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Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 58 results

  1. News & Highlights Expertise, inspiration and insight... Breed education at its finest! Helpful Hint Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  2. As we have seen, veterinarians and their organizations have been engaging significantly in aspects of health in breeds and healthy breeding. Here is a recent position paper, The Role of Health Conscious Breeding and Genetic Testing in Reducing the Impact of Hereditary Disease, from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA). The Hereditary Disease Committee of the WSAVA is an IPFD Collaborator.
  3. Breeding healthy dogs Professor Brenda Bonnett talks about the use of breed specific insurance statistics for breeders, breed clubs, veterinarians and other stake holders. Avl av friske hunder Professor Brenda Bonnett's foredrag om bruken av rasespesifikk forsikringsstatistikk i avlsarbeidet. Foredraget henvender seg til oppdrettere, raseklubber, veterinærer og andre interessenter. Also see: Breeds with summaries of Swedish KC, Finnish KC or Norwegian KC Breeding Strategies (RAS|JTO) Swedish insurance data
  4. Table of Contents: News & Highlights IPFD Contributors' YouTube Resources Helpful Hint Stay Informed!
  5. Version 1.0.0

    38 downloads

    INTRODUCTION The Kennel Club launched a dynamic new resource for breed clubs and individual breeders – the Breed Health and Conservation Plans (BHCP) project – in September 2016. The purpose of the project is to ensure that all health concerns for a breed are identified through evidence-based criteria, and that breeders are provided with useful information and resources to support them in making balanced breeding decisions that make health a priority. The Breed Health and Conservation Plans take a holistic view of breed health with consideration to the following issues: known inherited conditions, complex conditions (i.e. those involving many genes and environmental effects such as nutrition or exercise levels, for example hip dysplasia), conformational concerns and population genetics. Sources of evidence and data have been collated into an evidence base (Section 1 of the BHCP) which gives clear indications of the most significant health conditions in each breed, in terms of prevalence and impact. Once the evidence base document has been produced it is discussed with the relevant Breed Health Coordinator and breed health committee or representatives if applicable. Priorities are agreed and laid out in Section 2. A collaborative action plan for the health of the breed is then agreed and incorporated as Section 3 of the BHCP. This will be monitored and reviewed.
  6. Starting this project made me ponder: There always seems to be another perspective related to welfare and ethics that I had not thought of before. There appear to be two camps online—those for breeding and those against (and there is little in between). Veterinarians seem to be under-represented in the breeding dog public debate. This provides further validation for an aspect of my project – to create educational resources for veterinarians/veterinary students. In seeking resources, I came across One Welfare (see link below), a collaborative effort of veterinary schools in Australia and New Zealand to engage the veterinary community in animal welfare discourse. It highlights some of the questions I have been pondering related to the complexities surrounding dog breeding. Dogs have great species differences in size, color, and temperament and people can choose from registered purebred dogs to homeless dogs, and everything in between. One Welfare resources can be used to inform questions related to the adorable internet video posted below. Hazel is a purebred rescue. No one can deny that she is cute, well-deserving of a good home, and born with a genetic condition that leaves her challenged. Difficult questions still remain: Is the breeding pair that produced Hazel still breeding? What genetic defects are in their lines? How could they be prevented or detected? Are we glorifying “disabled animals” because they are cute and not thinking critically about breeding practices? Hazel has a happy ending, what is the outcome for other disabled dogs? The goals of One Welfare and IPFD are similar—to engage in conversations that inform, raise awareness, and improve animal welfare. Check out all the resources on their page and look at articles we will be posting on IPFD for more details - for example: An Interactive Scenario from One Welfare to Illuminate Brachycephalic Welfare Challenges. I hope my veterinary project generates greater understanding between veterinarians and breeders, so we can come together to improve the welfare of individual animals, understand the needs of breeders, and improve future generations of dogs.
  7. On July 14th, 2016, I had the privilege of speaking with Dr. Paul McGreevy, BVSc, PhD, University of Sydney professor, researcher, veterinary specialist in behavioral medicine and expert in companion animal welfare. The complex issues affecting the welfare and behavior of purebred dogs is one area in which Dr. McGreevy focuses his research. Below are some of the topics that we discussed and an example is provided to illustrate each point. 1. The benefits of health practices differ among species. So, in one setting a health practice may be acceptable as the standard of care and in another banned. The procedure of tail docking illustrates this point well. In the book, Dilemmas in Animal Welfare, the authors discuss tail docking in general and state, "as the acute pain can be controlled…and the absence of a tail has seldom been shown to disadvantage the animals greatly, a utilitarian analysis focusing on direct effects might conclude tail docking to be an acceptable procedure where demonstrable and significant benefits are obtained." (p. 21) The modern pork operation docks tails to protect the pigs from cannibalism, a behavior that occurs in intensive rearing systems. In this case, the acute pain of tail docking benefits the herd as a whole by reducing biting injuries and infection. Of course, there is growing evidence that tail-biting can be reduced with environmental enrichment and optimal management, so the surgical approach in pig production may eventually come to an end. The American Veterinary Medical Association opposes tail docking in dogs performed for cosmetic purposes. Canine tail docking in the UK has been banned since 2006, with certain exceptions for working dogs, and additional restrictions relative to dog shows. However, the situation is not consistent across countries and in the UK further changes are being sought by The Kennel Club. More information on tail docking in the UK can be found on the British Veterinary Association's Policy position: tail docking of dogs. In the end, tail docking may be appropriate for certain species in specific situations while not appropriate in others. Overall, the inconsistencies in species' welfare-related recommendations may call into question the profession's integrity, as mentioned in the article "How might veterinarians do more for animal welfare?" 2. Studying animal welfare is challenging because it is at the intersection of the sciences and social sciences. As animal welfare scientists, it is our charge to focus on animal well-being and health, while at the same time adopting optimal practices that are feasible within the constraints of the management system. Most standardized approaches to animal welfare focus on the animal specifically, but not necessarily how obtainable the goals are for veterinarians, breeders, and producers. For example, The Five Freedoms, originally written in 1965, emphasize "avoidance of unnecessary suffering and the provision of needs", including protecting animals from disease/pain, thirst/hunger, discomfort, fear, and allowing them to express natural behaviors. Although never intended to provide a checklist or to be equally weighted, they have attracted some criticism for being too ambitious or simplistic. David Fraser's adapted model of animal welfare focuses on the intersection of an animal's health, affective states, and natural living. While both of the above models have been influential in the development of animal welfare science, their implementation is challenged by other factors — such as productivity and profitability, the animal caretaker's well being, and management feasibility. By adopting a more integrative approach, we can develop ways to improve animal welfare — making it more accessible to the public, veterinarians, breeders, and producers and at the same time enhancing business outcomes. 3. Veterinarians can improve the welfare of breeding dogs. A case example is the critical role veterinarians play when performing cesarean sections on dog breeds that cannot deliver naturally. For these breeds, their biological fitness is reliant on a veterinarian's ability to surgically deliver the puppies. This highlights the need for continued work between breeders and veterinarians because, in the case of cesareans, the fate of the breed is dependent on us. Our training allows us to help the individual dog but are we perpetuating genetic problems? One article used breed club data to determine the "Proportion of litters of purebred dogs born by caesarean section". For the Boston terrier, Bulldog, and French bulldog, the rates of cesarean section were greater than 80%. Cesarean sections give veterinarians the opportunity to work directly with breeder clients, but in doing so are we providing adequate breeding advice in the form of genetic counselling? Do veterinarians receive proper training to educate clients? Are we even involved in these discussions with clients? 4. There can be unintended consequences in advancing animal welfare. An article on the challenges associated with pedigree dog health, explains that although the incidence of inherited disease can be decreased through the use of genetic tests and screening, if fewer animals are then in the breeding population, this can lead to the unintended consequence of reduced genetic diversity. Reducing the breeding pool, could result in the inadvertent outcome of enhancing inherited disease. It raises the probable need for outcrossing to other breeds. In addition, some breeds may not have enough genetic diversity in their population to correct some of the challenges with inherited disease. This is described in "A genetic assessment of the English bulldog". The study cites the small founder population and artificial bottleneck as causes for the lack of diversity. Additionally, selection for certain traits can have unintended consequences. One study describes the causative mutation for short-tailed dogs as heterozygous in a variety of breeds. The genetic basis of bobtails is of interest to breeders because of the perceived need for tail docking in certain breeds. However, this defect was shown in the study to decrease litter size, likely due to early embryonic death of homozygous animals. As a result of this conversation, I saw additional angles to the breeding dog debate and Dr. McGreevy provided insightful challenges related to purebred dogs that sparked my interest about further perspectives on animal welfare. By looking at these, and other animal welfare-related complexities from multiple angles, veterinarians can be more proactive in leading animal welfare discussions. Reference: Appleby, M.C., Weary, D.M., Sandoe, P. (2014). Dilemmas in Animal Welfare. Oxfordshire, UK: CAB International. For more information about Dr. McGreevy's educational platform developed for veterinary students, see: One Welfare Brachycephalic Dog Scenario Overview article on the One Welfare Platform Additionally, see the article published on welfare educational opportunities in the U.S. for additional ideas on how to get more involved in thinking about animal welfare. Photo source: http://www.hillspet.com/HillsPetUS/v1/portal/en/us/locale/img/about_us/HP_about_animalwelfare_section1_md.jpg
  8. People often are enamored and proud of the close relationship they share with their pet. The video below features interviews with pet owners and shows the close bond humans have with various animals. However, pet ownership comes with responsibility and people should thoughtfully consider their options before getting a pet. B4UGETAPET, created by the University of Guelph, encourages people to do research before acquiring a cat or dog to find a best fit. Initial questions important for people to consider if they are thinking about acquiring a new pet are below. 1. What kind of pet is best for your family? 2. If a dog, what kind? 3. Why that kind of dog? 4. What is the best source for that kind of dog? During this project I have been amazed at the breadth of resources available to help people find the best dog for their lifestyle. The goal of this post is to organize these resources so veterinarians, veterinary students, and breeders have additional tools to advise people looking for a new dog. Promoting informed decision-making regarding acquisition of a dog may lead to better matching, retained ownership, and a closer human-dog bond. In addition to B4UGETAPET, there are numerous other resources to assist with dog acquisition. While they start with a general introduction, most resources have a slant towards re-homed dogs or breed-specific acquisition. The RSPCA’s Smart Puppy and Dog Buyer’s Guide helps you to be prepared, introduces different types of dogs, describes where to get your dog, and includes caring for your dog post acquisition. This source advises adopting from a local shelter and if you can’t find a dog there, breeders may be acceptable if they are not puppy farms. Similar is Finding Fido, a program by the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies. It includes inspiring stories of dog rescue, multiple pages on caring for a fido, choosing a puppy or adult, etc. The site strongly opposes puppy mills but provides some resources for finding a reputable breeder, such as Essential questions to ask a breeder. Other programs, such as ASPCA’s Meet Your Match, provides resources for shelters and rescue organizations so they can better match adoptable dogs and families in the hopes of decreasing return rates. Many other resources focus on matching a dog’s breed to an owner’s lifestyle. The American Kennel Club’s Find a Match program asks progressive questions about housing type, children, other animals in the house, and activity level of prospective owner. It then suggests breeds that match the answers provided. The Kennel Club (UK) also has a Puppy Buying Guide App that can help you select a dog including choosing a breed, what to ask a breeder, links to local breed clubs, etc. Purina’s Dog Breed Selector has fill-in-the blank questions to figure out what breed is best for a prospective owner. There are also interactive materials for people to use post-acquisition of a dog to maintain quality care. One example, is the Dog Log Book, an app that tracks your dog’s behavior and and suggests ways to better meet you dog’s needs. All of these resources seem to have the same goal in mind—improving the fit between dogs and their owners. However, in spite of these resources it seems that owner-dog mismatch is still an important contributing cause of relinquishment of dogs to shelters. As written in “Characteristics of Shelter-Relinquished Animals” some factors might include: Physical and behavioral characteristics of the animal Characteristics, knowledge, experience, and expectations of the owner Extenuating circumstances (e.g. income, owner health issues, housing changes) In the study they found that dogs that were younger, owned for a shorter time, intact, mixed-breed, obtained from a friend, pet store, or shelter, had behavioral issues (house soiling, destructive, fearful, or bit someone) were relinquished more often. A study supported by the National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy stated that the number one reason for dog relinquishment was behavior problems. A 2012 American Humane Association study on retention of pets adopted from shelters, stated dogs who had seen a veterinarian, had a 93% chance of retention six-months post adoption. For dogs that had not seen a veterinarian, only 53% were retained. While the study does caution that the data may be attributed to the fact that if someone is unsure they will keep an animal, they may not have taken it to a veterinarian before deciding. However, if this data could be validated in another study, this could show the importance of veterinary intervention in early human-dog connections. As a veterinary student we are educated on many resources that can help our clients, but questions still remain. Will our clients use the resources provided to them to inform their decisions? How many clients are coming to veterinarians before they purchase a dog? How do we find more effective ways to communicate with prospective puppy owners before they have the dog and become bonded? These questions point to a need for greater understanding of where people are getting their dogs. Good breeders carefully screen potential buyers to try to insure a good match. Those selling dogs from other sources – commercial breeders, questionable online sources, etc – may not be so careful. For a further look at some of the complex issues related to acquisition of a purebred dog, see the module “How Can You Promote Informed Decision-Making in Acquiring a Purebred Dog?”
  9. Hello all! Brenda’s blog gave a great overview of the American Kennel Club National Parent Club Canine Health Conference we attended earlier this month in St. Louis, Missouri. I am grateful for the sponsorship from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals provided to myself and the 31 other veterinary students in attendance. This conference, like the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, was an opportunity to learn more about cutting edge research that is improving dog health. Topics were varied and included tick borne disease, epilepsy, lymphoma, and reproductive health. It was exciting to see my Colorado State University (CSU) Immunology professor, Dr. Anne Avery, present on her lymphoma research. Right: View from the top of the St. Louis Gateway Arch After completing a CSU clinical orthopedics rotation a few weeks prior to the conference, it was especially interesting to hear what I had learned about Omega-3 fatty acids in my rotation be reiterated by presenter Dr. Wendy Baltzer from Massey University. Her Purina funded study described that a diet high in Omega-3 fatty acids post-surgical correction of cranial cruciate ligament disease is helpful and results in less progression of arthritis and lameness. I’m am looking forward to graduation in 9 months and continued involvement in dog health. The opportunities I have received since first starting my IPFD project have been endless and I am very thankful for the DogWellNet.com community! Left: Veterinary Student Attendees at the AKC National Parent Club Health Conference
  10. With the 5-generation pedigree, we have reached the limits of printed genealogical documents. The future of purebred dog selection will be digital! The Société Centrale Canine has followed the good example of other Kennel clubs (The Kennel Club with Mate Select, Swedish Kennel Club with Avelsdata and Finnish Kennel Club with Koiranet) and developed a new decision support tool for breeders: LOF Select.
  11. Barbara Thiel graciously provided DWN's community with a book review - a great read for breed managers and breeders. "Managing Breeds for a Secure Future: Strategies for Breeders and Breed Associations" by D. Phillip Sponenberg, Jeannette Beranger and Alison Martin Originally published in 2007, Second Edition 2017
  12. SWEDEN Collaboration and problem solving -- brachycephalic breeds... thanks goes to the SKK for their continued work to address health and welfare issues in dog breeds. Here you will find information pertaining to management of brachycephalic dog breeds - discussion and actions - by representatives from Swedish Veterinary Association, the Swedish Board of Agriculture, the County Administrative Board, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and SKK. Many thanks go to SKK's Linda Andersson for sharing this write-up with the DogWellNet community.
  13. Dave St. Louis

    Genetic Testing

    Overview of Genetic Testing resources on DogWellNet.com. This is not a comprehensive listing - it is a starting point for finding relevant resources. Please visit the various areas of the site using the purple navigation bar and/or the Search function.
  14. Key DWN resources related to issues involved with understanding and management of extreme phenotype are provided here. The Brachycephalic Issue IDHW Plenary talks and suggested reading Country-Kennel Club specific programs DWN articles relevant DWN Blog posts Also see articles in this category.
  15. Brenda Bonnett

    Sweden: Breed Strategies

    In Sweden each breed club must produce a breeding strategy and health profile. We are continuing to build a resource of documents in English. These files can also be reached via the Breed Database page (if an English summary exists for the breed). Members can access The Swedish RAS (English) documents via Downloads at: http://dogwellnet.com/files/category/8-swedish-breeding-strategy-ras-documents-english-summary/ PLEASE - REGISTER TO ACCESS THESE DOCUMENTS Swedish RAS English Summaries are available for the following breeds (list reviewed 4-15-2018) Barbet: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/354-barbet-swedish-ras-english-summary/· Soft Coated Wheaton Terrier: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/275-irish-soft-coated-wheaten-terrier-breeding-strategy-finnish-kennel-club/· Borzoi|Teeth placement: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/278-bsi-borzoi-canine-teeth-placement/ · Poodle: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/286-poodle-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Portuguese Podengo: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/303-portuguese-podengo-ras-english/ · ChowChow: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/305-chow-chow-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Pug: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/312-pug-ras-breeding-strategy-english-summary/ · Swedish Valhund: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/313-swedish-vallhund-ras/ · Australian Shepherd: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/315-australian-shepherd-swedish-ras-breeding-strategy/ · Borzoi: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/316-borzoi-ras-breeding-strategy-2016-english-summary/ · Norbottenspitz: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/329-norrbottenspitz-ras-breeding-strategy-2016-english/ · Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/338-cavalier-king-charles-spaniel-ras-dwn-english-summary/ · Clumber Spaniel: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/75-clumber-spaniel-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Collie (rough|smooth) https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/77-collie-rough-smooth-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · French Bulldog: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/78-french-bulldog-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Golden Retreiver: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/79-golden-retriever-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Pomeranian: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/80-pomeranian-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Boston Terrier: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/83-boston-terrier-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Swedish Lapphund: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/365-breed-specific-breeding-strategy-for-swedish-lapphund-english-summary/
  16. Ann Milligan

    Breeding by the Numbers

    January 2018 ... From the AKC Gazette Jerold S. Bell, DVM. "Breeding by the Numbers." AKC Gazette. January 2018, pp 12-16. “A goal of all breeds is to grow and maintain a large, diverse, and healthy population.” Source: http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/211323a7#/211323a7/12
  17. Author: Dr Frédéric MAISON Membre du Comité de la SCC Président de la Commission d'élevage de la SCC
  18. The increasing availability of genetic screening tests, DNA tests, and now multiplex test panels also requires an understanding of what the tests tell you. View this presentation and learn: - The practical applications for using the results of these tests to improve the health of dogs - The dangers for the inappropriate use of genetic tests to dog health - The roles of the breeder, dog owner and veterinarian in utilizing genetic tests
  19. This is not a comprehensive listing - it is a starting point for finding relevant resources on DogWellNet. Overview of Genetic Testing resources https://dogwellnet.com/content/hot-topics/genetic-testing-r509/
  20. Dystocia (difficulties in giving birth) frequently requires veterinary intervention. Breed-specific characteristics can impact breeding and whelping ability; dystocia occurs more commonly in some breeds of dogs than others. Elective caesareans are not uncommon; neither are emergency caesareans, especially amongst large-headed/narrow-pelvic breeds and many toy breeds. A May 2017 paper, Canine dystocia in 50 UK first-opinion emergency-care veterinary practices: prevalence and risk factors (http://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/181/4/88) published in the Veterinary Record provides evidence and insights. (See more information on this latest VetCompass research below as well as an overview of BVA, BSAVA, RCVS and The Kennel Club's initiatives to gather evidence-based information to be used in creating welfare-conscious breed health management strategies.)
  21. "Brachycephalic syndrome (BS) describes the result of hereditary abnormalities occurring in dogs and cats from selective breeding for shorter heads and dorsorotation of the face. Although respiratory problems are the best recognised of the problems associated with BS, the problem is not limited to the respiratory tract, writes Kathryn M Pratschke, North East Veterinary Referrals, Northumberland Business Park West, UK"
  22. Last weekend I was honored to participate in the 2017 National Parent Club Canine Health Conference presented by the AKC Canine Health Foundation and Nestlé Purina PetCare, in St. Louis, Missouri. It is always great to interact with breeders and club reps that are so committed to the health and welfare of their dogs and their breeds. This meeting is a mix of breeders (106 parent clubs represented!), vets, and researchers and includes Board members from some of the collaborating organizations who sponsor research, including IPFD Partners and Sponsors: the AKC, the AKC-CHF and the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). The OFA sponsored 32 veterinary students to attend the meeting. Our IPFD 2016 Student Kelly Arthur was among the participants! The research covered a wide array of key topics - from ticks and infectious disease - epilepsy - latest developments in cancer - to issues of reproduction (see list of speakers and topics, below). What an impressive panel of speakers and internationally renowned researchers. It was great to see two of our speakers from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Jason Stull and Rowena Packer, as well as numerous others who participated in that meeting. It certainly feels like the international community of those committed to dog health, well-being and welfare is going strong! Thanks to the many people who stopped by the IPFD table to talk to us about our organization, DogWellNet.com and especially the Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs initiative (and to grab some chocolate to keep their energy up!). Special thanks to CA Sharpe, from our IPFD Collaborating Partner Australian Shepherd Health & Genetics Institute (ASHGI) for helping me out at the table. It was very gratifying for me to hear someone else talking so enthusiastically about our efforts. Congrats to AKC-CHF for their continued strength and leadership; for promoting multi-disciplinary interaction; and for an exciting conference. Attached is the PDF of the slides of my talk (slightly altered, of course) and the abstract. BONNETT - AKC-CHF Presentation - Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs BONNETT Abstract - CHF June 2017 The 2017 AKC-CHF Conference Program included presentations on the following topics... Lymphoma & Epigenetics - Jeffrey Bryan, DVM, PhD, DACVIM-Oncology Lymphoma & Flow Cytometry - Anne Avery, VMD, PhD Chemotherapy & FortiFlora® - Korinn Saker DVM, PhD, DACVN Genetics of Cancer/Lymphoma - Matthew Breen, PhD Diet & Rehabilitation - Wendy Baltzer DVM, PhD, DACVS Genetic Predisposition to Infections - Urs Giger, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DECVCP Lyme Disease - Jason Stull, VMD, PhD, DACVPM Tick-Borne Disease - Ed Breitschwerdt, DVM, DACVIM (*Keynote) Ehrlichia & Lymphocytosis - Anne Avery, VMD, PhD Canine Cognition - Bill Milgram, PhD Genetics of Epilepsy - Gary Johnson, DVM, PhD Epilepsy & the Microbiome - Karen Munana, DVM, PhD, DACVIM-Neurology Epilepsy & Nutrition - Rowena Packer, PhD IPFD: Harmonization of Laboratory Genetic Testing for Dogs - Brenda Bonnett, DVM, PhD Semen Evaluation, Quality, and Effects of Aging - Stuart Meyers, DVM, PhD, DACT Brucella Update - Angela Arenas, DVM, PhD, DACVP Pyometra - Marco Coutinho da Silva, DVM, PhD, DACT New for 2017! Panel discussions with our speakers on: Canine Lymphoma Tick-Borne Diseases Epilepsy Reproductive Diseases AKC-CHF Facebook
  23. Antimicrobial resistant infections can be lethal to immunocompromised dogs such as puppies and seniors. It is important that we use antimicrobials properly. The purpose of this article is to: Provide strategies to help prevent development of resistant infections while keeping your dog’s health as the number one priority. Highlight special considerations organized by life stages of the dog - from breeding and whelping to puppyhood to senior years. Let's not be breeding super bugs when we are breeding dogs!
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