Jump to content

International Collaboration For Dog Health And Welfare. Join Us.

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'germany'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • About IPFD
    • About Us
    • IPFD Board
    • DogWellNet.com Digest
    • IPFD News
    • IPFD in the Media
    • More on DogWellNet.com
    • More on our Partners and Collaborators
    • Disclaimers & Policies
    • Press
  • Hot Topics
    • Brachycephalics
    • Antimicrobial Resistance / Prudent Use of Antibiotics
  • IPFD International Dog Health Workshops
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshop #4
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshop #3
    • 2nd International Dog Health Workshop
    • 1st International Dog Health Workshop
  • Health and Breeding
    • Breed-Specific Approaches
    • Health and Screening Tests
    • Breeding
    • Breeds
  • Population Data on Dogs, Health and Disease
    • Sources of Population Data
    • General Principles
    • Breed Club Health Surveys
    • Disease | Condition-Specific Articles
  • Welfare
    • Welfare and Health
    • Sourcing and Commercial Breeding
    • Dog-Specific Legislation and Programs
    • Human-Dog Interactions
  • Education
    • Education for Judges
    • Education for Youth
    • Education for Veterinary Professionals
    • Education of Consumers and the Public
    • Education of Breeders
  • Research
  • HGTD Quality Database
  • HGTD Genetic Counselling
  • International Actions

Categories

  • Pedigreed Breeds
  • Additional Breed Resources
  • Native Breeds

Categories

  • Overview
    • History and Media Resources
    • IPFD News
  • Who We Are
    • Leadership
    • IPFD Annual Reports
  • Partners and Sponsors
    • Contributing Partners
    • Collaborating Partners
    • Sponsors
  • What We Do
    • DogWellNet.com
    • Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshops (IDHWs)
  • How We Work
    • The IPFD Approach
    • Policies and Disclaimers
  • Where We Work
  • Get Involved

Categories

  • Quick Start
  • Your Account
  • Navigation
  • Participating in the Community
  • Using the DogWellNet Forums
  • Technical Issues

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Regulations
    • Government Regulations
    • Kennel Club Regulations
  • Swedish Insurance Data
  • Swedish Breeding Strategy (RAS) Documents (English Summary)
  • Breed-Specific Documents
  • Welfare and Health
    • Health Conditions
  • Breed Club Health Surveys
  • Breeding
  • Behaviour / Temperament
  • IDHW Files
    • 1st IDHW
    • 2nd IDHW
    • IPFD IDHW #3
    • 4th IDHW
  • Shared Educational and Event Resources
    • General
    • Education of Consumers and Public
    • Education for Breeders
  • Peer Reviewed Research Articles
  • PUBLIC Logos and Style Guides
  • Finnish Breeding Strategy (JTO) documents (English Summary)
  • Norwegian Breeding Strategies - English Summaries
  • The Kennel Club Breed Health Conservation Plan

Product Groups

There are no results to display.

Media Categories

  • IPFD Videos
  • Brachycephalics
  • Behaviour and Training
  • Canine Genetics
  • Health and Welfare

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Region


Location


Country


Current Affiliation


Position / Title


Interests


I am participating in:


Expertise/Proficiencies


Other Information on Interests or Expertise


Specific Breed(s) of Interest


Breed Club Rep; Board Member or Breeding/ Health Committee member


Breed Club / Health Committee Name and URL


Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 24 results

  1. photo source: http://dgk.dk/wp-content/uploads/Diskusprolaps-hos-gravhunde_Charlotte-Mørck-Andersen-Tine-Marx.pdf
  2. His nature is similar to that of the Schnauzer and is determined by the temperament and the behaviour of a small dog. Intelligence, fearlessness, endurance and alertness make the Miniature Schnauzer an agreeable house dog as well as a watch and companion dog which can be kept even in a small apartment without problems.
  3. The Dobermann breed requires a medium sized, powerful, muscular dog. Despite his substance he shall be elegant and noble, which will be evident in his body line. He must be exceptionally suitable as a companion, protection and working dog and also as a family dog.
  4. The Great Dane in his noble appearance combines a large, powerful well constructed body with pride, strength and elegance.
  5. These Mastiff-type dogs stem from animals taken to Germany by Roman soldiers as they marched across Europe. Used to guard livestock, they were either discarded as the cattle were eaten or were left to guard outposts, and many finished up in Switzerland while others reached southern Germany. They were especially known around the town of Rottweil, which for 1,800 years was a centre for livestock trading. The evolving dog became a butcher’s dog, drover and draught dog. The Rottweiler, which first appeared in Britain in 1936 and was shown at Crufts the following year, is an above average-sized, very agile, black-and-tan dog. Extremely strong and imposing, he is easily obedience trained and is, in fact, a dog that enjoys working. He has natural guarding instincts, but is not aggressive by nature. His expression is tranquil and kind, but when aroused, he will hold his own with any opponent. He is not a dog for the inexperienced and has been much maligned in recent years, when the breed became over-popular, and Rottweilers were often purchased to feed a macho image.
  6. IKFB: French Bulldog Club (Germany) - Walking test for French Bulldog, Pugs and English Bulldogs Also see: DWN's article on the IKFB - Dr. Anne Posthoff, the president of the German International Club for French Bulldogs, explains why the rules for breeding French Bulldogs in Germany are amongst the strictest in the world. Hot Topics - Brachycephalics, archive - DWN and Extremes of Conformation - Brachycephalics
  7. The VDH - Verband für das Deutsche Hundewesen (German Kennel Club in English) is the foremost organisation representing the interests of dog-owners throughout Germany – the first address to find out everything there is to know on the subject of life with dogs, on dog sports and on dog breeding. As an umbrella organisation for its 175 member clubs the VDH today represents more than 650,000 members. Website: http://www.vdh.de/en/home/ An overview of the VDH (in German) can be found at: http://www.vdh.de/ueber-den-vdh/wir-ueber-uns/. "The VDH is the leading advocacy of all dog owners in Germany - the primary authority on life with dogs, dog sports and dog breeds. As the umbrella organization for 175 member associations of the VDH today represents more than 650,000 members." This page contains links to 32 breeds whose standards are managed by VDH, VDH Staff and Committee's contacts, VDH Statutes & Regulations, the Organization Structure/composition, Registration Statistics for breeds from 2000-2014, a link to VDH History and a link to VDH's Annual Report. Also see the: Rasselexikon (BREEDOPEDIA) - http://www.vdh.de/welpen/rasse A comprehensive online reference of 343 breeds including a detailed description of each breed which covers the general appearance, the character, the history and coat. Some breed profiles contain a video presentation (in German). In addition: the Breedopedia includes addresses of VDH member clubs and breeders with VDH-seal of approval. The breed listing is alphabetical and a specific breed search function is available.
  8. Table of Contents: News & Highlights IPFD Contributors' YouTube Resources Helpful Hint Stay Informed!
  9. An imperturbable dog, prepared for defense, whose appearance fills with respect. Typical characteristics of this dog are his good natured, even temperament and his incorruptible loyalty towards his master. He has highly developed sense organs, intelligence, trainability, strength, endurance, speed, resistance to weather and diseases. His inborn ability to bear strain and his self assurance make him best suited for being a companion, sporting, utility and working dog.
  10. NOTE: LANDSEER ECT is not the same breed of dog as the black and white 'Landseer' Newfoundland Newfoundland - Landseer History Newfoundland, Landseer or both? Actually, there are 3 versions: The American Newfoundland Landseer, the European Newfoundland Landseer and the European Landseer ECT. The USA (AKC) recognizes both European and American Newfoundland Landseers but does not recognize the 3rd version, the Landseer ECT, as a version of the Newfoundland or even as a breed. The Newfoundland Club of America addresses the question: "What is an ECT? ECT stands for "European Continental Type". ECT's or Landseer ECT's as they are sometimes called, resemble Landseers, but are different in type and temperament. An ECT is a little taller, a little less broad, and to the person familiar with Newfs, just looks "different" than a Newf. ECT's tend to have a more "active" personality, and require an owner ready to live with a large dog which is more assertive than a typical Newf." "As of 1998, Every country except the U.S. and Canada recognize the ECT as a separate breed from the Newfoundland."
  11. Balanced, well constructed medium sized dog of Spitz type with prick ears and coat in varied colours. Length of coat should be such as still to reveal the body proportions. With medium bone.Balanced, well constructed medium sized dog of Spitz type with prick ears and coat in varied colours. Length of coat should be such as still to reveal the body proportions. With medium bone. Self-assured, calm, even tempered with high resistance against any provocation.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.