Jump to content
International Collaboration For Dog Health And Welfare. Join Us.

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'cavalier king charles spaniel'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • About IPFD
    • About Us
    • IPFD Board
    • DogWellNet.com Digest
    • IPFD News
    • IPFD in the Media
    • More on DogWellNet.com
    • More on our Partners and Collaborators
    • Disclaimers & Policies
    • Press
  • Hot Topics
    • Brachycephalics
    • Antimicrobial Resistance / Prudent Use of Antibiotics
  • IPFD International Dog Health Workshops
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshop #4
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshop #3
    • 2nd International Dog Health Workshop
    • 1st International Dog Health Workshop
  • Health and Breeding
    • Breed-Specific Approaches
    • Health and Screening Tests
    • Breeding
    • Breeds
  • Population Data on Dogs, Health and Disease
    • Sources of Population Data
    • General Principles
    • Breed Club Health Surveys
    • Disease | Condition-Specific Articles
  • Welfare
    • Welfare and Health
    • Sourcing and Commercial Breeding
    • Dog-Specific Legislation and Programs
    • Human-Dog Interactions
  • Education
    • Education for Judges
    • Education for Youth
    • Education for Veterinary Professionals
    • Education of Consumers and the Public
    • Education of Breeders
  • Research
  • HGTD Quality Database
  • HGTD Genetic Counselling
  • International Actions

Categories

  • Pedigreed Breeds
  • Additional Breed Resources
  • Native Breeds

Categories

  • Partners and Sponsors
    • Contributing Partners
    • Collaborating Partners
    • Sponsors

Categories

  • Quick Start
  • Your Account
  • Navigation
  • Participating in the Community
  • Using the DogWellNet Forums
  • Technical Issues

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Regulations
    • Government Regulations
    • Kennel Club Regulations
  • Swedish Insurance Data
  • Swedish Breeding Strategy (RAS) Documents (English Summary)
  • Breed-Specific Documents
  • Welfare and Health
    • Health Conditions
  • Breed Club Health Surveys
  • Breeding
  • Behaviour / Temperament
  • IDHW Files
    • 1st IDHW
    • 2nd IDHW
    • IPFD IDHW #3
    • 4th IDHW
  • Shared Educational and Event Resources
    • General
    • Education of Consumers and Public
    • Education for Breeders
  • Peer Reviewed Research Articles
  • PUBLIC Logos and Style Guides
  • Finnish Breeding Strategy (JTO) documents (English Summary)
  • Norwegian Breeding Strategies - English Summaries
  • The Kennel Club Breed Health Conservation Plan

Media Categories

  • IPFD Videos
  • Brachycephalics
  • Behaviour and Training
  • Canine Genetics
  • Health and Welfare

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Region


Location


Country


Current Affiliation


Position / Title


Interests


I am participating in:


Expertise/Proficiencies


Other Information on Interests or Expertise


Specific Breed(s) of Interest


Breed Club / Health Committee Name and URL


Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 10 results

  1. Pilot study of head conformation changes over time in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel breed https://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/184/4/122.full Breed Specific: Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: Conformation Traits/SM|CM Knowler, SP., Gillstedt, L., Mitchell, TJ., Jovanovik, J., Volk, HA., Rusbridge, C. (2019) Pilot study of head conformation changes over time in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel breed Veterinary Record 184, 122. Abstract Modern interpretation of head conformation in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel (CKCS) has favoured a smaller, more exaggerated, brachycephalic type than originally described in the 1929 breed standard. Recent research studies identified brachycephaly and reduced hind cranium as two conformational (dysmorphic) features that increase risk for symptomatic Chiari-like malformation and secondary syringomyelia (SM). A prospective pilot study investigated the hypothesis that dysmorphic head features could be assessed visually and correlated with risk of SM. Thirteen CKCS, selected from anonymised photographic evidence, were physically appraised by authorised Kennel Club judges using a head shape checklist. These subjective evaluations were then matched with objective measurements of the cranium (cephalic index and rostrocaudal doming) and their subsequent MRI. A positive correlation (P=0.039) between the judges’ checklist score and rostrocaudal doming (hindskull ratio) and a positive correlation between the cephalic index and hindskull ratio (P=0.042) were identified. Five CKCS had no SM and their status tallied with 62 per cent of the judges’ evaluation. Although the ability of adjudicators to identify differences in head conformation varied, there was sufficient association between the dysmorphic parameters and the risk of SM to cause concern and propose a larger study in CKCS breed. Breeder viewpoint: This research paper is a readily understandable PILOT study that covers how head shapes relate to scientific information on SM/CM in Cavaliers. Which skull shapes represent identifiable extremes and can/should anything be done to curtail the drift towards hypertype over the past few decades? Which direction do the breed enthusiasts want to go? In the Discussion section, "breeders have acknowledged that there has been a more brachycephalic interpretation of the breed standard over the last few decades." Further, " The concept that increased exaggeration of head shape in the CKCS can be recognised visually and supported by the proven association of brachycephaly with resulting rostrocaudal doming5 suggests the possibility for selection against the extreme head shape in the CKCS to enable a reduction in CM/SM incidence." Take a look at this study for photos that represent different shapes and measurements of CKCS head type/backskulls. Maybe it's worth considering the information offered when choosing dogs for showing and breeding. Yes, it's a small study - and yes, there is some variation in interpretation of the degree to which dogs viewed are visibly extreme, and, there are Limitations to the study that are outlined by the researchers. But given the possible relationship between squished backskulls and their potential association with SM/CM and its impact on the quality of life for dogs - maybe this research is worth a glance for breeders and for judges. Lots of illustrations and pictures were helpful. Breed Advisor viewpoint: Veterinary Epidemiologist viewpoint:
  2. February 2019 We'd like to call your attention to two posts in DWN's New Research Blog. Consequences and Management of Canine Brachycephaly in Veterinary Practice: Perspectives from Australian Veterinarians and Veterinary Specialists See Brenda Bonnet's review of this research coming from Austalia that "covers the health problems and welfare issues in brachycephalic dogs highlighting a veterinary perspective."
  3. IPFD CEO Dr. Brenda Bonnett is among the experts featured in a new Smithsonian Magazine article examining how traits that make brachycephalic dogs adorable also threaten their health and well-being.
  4. Concerns have been raised over breed-related health issues in purebred dogs, but reliable prevalence estimates for disorders within specific breeds are sparse. Electronically stored patient health records from primary-care practice are emerging as a useful source of epidemiological data in companion animals. This study used large volumes of health data from UK primary-care practices participating in the VetCompass animal health surveillance project to evaluate in detail the disorders diagnosed in a random selection of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs). Study findings suggest that many of the disorders commonly affecting CKCSs are largely similar to those affecting the general dog population presented for primary veterinary care in the UK. However, cardiac disease (and MVD in particular) continues to be of particular concern in this breed.
  5. Corneal ulcerative disease in dogs under primary veterinary care in England: epidemiology and clinical management Dan G. O’Neill, Monica M. Lee, Dave C. Brodbelt, David B. Church and Rick F. Sanchez https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575-017-0045-5 https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s40575-017-0045-5?site=cgejournal.biomedcentral.com
  6. Version 1.0.0

    18 downloads

    SCKCS – Cavaliersällskapet | Specialklubben för Cavalier King Charles Thanks to Karin Drotz, Breeding Consultant, Department for Breeding and Health, Svenska Kennelklubben for sharing the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel breeding strategy translation with DWN.
  7. French Bulldogs and more: Taking the temperature on brachycephalic health March 8, 2017 Bringing big data to bear on health concerns "In 2013, Nationwide pet health insurance, then operating under the name of Veterinary Pet Insurance® or VPI®, decided to use its peerless database of pet health insurance claims to develop both medical and financial studies. The goal was to produce analyses that would assist pet owners and members of the veterinary community in making sound decisions around pet health and the business of veterinary medicine."
  8. A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds P. Sandøe, S. V. Kondrup1, P. C. Bennett, B. Forkman, I Meyer, H. F. Proschowsky,J. A. Serpell, T. B. Lund This newly published peer-reviewed research is available in DWN Downloads. external link: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0172091.t001 "An array of previous studies thus indicates that both physical and behavioral attributes of dogs may have an impact on how attractive a specific breed or breed characteristic is perceived to be. However, as far as we are aware, no previous study has investigated the motivational patterns behind peoples' choices between dog breeds, or how these relate to the quality of the relationship between owners and dogs of specific breeds. To address this issue, we surveyed a representative sample of owners of four different breeds of dogs (two with extreme phenotypes, one with a high load of inherited diseases and one relatively healthy) with the overall goal of examining their motivations for acquiring their dog, the health and behavior problems encountered, and the quality of relationships between the dog owners and their dogs."
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.