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Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 34 results

  1. Ann Milligan

    Cambridge Puppy Nostril Study

    Cambridge University is carrying out an important research project into the development of the nostrils in brachycephalic (short-faced) dog breeds. The breeds in this study are French Bulldogs, English Bulldogs and Pugs.
  2. Aimee Llewellyn-Zaidi

    Research - Long-term impact of DNA tests on dog diseases

    2019 Lewis TW, Mellersh CS. Changes in mutation frequency of eight Mendelian inherited disorders in eight pedigree dog populations following introduction of a commercial DNA test. Plos One, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209864 DNA Testing - General Subject: DNA Testing Type: Research Journal/Source: peer-reviewed research publication Authors/Researchers: University, Kennel Club (IPFD Partners); HGTD Participants Recommended For: Veterinarians, Owners/Breeders This study is one of the very few to investigate the impact of DNA testing on changing a dog population's disease risk. The research looked at determining changes in frequency of disease causing mutations (how common a mutant gene is in a population) as a result of breeding-pair selection based on DNA test results. The results indicated that there has been an overall decline in disease causing mutations in the 8 diseases in 8 breeds investigated. While the paper recognises that there can be variations in how quickly a disease is reduced or eliminated (such as breed population size), it concluded that where dog breeders appear to incorporate DNA test results as part of breeding plans, there is success in decreasing the frequency of mutation. The study looked at: prcd-PRA in Labrador Retriever and Cocker Spaniel, HC in Staffordshire Bull Terriers, EIC in Labrador Retriever, PLL in Mini-Bull Terrier, EF and DE/CC in Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, PRA rcd-4 in Gordon, and Irish Setter, and spinocerebellar ataxia in Parson Russell Terrier. Within the UK at least, this represents a spectrum of large and small breeds, and generally "known" diseases within the breeds. 2019 Lewis TW, Mellersh CS. Changes in mutation frequency of eight Mendelian inherited disorders in eight pedigree dog populations following introduction of a commercial DNA test. Plos One, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209864 See also: Nearly 20 Years of DNA Testing – What Can We Learn? : IPFD CEO's blog post with discussion of wider implications of the study's approach and findings; based on Ian Seath's commentary (Dog-ED: Social Enterprise) with a breeder/health council perspective on the article above. IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing (HGTD) and search on the mentioned diseases for more information on the the condition, phenes, tests and more.
  3. The Kennel Club recognizes DNA tests and schemes in conjunction with breed clubs and laboratories, some of which are recorded by the Kennel Club on the registration database and are available to view via the online tool Health Test Results Finder.
  4. News & Highlights Expertise, inspiration and insight... Breed education at its finest! Helpful Hint Make a Donation Stay Informed!
  5. Abstract Undesirable behaviours (UBs) are common in dogs and can jeopardise animal and human health, leading to dog abandonment and euthanasia. Dogs exhibiting UBs may have compromised welfare from underlying emotional motivations for the behaviour (eg anxiety) or from the methods used by owners to resolve the problem (eg aversive techniques). The objective of this study was to estimate proportional mortality due to UBs and risk factors for death due to UBs, including death from road traffic accidents, in dogs under three years of age attending primary-care veterinary practices in England from 2009‐2014. Cases were identified by searching de-identified electronic patient records from primary-care veterinary practices participating in the VetCompass Programme. The findings highlight that dogs under three years of age are at a proportionately high risk of death due to UBs (33.7%) compared with other specific causes of death (eg gastrointestinal issues: 14.5%). Male dogs had 1.40× the odds of death from UB compared with females. The proportional mortality from UB for male dogs where information on the cause of death was available was 0.41. Neutered dogs had 1.94× the odds of death due to a UB compared with entire dogs. Aggression was the most prevalent UB overall. Veterinarians had recommended referral in 10.3% of cases where dogs died due to exhibiting a UB and had dispensed nutraceutical, pheromone or pharmacological treatment to 3.0% of the UB cases that died. This study shows that undesirable behaviours require better preventive measures and treatment, through further research and education of veterinarians, other professionals within the dog industry and owners.
  6. Harmonised welfare legislation is needed... Author: Dr Jennifer Maher, University of South Wales writes... "Dogs are the most popular companion animal in the UK; for many they offer companionship and support and a special emotional bond. For others, however, dogs are a lucrative source of income. Evidence from key national and international animal welfare non-government organisations [NGO] (PDSA 2016; Dogs Trust 2014, 2015; Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals [RSPCA] 2016a, b; International Fund for Animal Welfare [IFAW] 2012; Four Paws International 2013) supports stakeholder (such as the British Veterinarians Association [BVA] 2014) concerns that illegal and irresponsible puppy breeding and trade is escalating. Central to these concerns are the large-scale industrial and international commercial breeders now characteristic of the breeding industry: effectively a sea-change in UK puppy trade. Since the introduction of PETS (2012), which relaxed the requirements for importing companion animals to the UK, the commercial and non-commercial movement and trade of companion animals from Europe has increased significantly (Dogs Trust 2014). Simultaneously, stakeholders have identified UK-bred puppies coming from large-scale legal and illegal breeding establishments." http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/11/1736/347312 Consumer Education... The Kennel Club -- Puppy Awareness Week 1-7 September 2018
  7. This publication succinctly addresses: | Health and welfare issues associated with brachycephaly | | Societal responsibility | | Driving healthy standards | | Breed Standards | | Breed health and conservation plans | | Brachycephalic health assessments | | Marketing and advertising | | The role of the veterinary professions | | 10-point plan for veterinary practices | | Research | BVA Position Brachycephalic Dogs - January 2018 BVA-position-brachycephalic-dogs-Jan-2018 (Internal) Introduction "In the ten years to 2017 there has been a rapid rise in ownership and number of brachycephalic dogs in the UK (both those that are Kennel Club-registered and in the wider dog population1). According to Kennel Club figures, registration of these breed types has risen dramatically of the past ten years, with a 3104% increase in French Bulldog registrations, a 193% increase in Pug registrations and a 96% increase in Bulldog registrations.2 BVA is concerned that this rise in numbers is leading to a population-based increase of ill health and compromised welfare in these breed types. Figure 1 visually illustrates the rise in proportional annual birth rates amongst some brachycephalic breed types over the 2004-2016 period."
  8. Canine Genetics and Epidemiology (2018) O'Neill, D G and Baral, L and Church, D B and Brodbelt, D C and Packer, R M A (2018) Demography and disorders of the French Bulldog population under primary veterinary care in the UK in 2013. Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, 5 (3).
  9. Continuing our series on The Brachycephalic Issue: An exciting research project is underway at Queen’s Veterinary School Hospital, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge spearheaded by a stellar team of researchers : Jane Ladlow, MA VetMB CertSAS CertVR DipECVS MRCVS; Dr David Sargan, MA PhD; Dr Vicki Adams, DVM MSc PhD MRCVS; and Nai-Chieh Liu DVM MPhil into the Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS). In their flyer, Non-invasive Respiratory Function Assessment in Brachycephalic Dogs, they describe the study and call for participants in the UK. (internal link flyer -- BOAS flyers version 4 .pdf) This group has also published their findings in French Bulldogs. See: The Brachycephalic Issue: Evidence and Efforts: Characterisation of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome in French Bulldogs Using Whole-Body Barometric Plethysmography
  10. Many national kennel clubs, other cynological organizations (e.g. breed clubs) have developed guidelines, approaches or programs to: describe and evaluate the health of specific breeds outline guidelines or regulations for screening tests or other assessments on potential breeding dogs raise awareness about issues in a given breed. These programs take different forms in different countries. In this section we will provide information on various approaches and programs and direct you to online resources. For general guidelines (not breed-specific) see also: country-specific General Breeding and Ethical Guidelines. Countries: Austria: Austrian Kennel Club - Response to Animal Welfare Legislation The Austrian Kennel Club ( Österreichische Kynologenverband - ÖKV ) initiated a project, "Konterqual", to address legislative concerns. Sharing work like this can help to inform other kennel clubs and countries dealing with similar issues. In addition to presenting the facts and outcomes, it is so helpful to be able to see the process, to follow what steps were taken. Personal experiences, what works, what doesn't ... all these help others. We look forward to further information from Austria on developments and outcomes of this program. Nordic Kennel Union: The Nordic Kennel Union is a cooperative organisation for the Kennel Clubs of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland. Below we list efforts made to address exaggerations in breeds through the NKU country's BSI. There are six basic criteria defining if a breed should be listed as a high profile breed. Breeds which fulfill these and are thus listed are particularly paid attention to at dog show judging by the judge. Sweden: Svenska Kennelklubben (The Swedish Kennel Club) Breed-Specific Breeding Strategy Program For Judges see: Breed Specific Instructions Initiative for Judges Special Breed Specific Instructions (BSI) regarding exaggerations in pedigree dogs: A health protective project initiated by the Swedish Kennel Club. Breed Specific Strategies BSI - Presentation DHW, Dortmund Germany - Göran Bodegård SKK "The BSI program has been routinely applied in Sweden from 2009 – and at present generated more than ten thousand reports. From 2012 the program is embraced and worked through by all the Nordic countries and the latest edition ( NKU BSI 2014) is founded on the compound experience in the Nordic countries regarding the identification of areas of risk in a selected number of high profile breeds during the last decade. The structure of the NKU BSI is thus actually an inventory which allows for a continuous follow up and dynamic revisions of the BSI." SKK Genetic Programmes "Genetic health programmes are one of the tools used by the SKK (the Swedish Kennel Club) to manage hereditary disease. The SKK implemented the use of screening programmes to improve health in Swedish dogs more than 30 years ago. The first programmes concerned hip dysplasia and hereditary eye diseases. More recently, programmes for other heritable conditions, such as elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation and heart disease have been developed. Health programmes are based on breed-specific needs and have been introduced on request from and in consultation with the breed clubs." Finland: Breed Specific Instructions (BSI): Finland 2015 The Finnish Kennel Club has published new Breed-Specific Instructions for dog show judges. The instructions were drafted with the purpose of steering dog show judges to pay closer attention to exaggerated breed types. The new instructions entered into force on 1 June 2015. The Finnish Kennel Club's breeding strategy applies to all breeds. It outlines the main principles and objectives in breeding, and aims to improve genetic health of dogs. Find out what the breeding strategy means in your breed Finnish Kennel Club: General Breeding Strategy The UK: The Kennel Club What the Kennel Club does for Dog Health The report encompasses much of the work undertaken in recent years and includes detailed sections on: How The Kennel Club promotes health through education Initiatives designed to improve health awareness in dog shows How The Kennel Club promotes and progresses scientific research How The Kennel Club encourages responsible breeding of healthy dogs. Breed Watch The info graphic below provides information. Also see: High Profile Breeds Veterinary Health Checks for Best of Breed winners. BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS September 2016 News -- What is the new project at The Kennel Club? Breed Health & Conservation Plan -- The Kennel Club To learn more about the Breed Health and Conservation Project see... BHCP PDF.pdf Kennel Club Launching Breed Health And Conservation Plans The Kennel Club is launching its Breed Health and Conservation Plans project, a dynamic new resource to support breed clubs and individual breeders. This exciting new project will use evidence-based criteria to help identify common breed specific health concerns. Breeders will be provided with information and breeding resources to help them improve the health of their puppies and breed. We at DWN look forward to learning more about the good work done by Dr. Katy Evans and Bonnie Wiles and the UK Breed Clubs! "Breed Health Co-ordinators are individuals working on behalf of breed clubs and councils who are advocates for the health and welfare of their chosen breed." If you have a health related questions concerning a particular breed, we recommend contacting the Breed Health Co-ordinator through the your local Breed club, a list of which is available via the "Find a dog club" link on the Kennel Club's Breed Information Centre. TOOLKITS FOR BREED HEALTH COORDINATORS Website Content Toolkit Website Enhancement Toolkit BREED HEALTH IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE
  11. This document will serve as a compilation of different antimicrobial use resources from different countries around the world. This list is not exhaustive, and the purpose is to include a samples of guidelines from countries of both the first and third world origin. Countries are sorted alphabetically. We hope to keep developing this resource and welcome suggestions and submissions.
  12. Ann Milligan

    Bearded Collie

  13. Conclusions: Patellar luxation warrants inclusion as a welfare priority in dogs and control strategies that include this disorder should be considered as worthwhile breeding goals, especially in predisposed breeds.
  14. Canine Genetics and Epidemiology Demography and disorders of German Shepherd Dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK Dan G. O’Neill, Noel R. Coulson, David B. Church and Dave C. Brodbelt Canine Genetics and Epidemiology 2017, 4:7 | Published on: 28 July 2017 Conclusions
  15. Epidemiological associations between brachycephaly and upper respiratory tract disorders in dogs attending veterinary practices in England https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s40575-015-0023-8?site=cgejournal.biomedcentral.com Conclusions
  16. "It is recognised that, as in society at large, there are different attitudes towards different animal uses amongst veterinary professionals. It will be necessary to build consensus based on effective consultation and democratic decision-making, utilising a shared working definition of animal welfare and widespread recognition of the veterinary profession as an animal welfare-focused profession. This strategy lays out these principles, developed through consultation."
  17. This exciting research paper is from a PhD project involving several of our IPFD Partners and collaborators. It is the first step towards being able to access the vast data sources of various kennel clubs and to combine data across countries. Published in the J Anim Breed Genet. 2017 Apr;134(2):152-161. doi: 10.1111/jbg.12242. Epub 2016 Nov 10. Merging pedigree databases to describe and compare mating practices and gene flow between pedigree dogs in France, Sweden and the UK S. Wang1,2,3, G. Leroy2,3, S. Malm4, T. Lewis5,6, E. Strandberg1 & W.F. Fikse1 1 Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden 2 Genetique Animale et Biologie Integrative, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 3 Genetique Animale et Biologie Integrative, Paris, INRA, Paris, France 4 Swedish Kennel Club, Spanga, Sweden 5 The Kennel Club, London, UK 6 School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK Summary Merging pedigree databases across countries may improve the ability of kennel organizations to monitor genetic variability and health-related issues of pedigree dogs. We used data provided by the Societe Centrale Canine (France), Svenska Kennelklubben (Sweden) and the Kennel Club (UK) to study the feasibility of merging pedigree databases across countries and describe breeding practices and international gene flow within the following four breeds: Bullmastiff (BMA), English setter (ESE), Bernese mountain dog (BMD) and Labrador retriever (LBR). After merging the databases, genealogical parameters and founder contributions were calculated according to the birth period, breed and registration country of the dogs. Throughout the investigated period, mating between close relatives, measured as the proportion of inbred individuals (considering only two generations of pedigree), decreased or remained stable, with the exception of LBR in France. Gene flow between countries became more frequent, and the origins of populations within countries became more diverse over time. In conclusion, the potential to reduce inbreeding within purebred dog populations through exchanging breeding animals across countries was confirmed by an improved effective population size when merging populations from different countries. Wang_et_al-2016-Journal_of_Animal_Breeding_and_Genetics.pdf
  18. "Responsible breeders will consider the health of their puppies to be a priority, increasing the probability that healthy puppies will go on to live long and happy lives. This page includes sections on factors to consider when breeding dogs for health, including breeding from DNA tested dogs and inbreeding." The Kennel Club Advice and Information for Breeders
  19. The Kennel Club list of DNA tests available for each breed along with an indication as to whether the test is part of the Assured Breeder Scheme (recommended or required) and whether it is recorded on the Kennel Club registration database: Find your Breed's testing here. Also see the KC's DNA screening schemes and results page for breeds which currently have DNA tests recorded and published by the KC, together with further information on the specific conditions, lists of laboratories and results: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/health/breeding-for-health/dna-screening-schemes-and-results/. Also see The Kennel Club's list of Worldwide DNA Tests.
  20. " Once you've chosen which breed of puppy will best suit you - how do you find a reputable breeder? In this video, Kennel Club puppy buying expert Bill Lambert accompanies our young family on a visit to a KC approved breeder, to explain what questions to ask and what to look out for - and give details of the Kennel Club's Accredited Breeder's Scheme."
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