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Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 65 results

  1. Following on from my blog on the Seminar for the FBDCA we are thrilled to find that the French Bulldog Club of England has shared their Breed Health and Conservation Plan (BHCP). Link here; PDF attached, below. These plans are being assembled by the health team at The Kennel Club, until recently spearheaded by Katy Evans (now the Jane H. Booker Chair in Canine Genetics at The Seeing Eye in the USA). Similar to coverage in my talk (video link here), the focus is very broad in the BHCP and makes clear the challenges ahead for this breed, internationally. The BHCP incorporates statistics from Sweden and Britain, from our IPFD Partners Agria Pet Insurance/Agria Djurförsäkring and VetCompass. Work like the BHCPs in the UK, Breed-specific Breeding Strategies from Sweden (RAS) and Finland (JTO) and others will be incorporated into our new development, the IPFD Health Strategy Database for Dogs (HSDD) coming soon. Then we will be able to provide an interactive resource where 'all' health information can be accessed to inform the great efforts being made by groups throughout the world. Congrats and thanks to The KC and the French Bulldog Club of England. breed_health_and_conservation_plan_-_french_bulldog_final__1_.pdf
  2. Dave St. Louis

    Saluki

    Salukis vary in type and the variation is desired and typical for the breed. The reason for the variation is the special place held by the Saluki in the Arab tradition and the immense size of the Middle East area where the Saluki has been used as a hound of the chase for thousands of years.
  3. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is a short summary of RAS – Breeding strategies of the breed ‐ Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. The RAS is a document covering the breed and the breeding strategies for the future of a healthy and sound Toller. The full document is for now only in Swedish. The RAS has a yearly follow‐up, and is readjusted every 5th year, and is now in a working process (2019). -VERSION 2014‐
  4. Breed-Specific Health Strategies by breed, nationally and internationally.
  5. News & Highlights Expertise, inspiration and insight... Breed education at its finest! Helpful Hint Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  6. Brenda Bonnett

    "We do this for the dogs' sake"

    I have frequently heard people say that what they are doing is 'for the dogs'' when it might seem it is mainly for their own goals.- but the Swedish Kennel Club has posted an informative video about the Breed Specific Instructions that makes it clear that the only goal with this program is to promote the health and welfare of dogs. Renowned judges explain why they think their role in promoting health and welfare is so important. We have lots of information on the BSI and the Swedish Breed-Specific Breeding Strategies, in general (as well as, lists of breeds with breed specific strategies from several countries on DogWellNet.com and this video really puts it all in perspective. We all know that health and welfare of dogs is the responsibility of all stakeholders in the dog world and judges are no exception. The impact of dog shows and the awarding of wins to specific dogs has a big impact on the public perception of pedigree dogs, in general, and also of specific breeds. It is crucial that dogs that achieve success in these increasingly 'prime time', public displays epitomize the best of the best - not just in looks, but also in health. All organizations licensing dog judges insist on 'judges education' but the BSI program takes it a step further, insisting that judges take responsibility in only promoting dogs without physical manifestations of conditions/ conformations that may limit health and welfare. The BSI process is followed in all Scandinavian countries, as well as several other European countries. A key part of the BSI process is the completion of reports by the judges (discussed in the video); and here is a link to an example of a report required for German Shepherd Dogs by Rad van Beheer in The Netherlands. The Canadian Kennel Club instituted an observer program in 2017, but I haven't found full details on the goals of the program. The AKC has a Field Rep program and, although at the moment I do not think these North American programs have breed-specific requirements similar to the BSI, clearly there are structures in place that could facilitate such an approach. A striking comment in the video was that judges must be on the lookout for negative trends and help ensure that these do not progress. I am not a judge; I briefly showed dogs in the distant past; and I am often concerned by what I see at show events. I was recently at the National Specialty of the French Bulldog Club of America in Louisville, KY, USA, at the end of October 2018. It was an honor to talk to the club members who are concerned about health issues in this breed. However, I was confused by seeing many dogs being shown that clearly had no actual tails (maybe 2 coccyx vertebrae), clearly so in the eyes of this veterinarian, and described as such by the competitors as a recent trend. And yet, I was repeatedly assured that 'the standard specifies that a French Bulldog must have a tail'. Such a contradiction, such an extreme, would presumably not be allowed, under the BSI, especially when this is not a cosmetic change, but a structural one. It is particularly concerning given that we know that French Bulldogs have an increased risk for spinal abnormalities and a new paper suggests that selection for screw tails may have led to a syndrome of abnormalities in both English and French Bulldogs. Every one who has bred dogs knows that focus on one characteristic, especially going for extremes, can lead to occurrence of unforeseen consequences. Nothing happens in isolation with breeding and selection. Congrats to the Swedes for this video and I hope it will encourage more judges to take an approach like this - regardless of whether or not they are under a requirement to do so. Because our activities really should be 'for the dogs' sake'.
  7. The 3rd International Dog Health Workshop held in Paris in April of 2017 included 140 participants from 23 countries and was structured around six important issues facing those who work to improve dog health. The themes covered in Paris included individualized breed-specific strategies for health and breeding, extreme conformations, education and communication in relation to antimicrobial resistance, behavior and welfare, genetic testing and population-based evidence. A number of exciting actions were agreed during the meeting. A working group was formed to create tools to help breed clubs accelerate the implementation of breed-health strategies. Here we will present work products created by the the Breeding Strategies working group. The content of the Breed-specific Breeding Strategies - 2017 IDHW follow-up - Version 5 - September 2018.pptx is based on inputs from: Brenda Bonnett Katy Evans Gregoire Leroy Helena Skarp Ian Seath PDF version: Breed-specific Breeding Strategies - 2017 IDHW follow-up - Version 5 - September 2018 - PDF Please note: The content presented in the attached PPTX/PDF presentation and excerpts found in the body of this article represent a work in progress.
  8. Breeding healthy dogs Professor Brenda Bonnett talks about the use of breed specific insurance statistics for breeders, breed clubs, veterinarians and other stake holders. Avl av friske hunder Professor Brenda Bonnett's foredrag om bruken av rasespesifikk forsikringsstatistikk i avlsarbeidet. Foredraget henvender seg til oppdrettere, raseklubber, veterinærer og andre interessenter. Also see: Breeds with summaries of Swedish KC, Finnish KC or Norwegian KC Breeding Strategies (RAS|JTO) Swedish insurance data
  9. Version 1.0.0

    46 downloads

    INTRODUCTION The Kennel Club launched a dynamic new resource for breed clubs and individual breeders – the Breed Health and Conservation Plans (BHCP) project – in September 2016. The purpose of the project is to ensure that all health concerns for a breed are identified through evidence-based criteria, and that breeders are provided with useful information and resources to support them in making balanced breeding decisions that make health a priority. The Breed Health and Conservation Plans take a holistic view of breed health with consideration to the following issues: known inherited conditions, complex conditions (i.e. those involving many genes and environmental effects such as nutrition or exercise levels, for example hip dysplasia), conformational concerns and population genetics. Sources of evidence and data have been collated into an evidence base (Section 1 of the BHCP) which gives clear indications of the most significant health conditions in each breed, in terms of prevalence and impact. Once the evidence base document has been produced it is discussed with the relevant Breed Health Coordinator and breed health committee or representatives if applicable. Priorities are agreed and laid out in Section 2. A collaborative action plan for the health of the breed is then agreed and incorporated as Section 3 of the BHCP. This will be monitored and reviewed.
  10. Table of Contents: News & Highlights Viewing DogWellNet.com in Other Languages Helpful Hint Stay Informed!
  11. Barbara Thiel graciously provided DWN's community with a book review - a great read for breed managers and breeders. "Managing Breeds for a Secure Future: Strategies for Breeders and Breed Associations" by D. Phillip Sponenberg, Jeannette Beranger and Alison Martin Originally published in 2007, Second Edition 2017
  12. News & Highlights Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Resource Goes Live! Stay Informed!
  13. Dave St. Louis

    Breed Health Committees

    This is not a comprehensive listing - it is a starting point for finding relevant resources. Please visit the various areas of the site using the purple navigation bar and/or the Search function. Breed Club Health Committee resources on DogWellNet.com Who are we and where does the information come from? Our DogWellNet community includes members and breed experts who are active participants in Breed Club Health Committees. Our broad network of Partners and supporters includes cynological organizations (e.g., kennel clubs), health registries, research and veterinary organisations, non-profits, corporations and other stakeholders in dog health. IPFD's Partner Kennel Clubs and affiliated Breed Clubs have worked hard to provide DWN with some great translations of health related information as well as references, articles and links to helpful and effective materials they have developed to enhance the health and welfare in our world's cherished breeds. Many hands make for lighter work; and through sharing important information on breed-specific health concerns and methods to address their management we can all have a clearer understanding of core issues that impact purebred dogs and ways in which, together, we can be a force to improve the lives of dogs and their people. How do you get the most out of DogWellNet.com? At DWN we'd like to see a better life for all dogs everywhere ... please let us know if your Breed Club's Health Committee would like to share your work with like-minded breed enthusiasts committed to improving dog's health and well-being. Visiting us as a guest? Sign Up to participate and get access to all available content and materials specifically for Health Committees on DogWellNet. See ways to participate in DWN! And do let us know what you are looking for; our site has many assets, and we'll be happy to help you locate content of interest to you. DWN Members can make comments on articles, or can contact our staff directly or through info@ipfdogs.com if they have something to share.
  14. National Kennel Clubs are major stakeholders in the governance and regulation of dog breeding. As such, they have been the targets of major criticism related to dog health issues. It is therefore interesting to investigate to what extent health and welfare is a priority for kennel clubs (KCs), and what are the capacities and actions implemented to deal with those issues. A survey was sent in 2017 to 40 KCs with 15 answers received from 11 European (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the UK) and 4 non-European countries (Australia, Mexico, Uruguay, and the USA) aimed at describing and comparing information across countries in dog breed health management (Wang et al. 2018). First, in order to determine the population of dogs under the responsibility of KC, the percentages of all dogs being registered as ‘pedigree’ dogs were estimated considering the 15 surveyed KCs, as well 35 other countries, using sources such as the FCI online statistics. Across countries, the average and median percentage of the entire dog population that were registered pedigree dogs, respectively was 20% and 14%. However, there was a large variation across countries, with European Nordic countries showing, in general, a larger proportion of pedigree dogs (see Figure 1). This aspect is of importance, since it is expected that the responsibility toward general dog health, as well as the capacity to improve the situation, relates to the proportion of dogs that are at least to some extent under the influence of the KCs. When asked about the current challenges, KCs ranked exaggerated morphological features and inherited disorders as the most important issues, showing those two problems are now clearly identified as priorities (Figure 2). By contrast, issues such as economic constraints to breeding were rarely viewed as problematic for dog breeding. Kennel clubs also commented on challenges related to the difficulty to find balance between increased regulation and the risk of losing members; to achieve consensus and compliance of breeders and clubs toward breed health strategies; as well as lack of capacity regarding information provision and education. Surveyed countries showed great diversity in terms of information management, implementation of breeding strategies, recommendations, requirement, restriction and tools. Most KCs indicated that information on genealogies, breed standards and dog shows were recorded in their data base for most, if not all breeds; however, health information (e.g. screening examinations, genetic tests) was more sparsely recorded and provided to the public, both for breeds within countries and across countries (Figure 3). For instance, KCs from Austria, Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, the UK and the USA provided health information status on pedigrees and in online data bases, but in general, not all breeds were covered. When considering implementation of breeding strategies, six countries indicated that there were no breeding strategies implemented by any breed clubs, while in three countries (Austria, Sweden and the Netherlands) it was reported that each breed club had its breeding strategy. Several countries indicated that they were planning to develop breeding tools and provide health information to users, and for instance, France and Belgium reported having ongoing work to develop tools to provide online pedigree with health information or estimate breeding values for complex disorders such as hip dysplasia. Although limited by the relatively low number of countries considered, this survey showed that despite large differences in their approach to breeding policies and management, the awareness to improve breeding and health of pedigree dogs was strong among the surveyed Kennel Clubs. The dog breeding world is increasingly global in scope. The understanding of both the diversity of health initiatives and the potential for coordinated actions internationally is key to further efforts to promote dog health and welfare. There is probably still a lot of progress to be made in term of information provision and collection, as well as planning breeding strategies considering dog health. In particular, finding a consensus in terms of constraints and priorities for breeding, is expected to be particularly challenging for Kennel Clubs and breed clubs in order to implement those strategies. Although the situations differ across countries, exchanges of experiences may surely help to find the most adequate solutions toward improvement of health and welfare. Reference: Wang, S., Laloë, D., Missant, F. M., Malm, S., Lewis, T., Verrier, E., ... & Leroy, G. (2018). Breeding policies and management of pedigree dogs in 15 national kennel clubs. The Veterinary Journal. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2018.02.018
  15. Breed Health Strategies - DWN Resources Here you will find links to: RAS (Swedish) and JTO (Finnish) breeding strategy documents in English (summaries) for multiple breeds International Dog Health Workshop Plenary Talks on Breed Health Strategies DogWellNet breed-specific strategy articles Country/Kennel Club Programs and Resources Blog articles on breeding strategies
  16. Many national kennel clubs, other cynological organizations (e.g. breed clubs) have developed guidelines, approaches or programs to: describe and evaluate the health of specific breeds outline guidelines or regulations for screening tests or other assessments on potential breeding dogs raise awareness about issues in a given breed. These programs take different forms in different countries. In this section we will provide information on various approaches and programs and direct you to online resources. For general guidelines (not breed-specific) see also: country-specific General Breeding and Ethical Guidelines. Countries: Austria: Austrian Kennel Club - Response to Animal Welfare Legislation The Austrian Kennel Club ( Österreichische Kynologenverband - ÖKV ) initiated a project, "Konterqual", to address legislative concerns. Sharing work like this can help to inform other kennel clubs and countries dealing with similar issues. In addition to presenting the facts and outcomes, it is so helpful to be able to see the process, to follow what steps were taken. Personal experiences, what works, what doesn't ... all these help others. We look forward to further information from Austria on developments and outcomes of this program. Nordic Kennel Union: The Nordic Kennel Union is a cooperative organisation for the Kennel Clubs of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Below we list efforts made to address exaggerations in breeds through the NKU country's BSI. There are six basic criteria defining if a breed should be listed as a high profile breed. Breeds which fulfill these and are thus listed are particularly paid attention to at dog show judging by the judge. Sweden: Svenska Kennelklubben (The Swedish Kennel Club) Breed-Specific Breeding Strategy Program For Judges see: Breed Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. Breed Specific Strategies BSI - Presentation DHW, Dortmund Germany - Göran Bodegård SKK "The BSI program has been routinely applied in Sweden from 2009 – and at present generated more than ten thousand reports. From 2012 the program is embraced and worked through by all the Nordic countries and the latest edition ( NKU BSI 2014) is founded on the compound experience in the Nordic countries regarding the identification of areas of risk in a selected number of high profile breeds during the last decade. The structure of the NKU BSI is thus actually an inventory which allows for a continuous follow up and dynamic revisions of the BSI." SKK Genetic Programmes "Genetic health programmes are one of the tools used by the SKK (the Swedish Kennel Club) to manage hereditary disease. The SKK implemented the use of screening programmes to improve health in Swedish dogs more than 30 years ago. The first programmes concerned hip dysplasia and hereditary eye diseases. More recently, programmes for other heritable conditions, such as elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation and heart disease have been developed. Health programmes are based on breed-specific needs and have been introduced on request from and in consultation with the breed clubs." Finland: Breed Specific Instructions (BSI): Finland 2015 The Finnish Kennel Club has published new Breed-Specific Instructions for dog show judges. The instructions were drafted with the purpose of steering dog show judges to pay closer attention to exaggerated breed types. The new instructions entered into force on 1 June 2015. The Finnish Kennel Club's breeding strategy applies to all breeds. It outlines the main principles and objectives in breeding, and aims to improve genetic health of dogs. Find out what the breeding strategy means in your breed Finnish Kennel Club: General Breeding Strategy The UK: The Kennel Club What the Kennel Club does for Dog Health The report encompasses much of the work undertaken in recent years and includes detailed sections on: How The Kennel Club promotes health through education Initiatives designed to improve health awareness in dog shows How The Kennel Club promotes and progresses scientific research How The Kennel Club encourages responsible breeding of healthy dogs. Breed Watch The info graphic below provides information. Also see: High Profile Breeds Veterinary Health Checks for Best of Breed winners. BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS September 2016 News -- What is the new project at The Kennel Club? Breed Health & Conservation Plan -- The Kennel Club To learn more about the Breed Health and Conservation Project see... BHCP PDF.pdf Kennel Club Launching Breed Health And Conservation Plans The Kennel Club is launching its Breed Health and Conservation Plans project, a dynamic new resource to support breed clubs and individual breeders. This exciting new project will use evidence-based criteria to help identify common breed specific health concerns. Breeders will be provided with information and breeding resources to help them improve the health of their puppies and breed. We at DWN look forward to learning more about the good work done by Dr. Katy Evans and Bonnie Wiles and the UK Breed Clubs! "Breed Health Co-ordinators are individuals working on behalf of breed clubs and councils who are advocates for the health and welfare of their chosen breed." If you have a health related questions concerning a particular breed, we recommend contacting the Breed Health Co-ordinator through the your local Breed club, a list of which is available via the "Find a dog club" link on the Kennel Club's Breed Information Centre. TOOLKITS FOR BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS Website Content Toolkit Website Enhancement Toolkit BREED HEALTH IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
  17. Ann Milligan

    The Evolution of Petface

    The Evolution of Petface The same traits that make these dogs adorable threaten their health and well-being https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/evolution-petface-180967987/ By Kat Eschner smithsonian.com January 31, 2018 8:30AM
  18. Author: Dr Frédéric MAISON Membre du Comité de la SCC Président de la Commission d'élevage de la SCC
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