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Found 80 results

  1. Dystocia (difficulties in giving birth) frequently requires veterinary intervention. Breed-specific characteristics can impact breeding and whelping ability; dystocia occurs more commonly in some breeds of dogs than others. Elective caesareans are not uncommon; neither are emergency caesareans, especially amongst large-headed/narrow-pelvic breeds and many toy breeds. A May 2017 paper, Canine dystocia in 50 UK first-opinion emergency-care veterinary practices: prevalence and risk factors (http://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/181/4/88) published in the Veterinary Record provides evidence and insights. (See more information on this latest VetCompass research below as well as an overview of BVA, BSAVA, RCVS and The Kennel Club's initiatives to gather evidence-based information to be used in creating welfare-conscious breed health management strategies.)
  2. Transport of pets for adoption... AVMA provides guidance - reasons, responsibilities and considerations to ensure welfare. Transporting adoptable pets from areas where shelters and rescue facilities are overcrowded to locations where new homes await can be rewarding and save lives. However, transporting these animals requires careful planning and execution. "...risks and benefits for all animals affected by a transport program must be carefully considered. Careful planning minimizes risks and well-planned transport programs can be very successful."
  3. June 2017 - the Nordic Kennel Union website debuts! - site content is available in English - For more than 60 years, the Nordic Kennel Union has been the unified voice of the Nordic countries in the dog world. NKU members share a passion for animal welfare and dog health which is reflected in common strategies to secure future generations of healthy and sound dogs through responsible and sustainable breeding. Health is one of the most important aspects of dog breeding and a central area for Nordic cooperation. NOTE from IPFD CEO Brenda Bonnett: Congratulations - and thank you - to all the NKU members - and especially our IPFD Partners the kennel clubs of Sweden, Finland and Norway. Individually these clubs are amazing in terms of the scope of their efforts and their historical and ongoing commitment to the health and welfare of dogs. Their willingness to share with individual dog breeders and other clubs - through DogWellNet.com and other venues - makes them great role models and leaders in the dog world. Visit the Nordic Kennel Union Website!
  4. 4 downloads

    Dog Owners in the City Information about keeping a dog in urban areas from the Swedish Kennel Club ”Of course you can keep a dog if you live in a city. You just have to adapt to the situation and realise that you have a great responsibility to other people.” Also available from the SKK at... https://www.skk.se/globalassets/dokument/att-aga-hund/kampanjer/skall-inte-pa-hunden-2013/dog-owners-in-the-city_hi20.pdf
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    THIS IS AN OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE - YOU MAY READ THE ARTICLE AND DOWNLOAD THE PDF FROM THE PUBLISHER'S WEBSITE. A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds P. Sandøe, S. V. Kondrup1, P. C. Bennett, B. Forkman, I Meyer, H. F. Proschowsky,J. A. Serpell, T. B. Lund PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0172091 February 24, 2017 Breeds in this study include: Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, French Bulldog, Chihuahua and Cairn Terrier. Abstract "A number of dog breeds suffer from welfare problems due to extreme phenotypes and high levels of inherited diseases but the popularity of such breeds is not declining. Using a survey of owners of two popular breeds with extreme physical features (French Bulldog and Chihuahua), one with a high load of inherited diseases not directly related to conformation (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), and one representing the same size range but without extreme conformation and with the same level of disease as the overall dog population (Cairn Terrier), we investigated this seeming paradox. We examined planning and motivational factors behind acquisition of the dogs, and whether levels of experienced health and behavior problems were associated with the quality of the owner-dog relationship and the intention to reprocure a dog of the same breed. Owners of each of the four breeds (750/breed) were randomly drawn from a nationwide Danish dog registry and invited to participate. Of these, 911 responded, giving a final sample of 846. There were clear differences between owners of the four breeds with respect to degree of planning prior to purchase, with owners of Chihuahuas exhibiting less. Motivations behind choice of dog were also different. Health and other breed attributes were more important to owners of Cairn Terriers, whereas the dog's personality was reported to be more important for owners of French Bulldogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels but less important for Chihuahua owners. Higher levels of health and behavior problems were positively associated with a closer owner-dog relationship for owners of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Chihuahuas but, for owners of French Bulldogs, high levels of problems were negatively associated with an intention to procure the same breed again. In light of these findings, it appears less paradoxical that people continue to buy dogs with welfare problems." The "study aimed to answer the following questions: 1) Do motivations for acquiring a dog, and pre-purchase owner characteristics, differ between owners of the four breeds? 2) Do levels of expenditure on veterinary treatments and health and behavior problems experienced differ for owners of the four dog breeds? 3) Do motivations prior to acquisition, and owners' experiences of health and behavior problems with their dogs, explain differences in the quality of the owner-dog relationship between the four breeds? 4) Do intentions of acquiring the same breed the next time a dog is to be procured change as a function of experienced health and behavior problems?"
  6. Corneal ulcerative disease in dogs under primary veterinary care in England: epidemiology and clinical management Dan G. O’Neill, Monica M. Lee, Dave C. Brodbelt, David B. Church and Rick F. Sanchez https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575-017-0045-5 https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s40575-017-0045-5?site=cgejournal.biomedcentral.com
  7. IPFD Student Project 2016 'A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs' - Overview The first IPFD Student Project is underway and our student, Kelly Arthur, has developed articles, a blog, and interactive modules to share with the DogWellNet community. Kelly is a 3rd year veterinary student from Colorado State University and her project is generously supported by the Skippy Frank Fund. Below is an overview of the scope of Kelly’s completed project.
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    The Intersection of Welfare and Behaviour in Dogs and Relation to Health and Breeding Paula Boyden BVetMedMRCVS Dogs Trust
  9. Breeding dogs that exhibit symptoms identified as creating 'agony' is addressed by governments of some country's animal welfare laws. In Austria the legislators responsible for creating language in their country's Animal Welfare Act assume that characteristics required in the breed standards can lead to these 'agony' symptoms and now calls for organized cynology to take counter-measures. The Austrian Kennel Club ( Österreichische Kynologenverband - ÖKV ) initiated a project, "Konterqual" to address these concerns. All breeds have been under review for some years as the project has developed with the goal of identifying key areas of breed-specific health issues and pursuit of viable solutions to evaluate and improve breed's health. Here we present translated documentation on the processes by which the Austrian Kennel Club is addressing health and welfare issues in ÖKV registered purebred dogs. We at DWN commend the Austrian Kennel Club for their outstanding work for purebred dog health and welfare. Sharing work like this can help to inform other kennel clubs and countries dealing with similar issues. In addition to presenting the facts and outcomes, it is so helpful to be able to see the process, to follow what steps were taken. Personal experiences, what works, what doesn't ... all these help others. We look forward to further information from Austria on developments and outcomes of this program.
  10. "It is recognised that, as in society at large, there are different attitudes towards different animal uses amongst veterinary professionals. It will be necessary to build consensus based on effective consultation and democratic decision-making, utilising a shared working definition of animal welfare and widespread recognition of the veterinary profession as an animal welfare-focused profession. This strategy lays out these principles, developed through consultation."
  11. A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds P. Sandøe, S. V. Kondrup1, P. C. Bennett, B. Forkman, I Meyer, H. F. Proschowsky,J. A. Serpell, T. B. Lund This newly published peer-reviewed research is available in DWN Downloads. external link: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0172091.t001 "An array of previous studies thus indicates that both physical and behavioral attributes of dogs may have an impact on how attractive a specific breed or breed characteristic is perceived to be. However, as far as we are aware, no previous study has investigated the motivational patterns behind peoples' choices between dog breeds, or how these relate to the quality of the relationship between owners and dogs of specific breeds. To address this issue, we surveyed a representative sample of owners of four different breeds of dogs (two with extreme phenotypes, one with a high load of inherited diseases and one relatively healthy) with the overall goal of examining their motivations for acquiring their dog, the health and behavior problems encountered, and the quality of relationships between the dog owners and their dogs."
  12. See the learning Module at: http://aast.cfsph.iastate.edu/AWIC/index.htm Center for Food Security and Public Health © 2012–2016 Iowa State University
  13. Many thanks to the AKC-CHF and our other sponsors for supporting the collaborative Harmonization of Genetic Testing initiative!!! See the Dog News Annual Issue for the complete article.
  14. Robert Simons

    DogWellNet.com Digest

    Our latest edition of DogWellNet.com Digest. November 15, 2016 Check out the latest content on our site.
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    An international collaboration and event! The Rhodesian Ridgeback World Congress 2016 The Rhodesian Ridgeback World Congress was held in Sweden June 28 - June 30, 2016. We hope that those who were not able to attend the congress, can take part in the congress by reading the congress program. The Program (external link) http://www.nordicrrwc.org/images/files/RRWC-2016_Program.pdf Several speaker's Presentations have been uploaded to the http://www.nordicrrwc.org/ website as of November, 2016. -- See the Program presentations at http://www.nordicrrwc.org/rrwc-2016/program Event information is also available on the RRWC's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rrwc2016/ The Rhodesian Ridgeback World Congress 2016 speaker Presentations are available here on DWN as well (retained for record retention purposes). Also see the DWN's Rhodesian Ridgeback resources.
  16. September 2016 News from PAUL McGREEVY | Professor Faculty of Veterinary Science THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY IT to pups’ rescue!!! The University of Sydney recently launched a world-first app that will not only help owners help their dogs be happier and healthier, but could also play a life-saving role by teaching young dogs to behave better.
  17. Hello IPFD Community, My name is Kelly Arthur and I am a third-year veterinary student at Colorado State University (for more background see my introduction page). I’m very excited to announce my participation in IPFD through the newly created veterinary student projects. Projects are being initiated in various countries to educate students on the need for an international perspective and multidisciplinary approach to the issues facing pedigree dogs. Projects involve gathering, evaluating information, and creating educational resources for dog breeders and owners, veterinarians/veterinary students, as well as other stakeholders. My project is generously supported by the Skippy Frank Fund. My project specifically will focus on welfare and ethics of breeding dogs, with an emphasis on veterinarians and veterinary students. See an overview of my project, A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs, for an ongoing list of my work. When I first heard about this project, I could think of the following as important issues in ethics and welfare of breeding dogs, from a veterinary perspective: What are veterinarians doing to improve breeding genetics? Is selective breeding detrimental to decreasing diversity in certain breeds? Does breed specific regulation really help in protecting the public from dog bites? What is the influence of the breeding dog supply on the overall dog populations around the world? While it is easy to come up with quick opinions on these issues, the more I read, the more I realize that these issues are highly complex. For example: Veterinarians can play a role in breeding dog education, however there may be economic disincentives to decreasing the number of dogs born with inherited disease. Selective breeding has allowed us the great diversity that we have from dogs that serve in the military to assisting people with disabilities. Even if breed specific regulation can decrease dog bite incidents, the ability of people to prove the genetic makeup of their dog can be challenging legally. While some may say that only rescue is an appropriate way to get a dog because of pet overpopulation in some countries, there is still a great demand for purebred dogs. I hope others will join me on this journey. There will be opportunities for your participation and comments as we go. If this project interests you or you have a perspective you would like to share, I would love to hear from you. Please register at DogWellNet.com so you can follow not only my blog, but other resources I will be developing! I’m grateful for the opportunity to work with a collaborative group invested in the health and well-being of pedigree dogs. I hope it has overarching appeal both for veterinarians and breeders to encourage cooperation. Cheers, Kelly Photo source: http://www.wookiebooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Dog-Questioning.jpg
  18. How can veterinarians and veterinary students engage with animal welfare? Answers to this question were provided by Dr. Paul McGreevy, Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science at the University of Sydney, in an interview last week. Dr. McGreevy commented on the importance of veterinary involvement in animal welfare discussions stating, "we can lead the debate…we shouldn't just wash our hands of these ethical discussions…we are the informed guardians of animal welfare."
  19. IPFD welcomes 3rd year vet student, Kelly Arthur, our first Student Project associate, to share her exploration of A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs. And why not Check out Kelly's blog, too?
  20. There is much to ponder when considering breeding dog ethical questions including: There is always another perspective to hear and side to discuss related to welfare and ethics. Although there is a middle ground, those with the loudest voice and most extreme views appear to influence the breeding dog debate. Veterinarians seem to be under-represented in this public forum. Exploring options: One Welfare’s Brachycephalic Dog Scenario highlights some of the health challenges associated with breeding brachycephalic dogs. It portrays a situation that veterinarians in small animal practice face — advising a client on surgical correction of anatomic abnormalities of brachycephalic breeds — elongated soft palate, stenotic nares, a hypoplastic trachea, and everted laryngeal saccules.
  21. One Welfare is a collaborative effort of veterinary schools in Australia and New Zealand to engage the veterinary community in animal welfare discourse. Using a scenario-based teaching module, One Welfare introduces different ways of thinking about welfare and investigates how personal bias impacts these dialogues.
  22. Pedigree dog breeding in the UK: a major welfare concern? by Dr Nicola Rooney and Dr David Sargan with contributions from Dr Matthew Pead, Dr Carri Westgarth, Dr Emma Creighton and Dr Nick Branson.
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    by Dr Nicola Rooney and Dr David Sargan with contributions from Dr Matthew Pead, Dr Carri Westgarth, Dr Emma Creighton and Dr Nick Branson DESCRIPTION: Executive Summary of an independent report, which was commissioned by the RSPCA in order to help inform all those committed to protecting and improving the welfare of pedigree dogs. The Full Report is also available. Excerpt... "The situation is complex, with many stakeholders and numerous plausible courses of action. Each breed has its own array of problems and so there is no single solution. From research findings, past reports and discussions with prominent experts in the field, the authors compiled a list of 36 distinct actions which have all been posed as possible routes forward. Then based on a survey of twenty experts in the fi elds of dog welfare, genetics, veterinary science, and practising veterinarians, the authors derived fourteen actions believed to hold the greatest potential value for improving pedigree dog welfare."
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    excerpts from the Preface and Executive Summary ------- "The Inquiry into dog breeding was headed by Professor Sir Patrick Bateson FRS. It was funded by Dogs Trust and the Kennel Club but was conducted independently of both organisations. The Inquiry received the advice of dog breeders as well as experts in genetics, animal welfare, and veterinary surgery and the report was anonymously peer reviewed by five experts in the three scientific fields. Throughout the Inquiry Professor Bateson was greatly assisted by Mrs Heather Peck." ------ "The structure of the report is as follows. After an introduction to the dog and its domestication, the second chapter discusses scientific advances in the assessment of animal welfare. The third chapter deals in general terms with the genetics of inbreeding. The fourth chapter summarises the response to my call for evidence and the fifth summarises what was learned from the interviews conducted over the summer. The sixth chapter deals with the central problem of poor welfare that has arisen in the course of breeding dogs and the seventh chapter discusses ways forward in order to improve matters. The eighth chapter gives my recommendations." ALSO SEE: Advisory Council Final Report -- Welfare Issues of Dog Breeding - 2014 http://dogwellnet.com/files/file/307-advisory-council-final-report-welfare-issues-of-dog-breeding-2014/
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    This report covers work done by the THE ADVISORY COUNCIL ON THE WELFARE ISSUES OF DOG BREEDING (2010 - 2014). Work continues on the development of a shared strategy with all stakeholders of good will to dog welfare. The top priority is to ensure that the specific projects and reports of the Council are taken forward by the relevant bodies and that collaborative work continues.
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