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Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

  1. Researchers discover new features of a gene defect that affects the length of the muzzle and caudal vertebrae in dogs Date: February 23, 2021 Source: University of Helsinki Summary: A recent genetic study provides new information on the occurrence of a DVL2 gene defect associated with a screw tail and its relevance to canine constitution and health. The variant was found in several Bulldog and Pit Bull type breeds, and it was shown to result in caudal vertebral anomalies and shortening of the muzzle. The DLV2 variant may also affect the development of the h
  2. The Finnish Kennel Club (FKC) has finished the protocol and the instructions for fitness (walk) testing of breeding dogs in brachycephalic breeds. The test is similar to the one used by the Dutch Kennel Club. Finnish test instructions have been developed by veterinarians doing research on BOAS. Their results concerning the Bulldog have already been published. The researchers are still continuing their research and testing Pugs and French Bulldogs, whose results will be published later. According to the Finnish guidelines, a dog gets an approved walk test result if he/sh
  3. English bulldogs have been in the spotlight of authorities and media for a long time. The breed has a striking appearance and is often mentioned when health issues in pedigree dogs related to their appearance are discussed. With this background and as a starting point the Swedish Kennel Club in collaboration with the Swedish Club for English bulldogs have recently launched a new breeding strategy for the breed. The strategy presents hands on advice for breeders on how to make visible progress over the coming five year period by focusing on the main health issues associated with the breed.
  4. In This Issue: News & Highlights IPFD Annual Report 2020: A Year Like No Other Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  5. The Kennel Club has hosted a unique webcast to discuss brachycephalic health and what can be done collaboratively to ensure a healthier future for dogs. Chaired by Kennel Club Chairman, Tony Allcock OBE, the webcast panel comprised Dr Jane Ladlow, European and Royal College Specialist in Small Animal Surgery and leading BOAS researcher; Bill Lambert, Head of Health and Welfare at the Kennel Club; and Charlotte McNamara, Health and Welfare Development Manager at the Kennel Club. The panel discussed brachycephalic health, approaches across Europe, the need for a collaborative, evidence-based app
  6. The severity of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) is assessed by means of walk tests. With the help of walk tests, individuals with the most severe symptoms can be eliminated from breeding. See more on the FKC's walk test at: https://dogwellnet.com/blogs/entry/88-finnish-walk-test-for-brachycephalic-breeds-ready/ All the information on the Finnish walk test can be found here. (Internal): document.pdf "Walk test The walk test is meant for short-muzzled (brachycephalic) breeds that have symptoms caused by upper respiratory tract disorders. These
  7. Instagram loves flat-faced dogs. But they're facing a health crisis and no one can agree how to save them. We talk to a breeder, the RSPCA, the AVA and an owner whose dog has been in and out of surgery her whole life. A thought-provoking video that highlights the challenges of brachycephalic breeds - from educating breeders, to the veterinarians who are inevitably called upon to treat dogs bred for exaggerated characteristics.
  8. Love is Blind is a joint initiative of the RSPCA and the Australian Veterinary Association. Unfortunately, some breeds need more than unconditional love. Many breeds of dog have exaggerated physical features, which means they can’t breathe, walk or give birth normally. Many have chronic and painful ear, skin and eye problems. These problems prevent many dogs from having a normal and comfortable life. Five videos are available in the Playlist. Love Is Blind Love is Blind - Summer Series - Part One - Diego Love is Blind - Summer Series - Part Two - What is Brachyce
  9. "More information: https://www.vet.cam.ac.uk/boas/about-... The French bulldog, bulldog, pug, pekingese, shih tzu, Japanese chin, boxer and Boston terrier are all examples of brachycephalic breeds. The most distinctive feature of these breeds is their short muzzle. Brachycephalic dogs have been bred for centuries to possess a normal-sized lower jaw, and a disproportionately shorter upper jaw. In recent decades, breeding selection for extreme brachycephalic features has resulted in dogs that are predisposed to upper airway tract obstruction and subsequent respiratory distress, among severa
  10. Making Assessments of Dogs' Respiration has been produced by the Swedish Kennel Club as part of the work in improving health in pedigree dogs. The film illustrates the causes and background to dogs' respiratory problems and the difficulties to adjust the body temperature. The film discusses the signs of affected breathing that a judge may observe. (English subtitled) Making Assessments of Dogs' Respiration is a complement to the Breed-Specific Instructions for Judges, BSI. Also see: The Breed-Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges (BSI) The Swedish Kennel Club's Br
  11. Kyle Snowden, DVM, provides information on brachycephalic anatomy and discusses its impacts on breathing and thermo-regulation. Veterinary interventions used to correct problematic issues in compromised dogs are covered. Also see: DWN's International Actions: Extremes of Conformation Hot Topics, The Brachycephalic Issue
  12. IKFB: French Bulldog Club (Germany) - Walking test for French Bulldog, Pugs and English Bulldogs Also see: DWN's article on the IKFB - Dr. Anne Posthoff, the president of the German International Club for French Bulldogs, explains why the rules for breeding French Bulldogs in Germany are amongst the strictest in the world. Hot Topics - Brachycephalics, archive - DWN and Extremes of Conformation - Brachycephalics
  13. Link to a talk by Dr. Bonnett and to further resources... For additional comments and resources: See Brenda's Blog... Responsible Breeding and Sourcing of Dogs - Bonnett Swedish Vet Congress Oct 2020
  14. Finnish Investigation: Improving the implementation of animal welfare legislation in animal breeding Part II: Preliminary analysis of problems and means of intervention in the breeding of dogs Officially published in Finnish; unofficially translated to English. This investigation describe and attached here (see below) was summarized in Finnish report: An investigation would curb problems with dog breeding through monitoring criteria and ethical delegation. (That link contains a translation of the Summary written by the Finnish Food Authority as well as link to Kirsi Saino's Com
  15. Reframing Current Challenges Around Pedigree Dogs A Call for Respectful Dialogue, Collaboration, and Collective Actions For all those who want a sustainable future for healthy pedigree dogs. Author: Brenda N. Bonnett, DVM, PhD, CEO, International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) Note: This article is available in Nederlands, English, Suomeksi, Français, Deutsch, and Español (download below).
  16. Facial morphology of brachycephalic breeds: evolution since the end of the XIXth century and current perspectives Authors, Claude Guintard1 and Hélène Denis2 offer insights into today's increasing attention on brachycephalic conformation related to health 'issues'. The short article "aims, from archival images, to try to objectify the changes in cephalic profile that may have occurred in the main brachycephalic breeds since the late 19th century." A focus on selection and development of the Bulldog, Dogue de Bordeaux and Pug breeds from the 1800's through today is illuminating in terms of
  17. Get a GRIHP! on French Bulldogs This article on French Bulldogs is part of a series to highlight the Big Picture of health, welfare and breeding. Concerns for the welfare of brachycephalic breeds, including the French Bulldog, have been the subject of much debate over the past several years. The popularity of French Bulldogs is undeniable; demand for this breed has soared over the past decade. Supply and demand has led to production of pups by less than scrupulous breeders who are not operating under the umbrella or direction of KCs and Breed club health improvement program recomme
  18. In This Issue: News & Highlights Actions Around Brachycephalic Dogs: Reports, Research, and Legislative Developments in Several Countries Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  19. Come for the looks, stay for the personality? A mixed methods investigation of reacquisition and owner recommendation of Bulldogs, French Bulldogs, and Pugs ...is the latest analysis of data collected and reported on in a 2019 study - see - Great expectations, inconvenient truths, and the paradoxes of the dog-owner relationship for owners of brachycephalic dogs. As we said in that blog: "Popularity of brachycephalic (flat-faced) dog breeds is increasing internationally despite well-documented intrinsic health and welfare problems associated with their conformation." The previous study lo
  20. Finnish report: An investigation would curb problems with dog breeding through monitoring criteria and ethical delegation As we have been reporting, there is a surge of regulatory efforts to address concerns about the health and welfare of pedigreed dogs, especially brachycephalic breeds, in several countries. The potential impact on not only dog breeders and pedigreed dog organizations, but also on dog owners and even veterinarians may be considerable, as well as on many stakeholders in the pet industry. It is apparent that some of these efforts are proceeding unilaterally rather than c
  21. The severity of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) is assessed by means of walk tests. With the help of walk tests, individuals with the most severe symptoms can be eliminated from breeding.
  22. In Windsor (UK) in June 2019, the IPFD 4th International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW) took place (Pegram et al., 2020) a key recommendation was to initiate a multi-stakeholder International working group on extreme conformation, with an initial focus on brachycephalics . Premise: The International Working Group on Extreme Conformation in Dogs (IWGECD) will be a platform in which national and international working groups, experts and stakeholders join forces to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of all dogs by limiting the negative welfare impacts from extreme conformations in
  23. Ian Seath has again stimulated our 'little grey cells' and maybe even touched on some emotions, attitudes, and even deep-seated beliefs in his DOG-ED: SOCIAL ENTERPRISE post (23 June 2020): CULTURE EATS STRATEGY FOR BREAKFAST! Catchy title - firstly - where does that come from, and what does it mean? "Management Guru Peter Drucker famously stated that culture eats strategy for breakfast. So, What does "culture eats strategy" mean for you and your organization? In a very practical sense: No matter what business strateg
  24. This article is a summary we (IPFD) have created describing the issues, the dialogue and challenges around regulatory actions in the Netherlands as of June 2020. The issue is having a polarizing effect across stakeholder groups, and it is our belief that the best results for all dogs are to be achieved by collaborative efforts. IPFD also promotes the considerations of impacts on dogs, breeds, and people when programs are put in place, given the complex nature of issues of health and welfare. This article is a compilation of resources for those who are exploring the situation.
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