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Found 10 results

  1. Ian Seath has again stimulated our 'little grey cells' and maybe even touched on some emotions, attitudes, and even deep-seated beliefs in his DOG-ED: SOCIAL ENTERPRISE post (23 June 2020): CULTURE EATS STRATEGY FOR BREAKFAST! Catchy title - firstly - where does that come from, and what does it mean? "Management Guru Peter Drucker famously stated that culture eats strategy for breakfast. So, What does "culture eats strategy" mean for you and your organization? In a very practical sense: No matter what business strategy or strategic plan you try to implement with your team, its success and efficacy are going to be held back by the people implementing the plan if the culture does not support it. " from: SME Strategy Management Consulting Ian's article draws on his extensive knowledge and background in business, strategy, and change management - as well as his fantastic dog expertise - to examine topical international information on COVID-19 and to draw comparisons with challenges in the dog world. He wants to encourage us to think about various aspects of health and welfare in dogs. Further moving his title discussion into the dog world: it means that if those needed to implement and drive change (in attitudes or practices) aren't passionate about the change or at least willing to embrace change or - even worse - if they deny the need for change at all (i.e. deny the existence of 'a problem') or are apathetic to the issues, then you stand no chance implementing a plan. Ultimately it is all about the people. Denial or apathy or resistance to change may occur if there is great passion for and attachment to an existing culture. In terms of the complex problems of the dog world, IPFD exists because it is clear that these issues have many stakeholders who bear responsibilities for the challenges and the solutions. And each of the stakeholder communities has their own culture - and that influences their views and actions and even willingness to collaborate. Ian goes on to describe bench-marking, i.e., ways to define, measure and characterize issues and actions on 3 levels. Let's further describe this relative to the dog world, and with a few possible examples: Metrics (statistics, measures) - tell you “what the performance is” or define and quantify aspects of the issue. E.g., prevalence and increased breed-specific risks of disease in various populations based on quantitative analysis vs. anecdote from personal experience (e.g. MY dogs are healthy!) Challenges: differences across regions, types of dogs, etc.; lack of consensus on how much is too much; perspectives of those who see dogs from different populations - e.g. veterinarians in practice vs. show judges. Lack of comprehensive, clear evidence fosters a reliance on culture-based interpretations...spin! Process (how the situation came to be, or what has influenced those levels): E.g. the influences of breeding practices (how diligently have breeders prioritized health and longevity). It must be noted that these processes have certainly been driven by culture. E.g., breeding for performance vs. for the conformation show ring vs. for companion dogs vs. for the trendy puppy trade E.g. health programs implemented by breed and kennel clubs (Ian gives some good examples) Challenges - the perception of the need for and time frame of change; and the amount of change; the acceptance of any authority over practices and processes from within or outside a community or culture. There is a tendency to look for simple solutions to complex problems - and then to be surprised that the outcome wasn't ideal. Culture tells you the story behind the processes...and that includes attitudes, tradition, beliefs, and habits...of the people involved. Those within a community (e.g. show world, veterinarians, the wider public) may share one culture...or there may be various cultures within a wider community. Culture can change. There are many cultures and communities in the dog world! From those who believe pedigreed dogs are the most important and breed standards are essentially inviolable; to those who feel there is room for evolution and flexibility, even within existing registries; to those who feel pedigreed dogs are not necessary. From those whose culture defines dogs as commodities or chattels; to those who accept dogs as sentient beings with some rights; to those who think they should be essentially be accorded human-level treatment. Challenges - all those attitudes impact what that community, culture, or group accepts as reasonable levels of welfare or disease or longevity. In fact, when cultural influences are strong, they may impact the willingness of those inside the culture to objectively view metrics, or to embrace processes and programs. And let's face it - a group or individual's attachment to their culture may be so strong, that they tend to view it not as one view, but the only acceptable view. 'Cultural norms' may be very different across communities. Rigidity is a major barrier to collaboration. Keys to moving forward Firstly, reflecting sincerely on how YOUR culture influences you, and then, if you want others to respect your culture Being aware of the differences across stakeholders - in their culture (attitudes, attachments, basic beliefs, approaches, etc.) wouldn't if be great if we could respect all views? but at least we must be aware of whether our disagreements are arising from different interpretation of the metrics and evidence OR from a different approach and process OR from the cultural sphere Taking the brave step outside cultural influences - embrace collaboration and collective actions while never assuming there is a one-size-fits-all solution. Leadership from various cultures and communities is needed. The ultimate question is - do we have common ground on which to advance? For IPFD, that would mean that even if we have slightly different definitions on the specifics, everyone comes to the table with a desire to enhance the health and welfare of dogs. Human aspects are critical as well - but there must be a balance.
  2. This article is a summary we (IPFD) have created describing the issues, the dialogue and challenges around regulatory actions in the Netherlands as of June 2020. The issue is having a polarizing effect across stakeholder groups, and it is our belief that the best results for all dogs are to be achieved by collaborative efforts. IPFD also promotes the considerations of impacts on dogs, breeds, and people when programs are put in place, given the complex nature of issues of health and welfare. This article is a compilation of resources for those who are exploring the situation. Table Of Contents Key points of the situation and background from 2019 Dutch Kennel Club - Breeding Criteria Documentation (English) Stakeholder Responses DogWellNet Coverage and Dog Health Workshops Resources Kennel Club Programs Questions & Moving Forward... (also a good summary of major issues) Some key points: The government of the Netherlands has created a set of criteria about the conformation of short-muzzled dogs and regulations that prohibit breeding of any dog when one is of these is exceeded, regardless of the other criteria. Although the regulations apply to all breeders, as for other issues, pedigree dog breeders who register puppies with the national kennel club (Raad van Beheer, Dutch Kennel Club, DKC) are the most visible and traceable and there is an emphasis on the DKC to enact and enforce these guidelines. And it does not restrict ownership of these dogs or purchase and importation of dogs. Controversies and challenges include: In the 12 designated breeds, pedigreed dog breeders account for a very small proportion of puppies of these breeds being sold in the Netherlands; most are from non-pedigreed breeders and imports. How will the legislation help the majority of dogs? The 12 breeds: i.e., • Affenpinscher • Boston Terrier • English Bulldog • French Bulldog • Griffon Belge • Griffon Bruxellois • Petit Brabançon • Japanese Spaniel • King Charles Spaniel • Pug • Pekingese • Shih Tzu - although sharing some similarities in facial conformation do not have similar risks for Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome, based on available statistics. As stated by the DKC in their response to the proposed legislation: The government's criteria restricting breeding describe exaggerated conformations, which DKC agrees are not desirable and the DKC has concurred with almost all criteria and is supportive in monitoring the breeding stock of pedigree dogs. (See table in Breeding strategy proposal Dutch KC, below). However, the DKC does not agree with the breeding-prohibiting criterion of the Craniofacial Ratio (CFR), stating that, “This criterion would make it impossible to breed certain breeds while the prognostic value and the reproducibility of the CFR are being questioned among scientists.” The scientific evidence for the use of the CFR in the way proposed by the government and their experts is not robust for the breeds studied or should at least be subjected to further review. The government criteria may overemphasize only one aspect of the problems in some of these breeds. Most of the 12 breeds were not part of the key cited study. The DKC is now under pressure from the government and welfare critics and members of the show world for meeting government demands. The situation is being hotly debated through much of the pedigreed dog world and beyond, with some expressing the concern that this regulatory approach is defined in a way to eventually eliminate these breeds and may lead to further restrictions for other breeds. Unfortunately, there are some voices dismissing compelling evidence that there are health problems in certain breeds. It may be that groups who support, in general, attention to the health and welfare of brachychephalics, and have spoken in support of the legislation, may not have carefully considered the evidence or wider impacts. Some are worried that other counties may follow the lead of the Netherlands, without careful consideration. Background: Health and welfare management of brachycephalic dogs is the issue; there are implications are for all dogs and owners. The health and welfare of brachycephalic dogs is a highly complex situation - and yet current reactions and efforts tend to be rather narrow. Positions on various sides seem to becoming entrenched. When narrow or unilateral solutions are enacted without adequate participation of all stakeholders, conflict rather than collaboration or collective actions is often the result. The intensity in published statements and discussions online these days, sometimes extending to hostility, will not lead to an improvement in relations and certainly not to an improvement for the health and welfare of dogs. Responsibility lies with all stakeholders. Simple solutions to complex problems are unlikely to be effective and generally produce unintended consequences. For background and commentary on the recent situation in the Netherlands, please see Dr. Brenda Bonnett's Blog from August 2019, where concerns are expressed that the proposed legislation in the Netherlands was not likely to achieve its goals and the balanced report of the Dutch Kennel Club was presented: Brachycephalic dogs in the Netherlands Since then, the government of the Netherlands has enacted its regulations, to address what they consider to be a pressing need to protect the health and welfare of brachycephalic dogs. Unfortunately, the proposed solutions do not seem to have taken into account the full scientific evidence about the problems nor possible solutions; they may not tackle the full range of concerns; and the focus/enforcement on pedigree breeders may not achieve population-wide benefits for the majority of dogs. While these regulations are under the mandate of one country's government, there is the potential for more harm than good to come from these efforts, with broad implications for owners, dogs, and breeders, both within and beyond the Netherlands. Raad van Beheer (The Dutch Kennel Club, DKC) has translated information on the background and particulars of government regulations regarding breeding brachycephalic dogs - effective in the Netherlands as of May 18, 2020. Links to extensive coverage of the issues are located on the Fokken met kortsnuitige honden page on Raad van Beheer's website. Links to the eight documents that are are available in English (accessed June 2020) are listed below. Below are compiled resources on the 'discussions' and issues as well as resources, including those calling for inclusive and collaborative discussions. This resource page will be updated as the situation evolves. ...
  3. Dave St. Louis

    Breeds

    Here you will find an overview of breed resources on DogWellNet.com. This is not a comprehensive listing - it is a starting point for finding relevant resources. Please visit the various areas of the site using the purple navigation bar and/or the Search function.
  4. For many years, Agria Animal Insurance, Sweden (Agria Djurförsäkring, Stockholm, Sweden) has supported veterinary research and provided statistics on diagnoses for health and life claims to Swedish breed clubs. Since 1995, Agria has collaborated with and funded researchers, from universities in Sweden and other countries, to produce over 35 scientific publications on descriptive and analytical research from their database. Since 2002, continuing their devotion to the health and well-being of dogs and their ongoing cooperation with the Swedish Kennel Club, Agria has produced information on both health care and life insurance claims in a format requested by and developed in consultation with breed clubs. The data and analysis are similar to those used in numerous refereed scientific publications. Initially, information from 1995-2002 was compiled on 80 breeds and Mixed Breeds on 11 CDs (see the Agria Dog Breed Profiles ). The CDs were given free to those breed clubs and remaining copies are available to the public. Subsequently, the material has been developed into an even more accessible form - the Updates. These are given to Swedish breed clubs, and the information is incorporated into various health programs. CONTENT UPDATED: 9-13-2019 Updates (2006-2011) for 122 breeds are available in our Downloads or links through our Pedigreed Dogs database (access is restricted to Advanced Members and IPFD Partners). Updates (2011-2016) for 188 breeds are also available in our Downloads. Read the first few pages of the 2011-2016 breed profile documents for information on the sources and methods utilized for calculations represented in the presented data. Links to the 2011-2016 Agria breed profiles will be added to the Pedigreed dogs database. You can view a list of breeds and available insurance data here: Agria breed profiles - 2006-2011 and 2011-2016 - DogWellNet.pdf Click the following link for an overview of the Agria Updated Dog Breed Statistics from 2006-2011 (Description; Background Information and Hints on Interpretation): Description and Background to the Agria Updated Dog Breed Statistics 2006-2011.pdf. This information is also included in the downloadable file for each breed. Download an FAQ document for the Agria Dog Breed Statistics here: Agria Dog Breed Statistics FAQs.pdf a.m. 9-13-2019 - PLEASE NOTE: the 2011-2016 Agria breed profile file links shown in the table below are currently available only by special permission. Stay tuned for further details regarding access! Or make a request to info@ipfdogs.com. Breed Name 2006 – 2011 (122 breeds) 2011-2016 (188 breeds) Affenpinscher: 2011-2016 Afghan Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Airdale Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Akita: 2011-2016 Alaskan Husky: 2011-2016 Alaskan Malamute: 2011-2016 American Akita: 2011-2016 American Bulldogg: 2011-2016 American Cocker Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 American Staffordshire Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Cattledog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Kelpie: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Shepherd: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Terrier: 2011-2016 Basenji: 2011-2016 Basset Artésien Normand: 2011-2016 Basset Fauve De Bretagne: 2011-2016 Basset Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Beagle: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bearded Collie: 2011-2016 Beauceron: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bedlington Terrier: 2011-2016 Bernese Mountain Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bichon Frise: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bichon Havanais: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bolognese: 2011-2016 Border Collie: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Border Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Borzoi: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Boston Terrier: 2011-2016 Bouvier des Flandres: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Boxer: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Briard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Brittany Dog: 2011-2016 Bull Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bullmastiff: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cairn Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cane Corso: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cardigan & Pembroke Welsh Corgi: 2011-2016 Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Chihuahua: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Chinese Crested: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Chow Chow: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cocker Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Collie Rough: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Collie Smooth: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Coton de Tuléar: 2011-2016 Curly Coated Retriever: 2011-2016 Dachshunds Miniature: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dachshunds Standard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dalmatian: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Danish-Swedish Farmdog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dobermann: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dogo Argentino: 2011-2016 Douge de Bordeaux: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Drever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dutch Shepherds: 2011-2016 East Siberian Laika: 2006-2011 2011-2016 English Bulldog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 English Pointer: 2011-2016 English Setter: 2006-2011 2011-2016 English Springer Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Eurasian: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Finnish Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Finnish Lapphund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Finnish Spitz: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Flat Coated Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Fox Terriers: 2006-2011 2011-2016 French Bulldog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 German Hunting Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 German Pointers: 2006-2011-long haired, 2006-2011-short haired, 2006-2011-wire haired 2011-2016 German Shepherd Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 German Spitz Klein: 2011-2016 German Spitz Mittel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Golden Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Gordon Setter: 2011-2016 Great Dane: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Great Pyrenees: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Greater Swiss Mountain Dog: 2011-2016 Greyhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Griffons: 2011-2016 Groenendael: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Halleforshund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Hamilton Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Hovawart: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Hungarian Vizsla Shorthair: 2011-2016 Icelandic Sheepdog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Irish Red Setter: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Irish Terrier: 2011-2016 Irish Wolfhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Italian Greyhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Jack Russell Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Japanese Chin: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Japanese Spitz: 2011-2016 Karelian Bear Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Keeshond: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Kerry Blue Terrier: 2011-2016 King Charles Spaniel: 2011-2016 Kooiker Hound: 2011-2016 Kromfohrländer: 2011-2016 Kuvasz: 2011-2016 Labrador Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Lagotto Romagnolo: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Lakeland Terrier: 2011-2016 Lancashire Heeler: 2011-2016 Landseer: 2011-2016 Lapponian Herder: 2011-2016 Leonberger: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Lhasa Apso: 2011-2016 Löwchen: 2011-2016 Malinois: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Maltese: 2011-2016 Mastiff: 2011-2016 Miniature Bull Terrier: 2011-2016 Miniature Pinscher: 2011-2016 Mixed Breed: 2011-2016 Münsterländer Small: 2011-2016 Newfoundland: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norfolk terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norrbottenspitz: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norwegian Buhund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norwegian Elkhound Grey: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norwegian Lundehund: 2011-2016 Norwich Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Old English Sheepdog: 2011-2016 Papillon: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Parson Russell Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Pekingese: 2011-2016 Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Phalene: 2011-2016 Pinscher: 2011-2016 Plott: 2011-2016 Polish Lowland Sheepdog: 2011-2016 Pomeranian: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Poodle Miniature: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Poodle Standard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Poodle Toy: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Portuguese Water Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Pug: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Puli: 2011-2016 Pumi: 2011-2016 Pyrenean Sheepdog: 2011-2016 Rhodesian Ridgeback: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Rottweiler: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Russian Toy: 2011-2016 Salukis: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Samoyed: 2011-2016 Schapendoes: 2011-2016 Schiller Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Schipperke: 2011-2016 Schnauzers Giant: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Schnauzers Miniature: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Schnauzers Standard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Scottish Deerhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Scottish Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Shar Pei: 2011-2016 Shetland Sheepdog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Shiba: 2011-2016 Shih Tzu: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Siberian Husky: 2011-2016 Slovensky Kopov: 2011-2016 Smålands Hound: 2011-2016 Small Brabant Griffon: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Spanish Water Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 St Bernhard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Stabyhoun: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Staffordshire Bull Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish Elkhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish Lapphund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish Vallhund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish White Elkhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swiss Hounds: 2011-2016 Tervueren: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Tibetan Mastiff: 2011-2016 Tibetan Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Tibetan Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Volpino Italiano: 2011-2016 Wachtelhund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Weimaraner: 2011-2016 Welsh Springer Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Welsh Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 West Highland White Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 West Siberian Laika: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Whippet: 2011-2016 White Swiss Shepherd Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Yorkshire Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016
  5. 29 June 2019 |VET RECORD - Volume 184, Issue 26 Improving the health of pedigree dogs By Suzanne Jarvis "A RANGE of actions are needed to improve the health of pedigree dogs, and multiple stakeholders must be engaged for progress to be made.That was the outcome from the fourth International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW), held earlier this month and hosted by the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) and The Kennel Club in the UK."
  6. Why did cross breeding become taboo in the world of pedigree dogs? Author, Ingemar Borelius discusses the history of the purebred dog - breed standards, breeding between varieties of breeds, effects of the reduction in heterozygosity/narrowing gene pools and current efforts and measures taken to sustain genetic diversity in breeds with the aim of addressing health and welfare issues. Specific breeds mentioned in this writing are the Retrievers and several others (Spaniels, Lundehund, German pinscher, Kromfohrländer...) . Article-Ingemar Borelius -- Why did crossbreeding become taboo -PDF-
  7. "In Brief The domestic dog is divided into hundreds of island-like populations called breeds. Parker et al. examine 161 breeds and show that they were developed through division and admixture. The analyses define clades, estimate admixture dates, distinguish geographically diverse populations, and help determine the source of shared mutations among diverse populations."
  8. IPFD DWN Editor2

    Breeding

    Most national kennel clubs and cynological organisations have regulations, recommendations and/or guidelines outlining the important ethical principles and strategies that should be followed when breeding pedigreed dogs. Although there are many similarities in content, there are also differences in scope, focus, intent and other issues. Note: Breed-specific recommendations are covered under that section of DogWellNet.com. Many governments, countries, states and local authorities, as well as humane and commercial organisations have developed general guidelines and/or regulations addressing health and welfare issues in the breeding of dogs (pedigreed and other) that are intended for sale. Obviously, there will be overlap with the population addressed by the kennel club guidelines, but the focus and scope are generally somewhat different. Guidelines focused on commercial dog breeding are in the Legislation section.
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