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Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

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  1. IPFD has an ongoing role to report on international activities for health and welfare for dogs and to serve as an information hub. Issues with brachycephalic dogs continue to be at the forefront of health efforts by many stakeholders. Our partners at the Swedish Kennel Club have recently posted information on two initiatives involving 'Trubbnosar' (short nosed) breeds. 1. We previously posted information on the activities of the SKK in brachycephalic health , as well as, a new, collaborative research study on an inventory of dogs of several brachycephalic breeds and their health status. "The purpose of the inventory is to create a better picture of the respective breed's situation, genetic width and exterior variation. The hope is to find sufficient variation both exterior and genetic to ensure a healthy development of these breeds with the reduction of BOAS-related health problems." There is a notice on the SKK site of events where individuals are being invited to bring their dogs to participate. Great to see that this effort involves research, grass-root support, gives individual owners an evaluation of their dog and brings awareness to health and welfare issues in these breeds. 2. As of next year, the Swedish Kennel Club is expanding the rules concerning show dogs with health issues, especially breathing problems. "Dogs have been disqualified due to ill health since 1998 but now SKK will tighten up the penalties." In an effort to make sure affected dogs are not used in breeding programs, dogs disqualified from the show ring because of ill health may be excluded from "all forms of exhibition, exams, competitions and breeding". It seems the program will incorporates 'due process' that may involve additional review, veterinary examinations and the possibility of appeals. The hope is surely that breeders/owners will (eventually) be discouraged from bringing affected dogs into the ring and that, therefore, the dogs seen by the public and used in breeding will tend towards less extreme, healthy individuals. See: https://www.skk.se/sv/nyheter/2019/2/osunda-hundar-kan-stangas-av/ Note: my translator unfortunately gives me "Unhealthy dogs can be turned off" as the (literal) title of this article... but clearly meaning they can be 'eliminated' in some sense. We are working on an inventory of all of our brachycephalic resources... and we will continue to highlight efforts by all of our Partners.
  2. Thanks to VDH (the German Kennel Club) and our friend and collaborator, veterinarian Barbara Thiel, please see attached press release about their latest efforts to support brachycephalic health and welfare. They state that their goal is to identify "the most resilient dogs among the pug population in order to establish the healthiest possible pool of dogs for breeding". Pug fitness test Germany 2019.pdf The new effort in German exemplifies several important approaches: It has been developed collaboratively across various stakeholder groups including the VDH, academics, and veterinary organizations. The test is "available not only to dogs bred under VDH supervision, but to all pugs". The test is done under controlled, standardized and well-supervised conditions. And fantastically, it is being offered for free for two years courtesy of the German Society for the Support of Canine Research (GFK) . Congatulations to VDH and its partners for this excellent program and thanks for sharing the information with us. Great to see collaboration focused on dog well-being making a difference. Links at VDH (in German) Neuer Fitnesstest für Möpse GKF Flyer 2019 We have descriptions of fitness tests from other countries on DogWellNet.com, see for example: Sweden: Swedish Kennel Club: Making assessments of dogs' respiration - BSI (Video Link) https://dogwellnet.com/media/media/5-making-assessments-of-dogs-respiration-bsi/ Bullies, Pugs and Bulldogs – the current top runners Germany: IKFB: (Includes Video Link) https://dogwellnet.com/content/health-and-breeding/breed-specific-programs/breed-specific-breeding-strategies/breed-specific-programs-country/bullies-pugs-and-bulldogs-–-the-current-top-runners-r232/ Finnish walk test for brachycephalic breeds ready https://dogwellnet.com/blogs/entry/88-finnish-walk-test-for-brachycephalic-breeds-ready Scheme launched to improve health of French Bulldogs, Pugs and Bulldogs - The Kennel Club | Cambridge https://dogwellnet.com/content/hot-topics/brachycephalics/scheme-launched-to-improve-health-of-french-bulldogs-pugs-and-bulldogs-the-kennel-club-cambridge-r636/
  3. Thanks to our co-hosts, The Kennel Club, the 4th International Dog Health Workshop was a great success. The consensus seems to be that the IDHWs just keep getting better and better. This is due in great part to the efforts of the attendees - decision leaders from 18 countries, representing all stakeholders in dog health and welfare - including representatives from research, the veterinary world, welfare organizations, kennel and breed organizations, and more. Stellar plenary speakers set the tone for intense and productive breakout sessions in the various themes. The themes were: Genetics, Breed-Specific Breeding Strategies, The Concept of Breed and its Impact on Health, Supply and Demand, and Extremes of Conformation. Below you will find links to fantastic pre- and post-workshop materials. Be sure to check in to DogWellNet.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for important updates from the several working groups who are already moving ahead with needed actions. As seen in the word cloud from our participants, a key aspect of this meeting is collaboration and networking. Coming together with others who are dealing with similar challenges and who share a commitment to health dogs provides a boost of energy for both cooperative efforts as well as the day to day work by these committed dog people. Below you will also see reports and write ups about the 4th IDHW, and there will be more as the work continues. Thanks to all who attended, and we will keep you informed on developing plans for the 5th IDHW in 2021. 4th IDHW Pre- and Post-Meeting Resources From pre-meeting reading material to posters and slide presentations from the workshop, we've compiled materials from the 4th IDHW, so that participants can refer back to them - and so that those who were unable to attend can also benefit from this impressive collection of downloadable resources. Pre-Meeting Resources | Post Meeting Resources Articles on the 4th IDHW Vet Record News: 4th IDHW workshop - "Improving the health of pedigree dogs" Lance Novak, Executive Director, Canadian Kennel Club: From My Side of the Desk: Canine Health and Wellness Several articles by Ian J. Seath of the Dachshund Breed Council (DBC): My report on the 4th International Dog Health Workshop for Our Dogs My presentation to the 4th International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW4) Breed Health Strategies – Addressing the challenges: My July 2019 “Best of Health” article The why and how of Breed-specific Health Strategies – “Best of Health” June 2019 Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi's Report from the Genetic Testing Theme, from the 4th International Dog Health Workshop Canine Genetics and Epidemiology Journal. As following the 3rd IDHW, we are compiling a report on the 4th that will be review and published by our collaborating partners at CGE. If you haven't seen the previous article, check it out here. Global Pet Obesity Initiative After an overwhelming show of support by attendees of the 4th IDHW, IPFD has confirmed its support of the Global Pet Obesity Initiative Position Statement (launched by The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP)) calling for the veterinary profession to adopt uniform nomenclature for canine and feline obesity. IPFD is currently in discussions with APOP to look at ways to collaborate on the important issue of canine obesity.
  4. As many of you may know, there has been a lot of focus of health and welfare issues in brachycephalics and in the spring information about Pugs in the Netherlands. The situation of government regulations on dog breeding is a complex one, and without appropriate inclusion of all relevant stakeholders, we cannot be sure that the best interests of dogs will be served. Our partners the Dutch Kennel Club have been working intensely with various groups and have come out with their thoughtful and evidence-based recommendations in the attached breeding strategy document. Thanks to veterinarian Laura Roest for sending us this communication. Dear reader, Enclosed you find the translated proposal the Dutch Kennel Club ‘Raad van Beheer’ has sent to the Dutch Government. This is not a certified translation, but gives us the opportunity to inform the international community. Please feel free to ask questions regarding the document. In March 2019, the report “BREEDING BRACHYCEPHALIC DOGS*" was published in The Netherlands (in Dutch) with enforcement criteria for the breeding of brachycephalic dogs. These criteria were active from that day onwards. The Raad van Beheer concurs with almost all criteria and wishes to adapt them in its own regulations, in close collaboration with the involved breed clubs. The Raad van Beheer does not agree with the Craniofacial Ratio (CFR) as a prohibiting criterion for breeding. This criterion would make it impossible to breed certain breeds while the prognostic value and the reproducibility of the CFR are being questioned among scientists. The Raad van Beheer wants an exception for the regulated pedigree breeding, so these breeds can be bred in The Netherlands in a healthy form and with the effort to achieve a longer muzzle. We hope to receive soon a positive reaction on our proposal from our Government and we will keep the International Dog World posted! Kind regards, Laura Roest, DVM and Gabri Kolster Board Member Raad van Beheer Breeding Commission Dutch Kennel Club ‘Raad van Beheer’ Translated version: English... Breeding strategy brachycephalic dogs in the Netherlands.pdf Also see: background articles/resources: Stricter rules for breeding brachy dogs https://dogzine.eu/en/newsarticle/stricter-rules-breeding-brachy-dogs *FOKKEN MET KORTSNUITIGE HONDEN (Dutch) Fokken_met_kortsnuitige_honden_.pdf
  5. Following on from my blog on the Seminar for the FBDCA we are thrilled to find that the French Bulldog Club of England has shared their Breed Health and Conservation Plan (BHCP). Link here; PDF attached, below. These plans are being assembled by the health team at The Kennel Club, until recently spearheaded by Katy Evans (now the Jane H. Booker Chair in Canine Genetics at The Seeing Eye in the USA). Similar to coverage in my talk (video link here), the focus is very broad in the BHCP and makes clear the challenges ahead for this breed, internationally. The BHCP incorporates statistics from Sweden and Britain, from our IPFD Partners Agria Pet Insurance/Agria Djurförsäkring and VetCompass. Work like the BHCPs in the UK, Breed-specific Breeding Strategies from Sweden (RAS) and Finland (JTO) and others will be incorporated into our new development, the IPFD Health Strategy Database for Dogs (HSDD) coming soon. Then we will be able to provide an interactive resource where 'all' health information can be accessed to inform the great efforts being made by groups throughout the world. Congrats and thanks to The KC and the French Bulldog Club of England. breed_health_and_conservation_plan_-_french_bulldog_final__1_.pdf Blog Disclaimer The contents of this blog are for informational purposes only and represent the opinion of the author(s), and not that of the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD). This is not intended to be a substitute for professional, expert or veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. We do not recommend or endorse any specific tests, providers, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on, or linked to from this blog.
  6. Many national kennel clubs, other cynological organizations (e.g. breed clubs) have developed guidelines, approaches or programs to: describe and evaluate the health of specific breeds outline guidelines or regulations for screening tests or other assessments on potential breeding dogs raise awareness about issues in a given breed. These programs take different forms in different countries. In this section we will provide information on various approaches and programs and direct you to online resources. For general guidelines (not breed-specific) see also: country-specific General Breeding and Ethical Guidelines. Countries: Austria: Austrian Kennel Club - Response to Animal Welfare Legislation The Austrian Kennel Club ( Österreichische Kynologenverband - ÖKV ) initiated a project, "Konterqual", to address legislative concerns. Sharing work like this can help to inform other kennel clubs and countries dealing with similar issues. In addition to presenting the facts and outcomes, it is so helpful to be able to see the process, to follow what steps were taken. Personal experiences, what works, what doesn't ... all these help others. We look forward to further information from Austria on developments and outcomes of this program. Nordic Kennel Union: The Nordic Kennel Union is a cooperative organisation for the Kennel Clubs of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Below we list efforts made to address exaggerations in breeds through the NKU country's BSI. There are six basic criteria defining if a breed should be listed as a high profile breed. Breeds which fulfill these and are thus listed are particularly paid attention to at dog show judging by the judge. Sweden: Svenska Kennelklubben (The Swedish Kennel Club) Breed-Specific Breeding Strategy Program For Judges see: Breed Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. Breed Specific Strategies BSI - Presentation DHW, Dortmund Germany - Göran Bodegård SKK "The BSI program has been routinely applied in Sweden from 2009 – and at present generated more than ten thousand reports. From 2012 the program is embraced and worked through by all the Nordic countries and the latest edition ( NKU BSI 2014) is founded on the compound experience in the Nordic countries regarding the identification of areas of risk in a selected number of high profile breeds during the last decade. The structure of the NKU BSI is thus actually an inventory which allows for a continuous follow up and dynamic revisions of the BSI." SKK Genetic Programmes "Genetic health programmes are one of the tools used by the SKK (the Swedish Kennel Club) to manage hereditary disease. The SKK implemented the use of screening programmes to improve health in Swedish dogs more than 30 years ago. The first programmes concerned hip dysplasia and hereditary eye diseases. More recently, programmes for other heritable conditions, such as elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation and heart disease have been developed. Health programmes are based on breed-specific needs and have been introduced on request from and in consultation with the breed clubs." Finland: Breed Specific Instructions (BSI): Finland 2015 The Finnish Kennel Club has published new Breed-Specific Instructions for dog show judges. The instructions were drafted with the purpose of steering dog show judges to pay closer attention to exaggerated breed types. The new instructions entered into force on 1 June 2015. The Finnish Kennel Club's breeding strategy applies to all breeds. It outlines the main principles and objectives in breeding, and aims to improve genetic health of dogs. Find out what the breeding strategy means in your breed Finnish Kennel Club: General Breeding Strategy The UK: The Kennel Club What the Kennel Club does for Dog Health The report encompasses much of the work undertaken in recent years and includes detailed sections on: How The Kennel Club promotes health through education Initiatives designed to improve health awareness in dog shows How The Kennel Club promotes and progresses scientific research How The Kennel Club encourages responsible breeding of healthy dogs. Breed Watch The info graphic below provides information. Also see: High Profile Breeds Veterinary Health Checks for Best of Breed winners. BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS September 2016 News -- What is the new project at The Kennel Club? Breed Health & Conservation Plan -- The Kennel Club To learn more about the Breed Health and Conservation Project see... BHCP PDF.pdf Kennel Club Launching Breed Health And Conservation Plans The Kennel Club is launching its Breed Health and Conservation Plans project, a dynamic new resource to support breed clubs and individual breeders. This exciting new project will use evidence-based criteria to help identify common breed specific health concerns. Breeders will be provided with information and breeding resources to help them improve the health of their puppies and breed. We at DWN look forward to learning more about the good work done by Dr. Katy Evans and Bonnie Wiles and the UK Breed Clubs! 15 December 2018 - VET RECORD... The UK: Being a breed health coordinator Liz Branscombe describes what the role is and how it can help improve breed health for pedigree dogs,,, Perspective as well as links to DBRG's and The Kennel Club's resources for owners, BHC's, researchers and veterinarians. https://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/…/vetr…/183/23/722.full.pdf "Breed Health Co-ordinators are individuals working on behalf of breed clubs and councils who are advocates for the health and welfare of their chosen breed." If you have a health related questions concerning a particular breed, we recommend contacting the Breed Health Co-ordinator through the your local Breed club, a list of which is available via the "Find a dog club" link on the Kennel Club's Breed Information Centre. TOOLKITS FOR BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS Website Content Toolkit Website Enhancement Toolkit BREED HEALTH IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
  7. The Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) is the primary registry body for purebred dogs in Canada and currently recognizes 175 breeds. As a non-profit organization, the CKC is dedicated to encouraging, guiding, and advancing the interests of purebred dogs and their responsible owners and breeders in Canada and promoting the knowledge and understanding of the benefits which dogs can bring to Canadian society.
  8. In this section we link to ongoing research projects of interest and relevance to dog breeding. These may relate to specific conditions, e.g. inherited conditions, or which focus on innovative approaches or population studies. In addition, we will link to research institutes and profile partnerships between researchers and breed clubs. Eventually, we hope to describe models of research partnerships and help connect dog breeders and researchers.
  9. This is a translation of an article by Åsa Linholm which will appear in the Swedish Kennel Club magazine: Hundsport Special nr 2:2016. Introduction: The hottest topic in the Swedish dog world in summer of 2015 has been brachycephalic (flat-faced) dogs and their health. In February 2016 the Swedish Kennel Club arranged a conference on the subject, an arrangement that was right in time, but in fact was planned since 2014.
  10. I have frequently heard people say that what they are doing is 'for the dogs'' when it might seem it is mainly for their own goals.- but the Swedish Kennel Club has posted an informative video about the Breed Specific Instructions that makes it clear that the only goal with this program is to promote the health and welfare of dogs. Renowned judges explain why they think their role in promoting health and welfare is so important. We have lots of information on the BSI and the Swedish Breed-Specific Breeding Strategies, in general (as well as, lists of breeds with breed specific strategies from several countries on DogWellNet.com and this video really puts it all in perspective. We all know that health and welfare of dogs is the responsibility of all stakeholders in the dog world and judges are no exception. The impact of dog shows and the awarding of wins to specific dogs has a big impact on the public perception of pedigree dogs, in general, and also of specific breeds. It is crucial that dogs that achieve success in these increasingly 'prime time', public displays epitomize the best of the best - not just in looks, but also in health. All organizations licensing dog judges insist on 'judges education' but the BSI program takes it a step further, insisting that judges take responsibility in only promoting dogs without physical manifestations of conditions/ conformations that may limit health and welfare. The BSI process is followed in all Scandinavian countries, as well as several other European countries. A key part of the BSI process is the completion of reports by the judges (discussed in the video); and here is a link to an example of a report required for German Shepherd Dogs by Rad van Beheer in The Netherlands. The Canadian Kennel Club instituted an observer program in 2017, but I haven't found full details on the goals of the program. The AKC has a Field Rep program and, although at the moment I do not think these North American programs have breed-specific requirements similar to the BSI, clearly there are structures in place that could facilitate such an approach. A striking comment in the video was that judges must be on the lookout for negative trends and help ensure that these do not progress. I am not a judge; I briefly showed dogs in the distant past; and I am often concerned by what I see at show events. I was recently at the National Specialty of the French Bulldog Club of America in Louisville, KY, USA, at the end of October 2018. It was an honor to talk to the club members who are concerned about health issues in this breed. However, I was confused by seeing many dogs being shown that clearly had no actual tails (maybe 2 coccyx vertebrae), clearly so in the eyes of this veterinarian, and described as such by the competitors as a recent trend. And yet, I was repeatedly assured that 'the standard specifies that a French Bulldog must have a tail'. Such a contradiction, such an extreme, would presumably not be allowed, under the BSI, especially when this is not a cosmetic change, but a structural one. It is particularly concerning given that we know that French Bulldogs have an increased risk for spinal abnormalities and a new paper suggests that selection for screw tails may have led to a syndrome of abnormalities in both English and French Bulldogs. Every one who has bred dogs knows that focus on one characteristic, especially going for extremes, can lead to occurrence of unforeseen consequences. Nothing happens in isolation with breeding and selection. Congrats to the Swedes for this video and I hope it will encourage more judges to take an approach like this - regardless of whether or not they are under a requirement to do so. Because our activities really should be 'for the dogs' sake'.
  11. The VDH - Verband für das Deutsche Hundewesen (German Kennel Club in English) is the foremost organisation representing the interests of dog-owners throughout Germany – the first address to find out everything there is to know on the subject of life with dogs, on dog sports and on dog breeding. As an umbrella organisation for its 175 member clubs the VDH today represents more than 650,000 members. Website: http://www.vdh.de/en/home/ An overview of the VDH (in German) can be found at: http://www.vdh.de/ueber-den-vdh/wir-ueber-uns/. "The VDH is the leading advocacy of all dog owners in Germany - the primary authority on life with dogs, dog sports and dog breeds. As the umbrella organization for 175 member associations of the VDH today represents more than 650,000 members." This page contains links to 32 breeds whose standards are managed by VDH, VDH Staff and Committee's contacts, VDH Statutes & Regulations, the Organization Structure/composition, Registration Statistics for breeds from 2000-2014, a link to VDH History and a link to VDH's Annual Report. VDH Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction - Also see the: Rasselexikon (BREEDOPEDIA) - http://www.vdh.de/welpen/rasse A comprehensive online reference of 343 breeds including a detailed description of each breed which covers the general appearance, the character, the history and coat. Some breed profiles contain a video presentation (in German). In addition: the Breedopedia includes addresses of VDH member clubs and breeders with VDH-seal of approval. The breed listing is alphabetical and a specific breed search function is available.
  12. Suomen Kennelliitto (Finnish Kennel Club, in English) - Established in 1889, the Finnish Kennel Club is a nationwide expert organisation on canine matters. Its aim is to promote the breeding of pedigree dogs, support diverse dog-related activities and improve dog-keeping standards in Finland. FKC disseminates expert information and serves as a comprehensive lobbying organisation for Finnish and international dog activities. Website: https://www.kennelliitto.fi/en Finnish Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -
  13. The Norwegian Kennel Club (NKC) was founded in 1898, and is the largest organisation for dog owners in Norway. Website: https://www.nkk.no/english/category1045.html Norwegian Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -
  14. The 2017 International Dog Health Workshop in Paris was the culmination of my summer 2016 project entitled, "A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs." I'm very grateful to have attended this workshop that featured ways we can work collaboratively to improve dog health and welfare. My project poster was displayed among many other interesting research projects. I was impressed by the diversity of attendees including dog owners, veterinarians, kennel club members, researchers, and many more! The International Dog Health Workshop stands out to me among other conferences I've attended because it truly was a working meeting, rather than simply being presented in a lecture format. I left inspired to take action due to the creativity of my group and ideas generated during the meeting. Many thanks to the Behavior and Welfare theme facilitators, Dr. Patricia Olson and Ms. Caroline Kisko, and the group participants. The Behavior and Welfare theme was tasked to address early canine socialization and its influence on creating a suitable lifetime companion. We acknowledged that a more thorough literature search would be beneficial followed by research to address gaps we identify. Beyond research, our group also discussed the need for more positive marketing to the public to communicate the benefits of acquiring a well-socialized puppy. A special thanks to the Skippy Frank Fund for making this project and trip possible. Also many thanks to my personal French translator and mom-extraordinaire, Lindi Dreibelbis, for accompanying me on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. What wonderful memories we made together in Paris.
  15. Hello all! Brenda’s blog gave a great overview of the American Kennel Club National Parent Club Canine Health Conference we attended earlier this month in St. Louis, Missouri. I am grateful for the sponsorship from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals provided to myself and the 31 other veterinary students in attendance. This conference, like the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, was an opportunity to learn more about cutting edge research that is improving dog health. Topics were varied and included tick borne disease, epilepsy, lymphoma, and reproductive health. It was exciting to see my Colorado State University (CSU) Immunology professor, Dr. Anne Avery, present on her lymphoma research. Right: View from the top of the St. Louis Gateway Arch After completing a CSU clinical orthopedics rotation a few weeks prior to the conference, it was especially interesting to hear what I had learned about Omega-3 fatty acids in my rotation be reiterated by presenter Dr. Wendy Baltzer from Massey University. Her Purina funded study described that a diet high in Omega-3 fatty acids post-surgical correction of cranial cruciate ligament disease is helpful and results in less progression of arthritis and lameness. I’m am looking forward to graduation in 9 months and continued involvement in dog health. The opportunities I have received since first starting my IPFD project have been endless and I am very thankful for the DogWellNet.com community! Left: Veterinary Student Attendees at the AKC National Parent Club Health Conference
  16. National Kennel Clubs are major stakeholders in the governance and regulation of dog breeding. As such, they have been the targets of major criticism related to dog health issues. It is therefore interesting to investigate to what extent health and welfare is a priority for kennel clubs (KCs), and what are the capacities and actions implemented to deal with those issues. A survey was sent in 2017 to 40 KCs with 15 answers received from 11 European (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the UK) and 4 non-European countries (Australia, Mexico, Uruguay, and the USA) aimed at describing and comparing information across countries in dog breed health management (Wang et al. 2018). First, in order to determine the population of dogs under the responsibility of KC, the percentages of all dogs being registered as ‘pedigree’ dogs were estimated considering the 15 surveyed KCs, as well 35 other countries, using sources such as the FCI online statistics. Across countries, the average and median percentage of the entire dog population that were registered pedigree dogs, respectively was 20% and 14%. However, there was a large variation across countries, with European Nordic countries showing, in general, a larger proportion of pedigree dogs (see Figure 1). This aspect is of importance, since it is expected that the responsibility toward general dog health, as well as the capacity to improve the situation, relates to the proportion of dogs that are at least to some extent under the influence of the KCs. When asked about the current challenges, KCs ranked exaggerated morphological features and inherited disorders as the most important issues, showing those two problems are now clearly identified as priorities (Figure 2). By contrast, issues such as economic constraints to breeding were rarely viewed as problematic for dog breeding. Kennel clubs also commented on challenges related to the difficulty to find balance between increased regulation and the risk of losing members; to achieve consensus and compliance of breeders and clubs toward breed health strategies; as well as lack of capacity regarding information provision and education. Surveyed countries showed great diversity in terms of information management, implementation of breeding strategies, recommendations, requirement, restriction and tools. Most KCs indicated that information on genealogies, breed standards and dog shows were recorded in their data base for most, if not all breeds; however, health information (e.g. screening examinations, genetic tests) was more sparsely recorded and provided to the public, both for breeds within countries and across countries (Figure 3). For instance, KCs from Austria, Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, the UK and the USA provided health information status on pedigrees and in online data bases, but in general, not all breeds were covered. When considering implementation of breeding strategies, six countries indicated that there were no breeding strategies implemented by any breed clubs, while in three countries (Austria, Sweden and the Netherlands) it was reported that each breed club had its breeding strategy. Several countries indicated that they were planning to develop breeding tools and provide health information to users, and for instance, France and Belgium reported having ongoing work to develop tools to provide online pedigree with health information or estimate breeding values for complex disorders such as hip dysplasia. Although limited by the relatively low number of countries considered, this survey showed that despite large differences in their approach to breeding policies and management, the awareness to improve breeding and health of pedigree dogs was strong among the surveyed Kennel Clubs. The dog breeding world is increasingly global in scope. The understanding of both the diversity of health initiatives and the potential for coordinated actions internationally is key to further efforts to promote dog health and welfare. There is probably still a lot of progress to be made in term of information provision and collection, as well as planning breeding strategies considering dog health. In particular, finding a consensus in terms of constraints and priorities for breeding, is expected to be particularly challenging for Kennel Clubs and breed clubs in order to implement those strategies. Although the situations differ across countries, exchanges of experiences may surely help to find the most adequate solutions toward improvement of health and welfare. Reference: Wang, S., Laloë, D., Missant, F. M., Malm, S., Lewis, T., Verrier, E., ... & Leroy, G. (2018). Breeding policies and management of pedigree dogs in 15 national kennel clubs. The Veterinary Journal. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2018.02.018
  17. In Sweden each breed club must produce a breeding strategy and health profile. We are continuing to build a resource of documents in English. These files can also be reached via the Breed Database page (if an English summary exists for the breed). Members can access The Swedish RAS (English) documents via Downloads at: http://dogwellnet.com/files/category/8-swedish-breeding-strategy-ras-documents-english-summary/ PLEASE - REGISTER TO ACCESS THESE DOCUMENTS Swedish RAS English Summaries are available for the following breeds (list reviewed 4-15-2018) Barbet: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/354-barbet-swedish-ras-english-summary/· Soft Coated Wheaton Terrier: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/275-irish-soft-coated-wheaten-terrier-breeding-strategy-finnish-kennel-club/· Borzoi|Teeth placement: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/278-bsi-borzoi-canine-teeth-placement/ · Poodle: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/286-poodle-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Portuguese Podengo: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/303-portuguese-podengo-ras-english/ · ChowChow: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/305-chow-chow-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Pug: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/312-pug-ras-breeding-strategy-english-summary/ · Swedish Valhund: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/313-swedish-vallhund-ras/ · Australian Shepherd: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/315-australian-shepherd-swedish-ras-breeding-strategy/ · Borzoi: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/316-borzoi-ras-breeding-strategy-2016-english-summary/ · Norbottenspitz: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/329-norrbottenspitz-ras-breeding-strategy-2016-english/ · Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/338-cavalier-king-charles-spaniel-ras-dwn-english-summary/ · Clumber Spaniel: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/75-clumber-spaniel-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Collie (rough|smooth) https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/77-collie-rough-smooth-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · French Bulldog: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/78-french-bulldog-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Golden Retreiver: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/79-golden-retriever-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Pomeranian: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/80-pomeranian-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Boston Terrier: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/83-boston-terrier-swedish-ras-english-summary/ · Swedish Lapphund: https://dogwellnet.com/files/file/365-breed-specific-breeding-strategy-for-swedish-lapphund-english-summary/
  18. The Kennel Club is the largest organization in the UK devoted to dog health, welfare and training. Its objective is to ensure that dogs live healthy, happy lives with responsible owners. Website: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk See our partner resources article covering The Kennel Clubs E News; or to sign up go to: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/our-resources/kennel-club-newsletters/. Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -
  19. The French Kennel Club - SOCIÉTÉ CENTRALE CANINE (SCC) - was founded in 1881 as a non-profit organization by dog fanciers aiming to replenish native dog breeds and to bring in and establish foreign ones as well. The Société Centrale Canine became soon the reference canine organization, being recognized as a public interest organization by decree of the Council of State in April 1914. The SCC is proud to be one of the founders of the FCI in 1911, together with the Kennel Clubs from Germany, Austria, Belgium and the Netherlands. Website: https://www.centrale-canine.fr/ Follow this link for the French Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet
  20. June 2017 - the Nordic Kennel Union website debuts! - site content is available in English - For more than 60 years, the Nordic Kennel Union has been the unified voice of the Nordic countries in the dog world. NKU members share a passion for animal welfare and dog health which is reflected in common strategies to secure future generations of healthy and sound dogs through responsible and sustainable breeding. Health is one of the most important aspects of dog breeding and a central area for Nordic cooperation. NOTE from IPFD CEO Brenda Bonnett: Congratulations - and thank you - to all the NKU members - and especially our IPFD Partners the kennel clubs of Sweden, Finland and Norway. Individually these clubs are amazing in terms of the scope of their efforts and their historical and ongoing commitment to the health and welfare of dogs. Their willingness to share with individual dog breeders and other clubs - through DogWellNet.com and other venues - makes them great role models and leaders in the dog world. Visit the Nordic Kennel Union Website!
  21. Version 1.0.0

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    Using data from the Finnish Kennel Club (FKC) and from a screening program of the Finnish Dachshund Club, researchers from the University of Helsinki and the FKC provide evidence to support the use of radiographic screening for intervertebral disc calcification in Dachshunds and for adopting Estimated Breeding Values as a tool for selecting dogs for breeding.
  22. This exciting research paper is from a PhD project involving several of our IPFD Partners and collaborators. It is the first step towards being able to access the vast data sources of various kennel clubs and to combine data across countries. Published in the J Anim Breed Genet. 2017 Apr;134(2):152-161. doi: 10.1111/jbg.12242. Epub 2016 Nov 10. Merging pedigree databases to describe and compare mating practices and gene flow between pedigree dogs in France, Sweden and the UK S. Wang1,2,3, G. Leroy2,3, S. Malm4, T. Lewis5,6, E. Strandberg1 & W.F. Fikse1 1 Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden 2 Genetique Animale et Biologie Integrative, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 3 Genetique Animale et Biologie Integrative, Paris, INRA, Paris, France 4 Swedish Kennel Club, Spanga, Sweden 5 The Kennel Club, London, UK 6 School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Summary Merging pedigree databases across countries may improve the ability of kennel organizations to monitor genetic variability and health-related issues of pedigree dogs. We used data provided by the Societe Centrale Canine (France), Svenska Kennelklubben (Sweden) and the Kennel Club (UK) to study the feasibility of merging pedigree databases across countries and describe breeding practices and international gene flow within the following four breeds: Bullmastiff (BMA), English setter (ESE), Bernese mountain dog (BMD) and Labrador retriever (LBR). After merging the databases, genealogical parameters and founder contributions were calculated according to the birth period, breed and registration country of the dogs. Throughout the investigated period, mating between close relatives, measured as the proportion of inbred individuals (considering only two generations of pedigree), decreased or remained stable, with the exception of LBR in France. Gene flow between countries became more frequent, and the origins of populations within countries became more diverse over time. In conclusion, the potential to reduce inbreeding within purebred dog populations through exchanging breeding animals across countries was confirmed by an improved effective population size when merging populations from different countries. Wang_et_al-2016-Journal_of_Animal_Breeding_and_Genetics.pdf
  23. The SKK - Svenka Kennelklubben (Swedish Kennel Club, in English), is Sweden's largest organisation dedicated to dogs and dog owners. We represent the interests of our 300,000 members – first time dog owners, experienced breeders, hunters, dog lovers, puppy buyers, exhibitors, agility competitors and many more. Website: http://www.skk.se/en/ Follow this link for the SKK Blog at DogWellNet Follow this link for more information on the Swedish Kennel Club including our organizational structure, code of ethics, and more.
  24. The Irish Kennel Club promotes the responsible ownership and breeding of dogs throughout Ireland through education, registration, training and support schemes and events. Website: http://www.ikc.ie/ Irish Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -
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