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Found 81 results

  1. Last weekend I was honored to participate in the 2017 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference presented by the AKC Canine Health Foundation and Nestlé Purina PetCare, in St. Louis, Missouri. It is always great to interact with breeders and club reps that are so committed to the health and welfare of their dogs and their breeds. This meeting is a mix of breeders (106 parent clubs represented!), vets, and researchers and includes Board members from some of the collaborating organizations who sponsor research, including IPFD Partners and Sponsors: the AKC, the AKC-CHF and the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). The OFA sponsored 32 veterinary students to attend the meeting. Our IPFD 2016 Student Kelly Arthur was among the participants! The research covered a wide array of key topics - from ticks and infectious disease - epilepsy - latest developments in cancer - to issues of reproduction (see list of speakers and topics, below). What an impressive panel of speakers and internationally renowned researchers. It was great to see two of our speakers from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Jason Stull and Rowena Packer, as well as numerous others who participated in that meeting. It certainly feels like the international community of those committed to dog health, well-being and welfare is going strong! Thanks to the many people who stopped by the IPFD table to talk to us about our organization, DogWellNet.com and especially the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs initiative (and to grab some chocolate to keep their energy up!). Special thanks to CA Sharpe, from our IPFD Collaborating Partner Australian Shepherd Health & Genetics Institute (ASHGI) for helping me out at the table. It was very gratifying for me to hear someone else talking so enthusiastically about our efforts. Congrats to AKC-CHF for their continued strength and leadership; for promoting multi-disciplinary interaction; and for an exciting conference. Attached is the PDF of the slides of my talk (slightly altered, of course) and the abstract. BONNETT - AKC-CHF Presentation - Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs BONNETT Abstract - CHF June 2017 The 2017 AKC-CHF Conference Program included presentations on the following topics... Lymphoma & Epigenetics - Jeffrey Bryan, DVM, PhD, DACVIM-Oncology Lymphoma & Flow Cytometry - Anne Avery, VMD, PhD Chemotherapy & FortiFlora® - Korinn Saker DVM, PhD, DACVN Genetics of Cancer/Lymphoma - Matthew Breen, PhD Diet & Rehabilitation - Wendy Baltzer DVM, PhD, DACVS Genetic Predisposition to Infections - Urs Giger, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DECVCP Lyme Disease - Jason Stull, VMD, PhD, DACVPM Tick-Borne Disease - Ed Breitschwerdt, DVM, DACVIM (*Keynote) Ehrlichia & Lymphocytosis - Anne Avery, VMD, PhD Canine Cognition - Bill Milgram, PhD Genetics of Epilepsy - Gary Johnson, DVM, PhD Epilepsy & the Microbiome - Karen Munana, DVM, PhD, DACVIM-Neurology Epilepsy & Nutrition - Rowena Packer, PhD IPFD: Harmonization of Laboratory Genetic Testing for Dogs - Brenda Bonnett, DVM, PhD Semen Evaluation, Quality, and Effects of Aging - Stuart Meyers, DVM, PhD, DACT Brucella Update - Angela Arenas, DVM, PhD, DACVP Pyometra - Marco Coutinho da Silva, DVM, PhD, DACT New for 2017! Panel discussions with our speakers on: Canine Lymphoma Tick-Borne Diseases Epilepsy Reproductive Diseases AKC-CHF Facebook
  2. Antimicrobial resistant infections can be lethal to immunocompromised dogs such as puppies and seniors. It is important that we use antimicrobials properly. The purpose of this article is to: Provide strategies to help prevent development of resistant infections while keeping your dog’s health as the number one priority. Highlight special considerations organized by life stages of the dog - from breeding and whelping to puppyhood to senior years. Let's not be breeding super bugs when we are breeding dogs!
  3. PSA to all of the breeders. Please avoid using antibiotics during pregnancy and whelping unless absolutely necessary. Through breeding your dogs with antibiotics, you are also breeding super bugs. Antibiotics can also be detrimental to growth and development of the puppy. Some antibiotics even cause fetal death. Always consult your veterinarian before using antibiotics.
  4. 21 downloads

    This document is from a presentation which Katariina Mäki gave in August 2014 at the World Dog Show. It is an overview of the work the Finnish Kennel Club is doing in order to promote genetic health of dogs. The presentation was open for anyone interested.
  5. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    THIS IS AN OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE - YOU MAY READ OR DOWNLOAD THE ARTICLE AS PDF FROM THE PUBLISHER'S WEBSITE. Article links: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0172918 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0172918&type=printable (PDF) A. M. Oberbauer1*, G. G. Keller2, T. R. Famula1 1 Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA United States of America, 2 Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Columbia, MO United States of America "The objectives of the present study were to characterize the influence of non-compulsory selection on phenotypic radiographic assessment of hip and elbow conformation over time. Dog breeds that were most highly participatory in a voluntary United States radiographic screening process for hips and elbows were evaluated for improvement, whether maternal or paternal selection was more responsible for any observed progress, whether some breeds prove more amenable to selection than others, and whether selection against one orthopedic disorder yielded concomitant improvement in the other." Abstract "Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and elbow dysplasia (ED) impact the health and welfare of all dogs. The first formally organized assessment scheme to improve canine health centered on reducing the prevalence of these orthopedic disorders. Phenotypic screening of jointconformation remains the currently available strategy for breeders to make selection decisions. The present study evaluated the efficacy of employing phenotypic selection on breed improvement of hips and elbows using the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals complete database spanning the 1970±2015 time period. Sixty breeds having more than 1000 unique hip evaluations and 500 elbow evaluations (1,056,852 and 275,129 hip and elbow records, respectively) were interrogated to derive phenotypic improvement, sex and age at time of assessment effects, correlation between the two joints, heritability estimates, estimated breeding values (EBV), and effectiveness of maternal/paternal selection. The data demonstrated that there has been overall improvement in hip and elbow conformation with a reduction in EBV for disease liability, although the breeds differed in the magnitude of the response to selection. Heritabilities also differed substantially across the breeds as did the correlation of the joints; in the absence of a universal association of these differences with breed size, popularity, or participation in screening, it appears that the breeds themselves vary in genetic control. There was subtle, though again breed specific, impact of sex and older ages on CHD and ED. There was greater paternal impact on a reduction of CHD. In the absence of direct genetic tests for either of these two diseases, phenotypic selection has proven to be effective. Furthermore, the data underscore thatselection schemes must be breed specific and that it is likely the genetic profiles will be unique across the breeds for these two conditions. Despite the advances achieved with phenotypic selection, incorporation of EBVs into selection schemes should accelerate advances in hip and elbow improvement." From the Discussion... "The data presented here confirms that employing phenotypic health information and selecting sires and dams from pedigrees free from dysplasia does reduce the condition. Acceptance of using health information in breeding decisions is growing. A 2004 study of Dutch Boxer breeders [75] indicated that 32% of the breeders utilized genetic information, expressed as an odds ratio of particular sire-dam combinations producing deleterious health traits, in their mate selections. A recent report assessing selection practices among Australian dog breeders indicated that the ªgenetics and healthº attribute of potential dams was one of the top four decision components [76]; despite this weighting in dam selection some breeders failed to practice health screening, including for CHD. As selection tools for health characteristics improve, using those will demonstrably improve the health of dogs."
  6. Breed health managment schemes for breeders and owners present challenges. Genetic health programmes are one of the tools used by kennel clubs and breeders to manage and decrease the incidence of hereditary disease in dogs.
  7. Maintaining and Improving Breeds Jerold S Bell DVM, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University jerold.bell@tufts.edu (This article was published in the September 2016 Perspectives – AKC Delegates Newsletter. It can be reproduced with the permission of the author.)
  8. Cathryn Mellersh, Animal Health Trust, November 2011 What Is a Carrier? Breeding with Carriers Mutation Frequency Breeding Advice
  9. IPFD Student Project 2016 'A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs' - Overview The first IPFD Student Project is underway and our student, Kelly Arthur, has developed articles, a blog, and interactive modules to share with the DogWellNet community. Kelly is a 3rd year veterinary student from Colorado State University and her project is generously supported by the Skippy Frank Fund. Below is an overview of the scope of Kelly’s completed project.
  10. An exciting, multidisciplinary event has just concluded in London, UK. Attended by renowned scientists and researchers from fields including genetics, behaviour, epidemiology, animal breeding and more as well as veterinarians and behavior practictioners from around the world, this event was designed to promote international awareness, interest and collaboration. Behavior of dogs is a complex interplay of genetic and environmental - dog and human factors and can best be addressed by interaction and collaboration. Information on topics and presentations is now available on their site: Canine Behaviour and Genetics Presentation PDFs (website and presentations are not currently available 5-11-2017) And further discussion below ... This article was edited on 5-11-2017; please note, some referenced content/links are no longer available.
  11. Version 1.0.0

    19 downloads

    The Intersection of Welfare and Behaviour in Dogs and Relation to Health and Breeding Paula Boyden BVetMedMRCVS Dogs Trust
  12. "Responsible breeders will consider the health of their puppies to be a priority, increasing the probability that healthy puppies will go on to live long and happy lives. This page includes sections on factors to consider when breeding dogs for health, including breeding from DNA tested dogs and inbreeding." The Kennel Club Advice and Information for Breeders
  13. Alan’s passion for Bullmastiffs, and purebred dogs in general, is shared by his wife, Chris Lezotte. They have been active breeders and exhibitors for 30 years, producing 165 champions including BIS , BISS, and five generations of Group winners under the HappyLegs, Registered prefix. Alan is the AKC Delegate from the American Bullmastiff Association and its current president.
  14. This article contains information from the AKC's Delegate's newsletter, Perspectives along with an article from OFA, How the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is tackling inherited disorders in the USA: Using hip and elbow dysplasia as examples. We are delighted to share an article by Dr. Jerold S. Bell, DVM along with a video presentation given on the topic, Maintaining and Improving Breeds. DWN extends our thanks to Dr. Jerold S. Bell & Edmund Dziuk for sharing with the DWN community!
  15. The English Bulldog Club in France shares their breed management strategies with the DWN community. The role of a breed club and approaches to breed management for a popular dog breed are covered in this document. A 'state of mind' exists in among the members and leadership of the Club du Bulldog Anglais to ensure the breed's health and welfare are addressed. See below for a link to The Club du Bulldog Anglais Breed Management Strategy Overview. Our thanks goes to Hélène Denis, for sharing this information with the DWN community.
  16. 2016 News from The French Kennel Club... The SCC is proud to present the 5-generation pedigree In 2012 the work of the Breeding commission enabled the SCC to set up birth certificates and 3-generation pedigrees « enriched » with information about DNA (identification, parentage), selection rating, health and performances (breed standard compliance and work). In 2016 the SCC expanded upon the initial work done to 5-generation pedigrees containing even more key genealogical information.
  17. There is much to ponder when considering breeding dog ethical questions including: There is always another perspective to hear and side to discuss related to welfare and ethics. Although there is a middle ground, those with the loudest voice and most extreme views appear to influence the breeding dog debate. Veterinarians seem to be under-represented in this public forum. Exploring options: One Welfare’s Brachycephalic Dog Scenario highlights some of the health challenges associated with breeding brachycephalic dogs. It portrays a situation that veterinarians in small animal practice face — advising a client on surgical correction of anatomic abnormalities of brachycephalic breeds — elongated soft palate, stenotic nares, a hypoplastic trachea, and everted laryngeal saccules.
  18. One Welfare is a collaborative effort of veterinary schools in Australia and New Zealand to engage the veterinary community in animal welfare discourse. Using a scenario-based teaching module, One Welfare introduces different ways of thinking about welfare and investigates how personal bias impacts these dialogues.
  19. The Finnish Kennel Club continues to inspire us! Finland is a country of about five and half million people and with the highest ratio of dogs to people. They are fiercely proud of their historical association with dogs - and so they should be. It is a country where a high percentage of dogs are still used for their original purpose. The dog continues to be integrated closely with Finnish culture. And that wonderful, deep, and long history is now celebrated online with the Finnish Canine Museum. ... but I'm not giving you the link yet... once you go you may not come back! This has to be a brilliant accomplishment – for dogs and for the new age of museums. The amount of information is impressive. Tons of history… including videos Amazing reproductions of art ... including this sculpture credited as: Hopeinen suomenpystykorvaveistos 1979, Pekka Ketonen which most of us can't pronounce... but we can appreciate its artistry! And their special exhibition is on the Finnish Spitz focused on history, breeding and more. This is a wonderful resource to inform and entertain. Congratulations to our Founding Partner The Finnish Kennel Club. Amazing! The Finnish Canine Museum Online. Thank you! Any other kennel clubs – send us links to great work you are doing … please contact us!
  20. Kennel Clubs provide resources to help educate breeders. Here we feature links to our Partner's breeder education tools and seminars.
  21. Recognising the importance of managing the rate of inbreeding, the Kennel Club's Population analysis reports allow breeders to review the unique situation for each breed. If unchecked, inbreeding levels can rise in a breed, and although its effects may not initially be noticeable, this increase can have a significant impact on the health and welfare of future generations. - See more at: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/vets-researchers/publications-statistics-and-health-results/breed-population-analyses/#sthash.mmliOO10.dpuf Recognising the importance of managing the rate of inbreeding, the Kennel Club's Population analysis reports allow breeders to review the unique situation for each breed. If unchecked, inbreeding levels can rise in a breed, and although its effects may not initially be noticeable, this increase can have a significant impact on the health and welfare of future generations.
  22. Version 1.0.0

    186 downloads

    excerpts from the Preface and Executive Summary ------- "The Inquiry into dog breeding was headed by Professor Sir Patrick Bateson FRS. It was funded by Dogs Trust and the Kennel Club but was conducted independently of both organisations. The Inquiry received the advice of dog breeders as well as experts in genetics, animal welfare, and veterinary surgery and the report was anonymously peer reviewed by five experts in the three scientific fields. Throughout the Inquiry Professor Bateson was greatly assisted by Mrs Heather Peck." ------ "The structure of the report is as follows. After an introduction to the dog and its domestication, the second chapter discusses scientific advances in the assessment of animal welfare. The third chapter deals in general terms with the genetics of inbreeding. The fourth chapter summarises the response to my call for evidence and the fifth summarises what was learned from the interviews conducted over the summer. The sixth chapter deals with the central problem of poor welfare that has arisen in the course of breeding dogs and the seventh chapter discusses ways forward in order to improve matters. The eighth chapter gives my recommendations." ALSO SEE: Advisory Council Final Report -- Welfare Issues of Dog Breeding - 2014 http://dogwellnet.com/files/file/307-advisory-council-final-report-welfare-issues-of-dog-breeding-2014/
  23. Per Arvelius - Canine Behaviour & Genetics (external link access) Per Arvelius - Canine Behaviour and Genetics Meeting London 26-28 June 2015 Summary 1. Dog behaviour shows genetic variation and can therefore be improved by breeding 2. Modern techniques for estimating breeding values have a huge potential to increase genetic improvement of dog behaviour 3. Behavioural measurements should (usually) be objective and neutral, and summarized into composite traits Per Arvelius presentation from the Canine Genetics and Behavior Meeting - London - June 26-28-2015 Genetic Evaluation of Behaviour in Dogs (external link - access) Doctoral Thesis " A dog's behavioural characteristics are important for the dog, for the dog owner and for society as a whole. Behavioural traits can be changed by breeding, but to be effective when selecting breeding animals, good methods for measuring behaviour are essential. " "The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the prospects for improving dog behaviour by breeding. Dog breeders would potentially benefit substantially in terms of faster genetic progress for important behavioural traits, if modern methods for genetic evaluation were applied. For this to function well, it is essential to have good methods for measuring the traits of interest. In this thesis, a number of dog behavioural measurement methods were evaluated for their potential to be used for genetic evaluation, and with the purpose of advancing our understanding of factors affecting the usefulness of behavioural measurements for breeding purposes." Per Arvelius -- Genetic Evaluation of Behaviour in Dogs
  24. Are outcrossing programmes supported by the Kennel Club? Here we feature Kennel Club materials on outcrossing and cross breeding.
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