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Found 6 results

  1. Purdue University News - Press release - Your dog might be hiding its true colors From the Press release... " New research from Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine shows that some breeds of dogs have hidden coat colors – and in some cases, other traits – that have been lurking all along. Example: There are around 18 recognized breeds of dogs that have the genetic potential to be born without a tail – such as the popular Australian Shepherd (shown in photo). But the data shows that up to 48 of the breeds analyzed possess the tailless gene variant, usually at a very low frequency." Wisdom Health - Press release - First-of-its-kind study reveals genetic traits determining coat colors and physical appearance in over 200 dog breeds November 2019 From the Press release... "As our study demonstrates, purebred dogs have so much more than meets the eye - literally. The information provided by a WISDOM PANEL dog DNA test can help us better understand the hidden elements of dog genetics," said Dr. Angela Hughes DVM PhD, veterinarian and canine genetics expert at Wisdom Health. "While our study focused primarily on purebred populations, these hidden traits can also have ramifications for mixed breed dogs. When unexpected or hidden traits are passed to mixed breed dogs from their purebred ancestors, it further complicates the already difficult task of visual breed identification making DNA tests the only reliable method of determining breed ancestry." Read the study... True Colors: Commercially-acquired morphological genotypes reveal hidden allele variation among dog breeds, informing both trait ancestry and breed potential Comment: Extracted content of interest to dog breeders & breed managers... See S3 Table. Unfavorable or “fault” phenotypes possible by breed and breed registry. "Breeds genotyped to have alleles that would produce phenotypes considered as a “fault” by either the American Kennel Club (AKC), Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), United Kennel Club (UKC), or The Kennel Club of the UK (KC). The level of tolerance within each breed registry is designated as either not allowed (N), not preferred (n.p.), allowed (Y), or ambiguously worded (amb.). A breed not recognized by a given organization is indicated with a dash (-). Inheritance of the fault-causing allele is designated as dominant (D), recessive (R), or compound heterozygote (CH). Breed name abbreviations are as listed in S1 Table. Probabilities for producing the non-standard phenotype were calculated assuming random mating within the breed, and account for multi-gene inheritance, expression, and epistatic effects." https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0223995.s005 " Much recent emphasis has been placed on the importance of genetic diversity within breeds [69–76]. With the conservation of diversity in mind, breeders and breed organizations must weigh the relative value of breed standard conformity with preservation of genetic diversity. The existence of unfavorable, though arguably benign pigmentation or morphological variations, has here been quantified and can be addressed by applied genetic screening to reduce the carrier frequency of breeding stock, or by reassessing breed standards to broaden the acceptance of preexisting variation. Likewise, though our analyses have indicated that production of disallowed phenotypes is generally quite low, the occurrence of an undesirable pigmentation trait should not necessarily exclude a dog from purebred status if that variant has been detected in the appropriate population. As a recent example, effective 1 January 2019, the Great Dane Club of America revised their breed standard to allow merle coloring on a black base. Canine genetic research has clarified that the presence of the merle allele is required for the Harlequin phenotype [14]; since this relationship was previously unclear, the breed had not allowed merle (without the Harlequin modifier) until this change. These revisions demonstrate the purebred dog community recognizing and willingly implementing the findings from canine genetic research. The present work will guide similar decision-making by breed clubs regarding definition of acceptable breed colors. "
  2. Bernese Mountain Dogs were originally found in the valleys of the Bernese Oberland of Switzerland and were used as general multi purpose farm dogs. They were draught dogs pulling cart loaded with produce to market, items such as basket ware, cheese, or milk to the local dairy. The carts were also decorated for village festivals and celebrations which still puts the dogs as centre of attention today. They were also employed in helping to herd sheep and cattle to and from the mountain pastures. All Bernese carry the traditional Swiss colouring of black and tan with white markings.
  3. In this section we link to ongoing research projects of interest and relevance to dog breeding. These may relate to specific conditions, e.g. inherited conditions, or which focus on innovative approaches or population studies. In addition, we will link to research institutes and profile partnerships between researchers and breed clubs. Eventually, we hope to describe models of research partnerships and help connect dog breeders and researchers.
  4. The questionnaire used is a safe, easy to deploy and time-efficient tool to reliably assess certain owner-directed aggressive tendencies of family dogs. Assessment of owner-directed aggressive behavioural tendencies of dogs in situations of possession and manipulation (PDF) Web page article at: http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/4/10/171040 Authors: Anna Bálint, Gabriella Rieger, Ádám Miklósi, Péter Pongrácz Published 18 October 2017.DOI: 10.1098/rsos.171040
  5. Providing a platform to initiate and support conversation and exchange of health and welfare information among stakeholders in purebred breeds is part of IPFD's mission. Saluki Health Co-ordinators internationally are invited to share information and exchange ideas to benefit the breed. If your passion is Saluki health we hope you will Join DogWellNet as a Saluki Breed Expert. At present there is no global Saluki organisation - the great work being done for the breed is primarily nationally based and in some countries there are multiple clubs for the breed. Small population breed advocates can face challenges in identifying and discussing management of key health issues. The Saluki or Gazelle Hound Club UK's David Steel has proposed the idea of taking a globally based approach to addressing Saluki Health. Many thanks to David for sharing a few thoughts on how to broker and define collective action to benefit the Saluki breed.
  6. Version 1.0.0

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    The Genetics of the Dog, 2nd Edition Edited by Elaine A. Ostrander National Human Genome Research Institute National Institutes of Health Maryland USA and Anatoly Ruvinsky University of New England Australia
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