerous experts to participate in panels to develop the resource, provide evaluation of tests and work to advance genetic counseling. IPFD is actively engaging Leadership Sponsors to help develop a prototype to be presented at the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop. During the breakout session for this Theme we will look for input on the prototype and further discussion on how to move forward on this international collaboration. Some of our key Partners and Leadership Sponsors (more coming soon): Read more about IPFD Partners and Sponsors Other potential sponsors and collaborators are welcome to contact us to explore opportunities. Contact: IPFD CEO Brenda.Bonnett@ipfdogs.com or Project Director Aimee.Llewellyn-Zaidi@ipfdogs.com “Mars Veterinary and the Mars Veterinary logo are trademarks of Mars, Incorporated and its affiliates. Used with permission.”
  7. Mars Veterinary is a business unit of Mars Petcare, the world’s largest pet care provider. Their mission is to facilitate responsible pet care by enhancing the well-being and relationship between pets, pet owners, breeders, shelters and veterinarians through valuable insights into pets as individuals. Mars Veterinary is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  8. Many thanks to the AKC-CHF and our other sponsors for supporting the collaborative Harmonization of Genetic Testing initiative!!! See the Dog News Annual Issue for the complete article.
  9. Below we present a collection of links and excerpts from media coverage of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs initiative. We will be adding more content as media articles are published.
  10. The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) announces the “Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs” initiative: to support the appropriate selection and use of DNA testing in dog health and breeding decisions The ever-increasing emergence of new canine DNA tests and testing laboratories has made choosing quality DNA testing providers and the right DNA tests for health and breeding decisions increasingly challenging for many owners, breeders and veterinarians. Working with a wide-spectrum of stakeholders in dog health, the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) "Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs" initiative will provide practical support to address these challenges.
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  15. I am very pleased to be joining the IPFD as project manager of the Harmonization of Genetic Testing of Dogs.  With the aim of Improving standardization of, and access to, robust genetic testing to support health improvements and ensure a sustainable future for healthy dogs.”

  16. Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. A general reflection is that the increasing and necessary focus on health and soundness in purebred dogs contains an increasing demand for advanced knowledge about excellent breed type in judges. Show judges are expected to preserve breed type of the purebred dogs – not only the health and life of the dogs with pedigrees. Link: http://www.skk.se/Global/Dokument/Utstallning/special-breed-specific-instructions-A8.pdf also in our Downloads section. ... with permission from Dr Göran Bodegård MD PhD Chairman of the BSI group of the Swedish Kennel Club, Stockholm, Sweden
  17. We're Genoscoper - the specialists in canine genetics and animal DNA testing. We offer solutions to help you make informed decisions about pet care and breeding, through comprehensive testing services and improved DNA diagnostics, with the most advanced BioIT. Genoscoper is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  18. Many national kennel clubs, other cynological organizations (e.g. breed clubs) have developed guidelines, approaches or programs to: describe and evaluate the health of specific breeds outline guidelines or regulations for screening tests or other assessments on potential breeding dogs raise awareness about issues in a given breed. These programs take different forms in different countries. In this section we will provide information on various approaches and programs and direct you to online resources. For general guidelines (not breed-specific) see also: country-specific General Breeding and Ethical Guidelines. Countries: Austria: Austrian Kennel Club - Response to Animal Welfare Legislation The Austrian Kennel Club ( Österreichische Kynologenverband - ÖKV ) initiated a project, "Konterqual", to address legislative concerns. Sharing work like this can help to inform other kennel clubs and countries dealing with similar issues. In addition to presenting the facts and outcomes, it is so helpful to be able to see the process, to follow what steps were taken. Personal experiences, what works, what doesn't ... all these help others. We look forward to further information from Austria on developments and outcomes of this program. Nordic Kennel Union: The Nordic Kennel Union is a cooperative organisation for the Kennel Clubs of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Below we list efforts made to address exaggerations in breeds through the NKU country's BSI. There are six basic criteria defining if a breed should be listed as a high profile breed. Breeds which fulfill these and are thus listed are particularly paid attention to at dog show judging by the judge. Sweden: Svenska Kennelklubben (The Swedish Kennel Club) Breed-Specific Breeding Strategy Program For Judges see: Breed Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. Breed Specific Strategies BSI - Presentation DHW, Dortmund Germany - Göran Bodegård SKK "The BSI program has been routinely applied in Sweden from 2009 – and at present generated more than ten thousand reports. From 2012 the program is embraced and worked through by all the Nordic countries and the latest edition ( NKU BSI 2014) is founded on the compound experience in the Nordic countries regarding the identification of areas of risk in a selected number of high profile breeds during the last decade. The structure of the NKU BSI is thus actually an inventory which allows for a continuous follow up and dynamic revisions of the BSI." SKK Genetic Programmes "Genetic health programmes are one of the tools used by the SKK (the Swedish Kennel Club) to manage hereditary disease. The SKK implemented the use of screening programmes to improve health in Swedish dogs more than 30 years ago. The first programmes concerned hip dysplasia and hereditary eye diseases. More recently, programmes for other heritable conditions, such as elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation and heart disease have been developed. Health programmes are based on breed-specific needs and have been introduced on request from and in consultation with the breed clubs." Finland: Breed Specific Instructions (BSI): Finland 2015 The Finnish Kennel Club has published new Breed-Specific Instructions for dog show judges. The instructions were drafted with the purpose of steering dog show judges to pay closer attention to exaggerated breed types. The new instructions entered into force on 1 June 2015. The UK: The Kennel Club What the Kennel Club does for Dog Health The report encompasses much of the work undertaken in recent years and includes detailed sections on: How The Kennel Club promotes health through education Initiatives designed to improve health awareness in dog shows How The Kennel Club promotes and progresses scientific research How The Kennel Club encourages responsible breeding of healthy dogs. Breed Watch The info graphic below provides information. For Judges see: The Breed Watch Booklet - A Judge's guide to particular points of concern for individual breeds. Also see: High Profile Breeds Veterinary Health Checks for Best of Breed winners. BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS September 2016 News -- What is the new project at The Kennel Club? Breed Health & Conservation Plan -- The Kennel Club To learn more about the Breed Health and Conservation Project see... BHCP PDF.pdf Kennel Club Launching Breed Health And Conservation Plans The Kennel Club is launching its Breed Health and Conservation Plans project, a dynamic new resource to support breed clubs and individual breeders. This exciting new project will use evidence-based criteria to help identify common breed specific health concerns. Breeders will be provided with information and breeding resources to help them improve the health of their puppies and breed. We at DWN look forward to learning more about the good work done by Dr. Katy Evans and Bonnie Wiles and the UK Breed Clubs! "Breed Health Co-ordinators are individuals working on behalf of breed clubs and councils who are advocates for the health and welfare of their chosen breed." If you have a health related questions concerning a particular breed, we recommend contacting the Breed Health Co-ordinator through the your local Breed club, a list of which is available via the "Find a dog club" link on the Kennel Club's Breed Information Centre. TOOLKITS FOR BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS Website Content Toolkit Website Enhancement Toolkit BREED HEALTH IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
  19. Approaching fast – but there are still places available at the IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop hosted by the French Kennel Club in Paris 21-23 April 2017 - Register here! Why not join us in Paris for a truly interactive working meeting of international decision-leaders in dog health and welfare. We already have people registered from over 20 countries, including breeders, kennel club health advisors, communication experts, Directors and Presidents; veterinarians; researchers; veterinary organizations; welfare organizations; judges; geneticists; industry representatives; and more. Share your information, expertise and experience and be part of global actions to improve the health, well-being and welfare of dogs. Format: There are short plenary talks early on Saturday. From 10:45 on Saturday until 2 pm on Sunday the focus is on interactive breakout sessions designed to identify priorities, needs and actions need to advance within six Themes. Each attendee participates in one theme; as well as plenary sharing sessions to share goals and convergence across themes and a final summary to identify key actions moving forward toward the 4th IDHW (in the UK in 2019). Please see the Workshop website to register and for more information on the venue and program; including the listing of internationally recognized speakers who will deliver our short but powerful plenary talks. Here are the Themes: Breed-Specific Health Strategies: By breed, nationally and internationally. Exaggerations And Extremes In Dog Conformation: Health, welfare and breeding considerations; latest national and international efforts. IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative: Selection, evaluation and application of genetic testing Behaviour and Welfare: How can we better integrate concepts of welfare, behaviour and health in breeding and raising dogs? Education and Communication - Antimicrobial Resistance/ Prudent Use of Antibiotics: How can international collaboration support education and communication within and across stakeholder groups (esp. between veterinarians and breeders). Show Me The Numbers: Integrating information from various sources for prevalence, risks and other population-level information Participate and make a difference for dogs! Need more information? Contact: Brenda Bonnett, CEO IPFD brenda.bonnett@ipfdogs.com Anne Mary Chimion, SCC anne-mary.chimion@centrale-canine.fr
  20. The Canine Health Foundation is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  21. Neogen Genomics operations deliver innovative, affordable DNA testing for the discovery and commercial application of genomic advances that enhance the safety and abundance of life. Neogen Genomics is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  22. Our mission is to safeguard the health and wellbeing of your pet with fully personalised, breed-specific care. Orivet was founded on the premise that each and every pet is unique, with its own set of specific traits, behaviours, genetic health needs and inherent risks. We work with pet owners, breeders and vets to provide completely personalised products and services that treat and care for pets as the unique individuals they are, taking into account each pet’s genetic makeup, age, sex and lifestyle. Through this we aim to encourage the development of a deep, genuine and lasting bond between pets and their owners. Orivet is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  23. Utilising the latest DNA technologies has enabled the VHLGenetics to grow exponentially since 1993. Our experienced laboratories offer more than 1,000 routine DNA tests for animals, plants and microorganisms. The three locations offer the same DNA services, and the number of DNA tests available is routinely increased by the newest developments in the field. VHLGenetics is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  24. Mars Veterinary is a business unit of Mars Petcare, the world’s largest pet care provider. Their mission is to facilitate responsible pet care by enhancing the well-being and relationship between pets, pet owners, breeders, shelters and veterinarians through valuable insights into pets as individuals. Mars Veterinary is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.
  25. Sentinel Biomedical is a pioneering comparative health company committed to research and scientific innovation. The company’s primary focus is investigating canine cancers and identifying biological changes and environmental influences that may be shared with human cancers, making canines true watchdogs in the area of human health. Sentinel Biomedical is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.