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Found 6 results

  1. For many years, Agria Animal Insurance, Sweden (Agria Djurförsäkring, Stockholm, Sweden) has supported veterinary research and provided statistics on diagnoses for health and life claims to Swedish breed clubs. Since 1995, Agria has collaborated with and funded researchers, from universities in Sweden and other countries, to produce over 35 scientific publications on descriptive and analytical research from their database. Since 2002, continuing their devotion to the health and well-being of dogs and their ongoing cooperation with the Swedish Kennel Club, Agria has produced information on both health care and life insurance claims in a format requested by and developed in consultation with breed clubs. The data and analysis are similar to those used in numerous refereed scientific publications. Initially, information from 1995-2002 was compiled on 80 breeds and Mixed Breeds on 11 CDs (see the Agria Dog Breed Profiles ). The CDs were given free to those breed clubs and remaining copies are available to the public. Subsequently, the material has been developed into an even more accessible form - the Updates. These are given to Swedish breed clubs, and the information is incorporated into various health programs. CONTENT UPDATED: 9-13-2019 Updates (2006-2011) for 122 breeds are available in our Downloads or links through our Pedigreed Dogs database (access is restricted to Advanced Members and IPFD Partners). Updates (2011-2016) for 188 breeds are also available in our Downloads. Read the first few pages of the 2011-2016 breed profile documents for information on the sources and methods utilized for calculations represented in the presented data. Links to the 2011-2016 Agria breed profiles will be added to the Pedigreed dogs database. You can view a list of breeds and available insurance data here: Agria breed profiles - 2006-2011 and 2011-2016 - DogWellNet.pdf Click the following link for an overview of the Agria Updated Dog Breed Statistics from 2006-2011 (Description; Background Information and Hints on Interpretation): Description and Background to the Agria Updated Dog Breed Statistics 2006-2011.pdf. This information is also included in the downloadable file for each breed. Download an FAQ document for the Agria Dog Breed Statistics here: Agria Dog Breed Statistics FAQs.pdf a.m. 9-13-2019 - PLEASE NOTE: the 2011-2016 Agria breed profile file links shown in the table below are currently available only by special permission. Stay tuned for further details regarding access! Or make a request to info@ipfdogs.com. Breed Name 2006 – 2011 (122 breeds) 2011-2016 (188 breeds) Affenpinscher: 2011-2016 Afghan Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Airdale Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Akita: 2011-2016 Alaskan Husky: 2011-2016 Alaskan Malamute: 2011-2016 American Akita: 2011-2016 American Bulldogg: 2011-2016 American Cocker Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 American Staffordshire Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Cattledog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Kelpie: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Shepherd: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Australian Terrier: 2011-2016 Basenji: 2011-2016 Basset Artésien Normand: 2011-2016 Basset Fauve De Bretagne: 2011-2016 Basset Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Beagle: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bearded Collie: 2011-2016 Beauceron: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bedlington Terrier: 2011-2016 Bernese Mountain Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bichon Frise: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bichon Havanais: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bolognese: 2011-2016 Border Collie: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Border Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Borzoi: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Boston Terrier: 2011-2016 Bouvier des Flandres: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Boxer: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Briard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Brittany Dog: 2011-2016 Bull Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Bullmastiff: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cairn Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cane Corso: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cardigan & Pembroke Welsh Corgi: 2011-2016 Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Chihuahua: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Chinese Crested: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Chow Chow: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Cocker Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Collie Rough: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Collie Smooth: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Coton de Tuléar: 2011-2016 Curly Coated Retriever: 2011-2016 Dachshunds Miniature: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dachshunds Standard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dalmatian: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Danish-Swedish Farmdog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dobermann: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dogo Argentino: 2011-2016 Douge de Bordeaux: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Drever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Dutch Shepherds: 2011-2016 East Siberian Laika: 2006-2011 2011-2016 English Bulldog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 English Pointer: 2011-2016 English Setter: 2006-2011 2011-2016 English Springer Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Eurasian: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Finnish Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Finnish Lapphund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Finnish Spitz: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Flat Coated Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Fox Terriers: 2006-2011 2011-2016 French Bulldog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 German Hunting Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 German Pointers: 2006-2011-long haired, 2006-2011-short haired, 2006-2011-wire haired 2011-2016 German Shepherd Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 German Spitz Klein: 2011-2016 German Spitz Mittel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Golden Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Gordon Setter: 2011-2016 Great Dane: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Great Pyrenees: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Greater Swiss Mountain Dog: 2011-2016 Greyhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Griffons: 2011-2016 Groenendael: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Halleforshund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Hamilton Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Hovawart: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Hungarian Vizsla Shorthair: 2011-2016 Icelandic Sheepdog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Irish Red Setter: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Irish Terrier: 2011-2016 Irish Wolfhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Italian Greyhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Jack Russell Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Japanese Chin: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Japanese Spitz: 2011-2016 Karelian Bear Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Keeshond: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Kerry Blue Terrier: 2011-2016 King Charles Spaniel: 2011-2016 Kooiker Hound: 2011-2016 Kromfohrländer: 2011-2016 Kuvasz: 2011-2016 Labrador Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Lagotto Romagnolo: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Lakeland Terrier: 2011-2016 Lancashire Heeler: 2011-2016 Landseer: 2011-2016 Lapponian Herder: 2011-2016 Leonberger: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Lhasa Apso: 2011-2016 Löwchen: 2011-2016 Malinois: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Maltese: 2011-2016 Mastiff: 2011-2016 Miniature Bull Terrier: 2011-2016 Miniature Pinscher: 2011-2016 Mixed Breed: 2011-2016 Münsterländer Small: 2011-2016 Newfoundland: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norfolk terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norrbottenspitz: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norwegian Buhund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norwegian Elkhound Grey: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Norwegian Lundehund: 2011-2016 Norwich Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Old English Sheepdog: 2011-2016 Papillon: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Parson Russell Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Pekingese: 2011-2016 Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Phalene: 2011-2016 Pinscher: 2011-2016 Plott: 2011-2016 Polish Lowland Sheepdog: 2011-2016 Pomeranian: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Poodle Miniature: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Poodle Standard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Poodle Toy: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Portuguese Water Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Pug: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Puli: 2011-2016 Pumi: 2011-2016 Pyrenean Sheepdog: 2011-2016 Rhodesian Ridgeback: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Rottweiler: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Russian Toy: 2011-2016 Salukis: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Samoyed: 2011-2016 Schapendoes: 2011-2016 Schiller Hound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Schipperke: 2011-2016 Schnauzers Giant: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Schnauzers Miniature: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Schnauzers Standard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Scottish Deerhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Scottish Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Shar Pei: 2011-2016 Shetland Sheepdog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Shiba: 2011-2016 Shih Tzu: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Siberian Husky: 2011-2016 Slovensky Kopov: 2011-2016 Smålands Hound: 2011-2016 Small Brabant Griffon: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Spanish Water Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 St Bernhard: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Stabyhoun: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Staffordshire Bull Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish Elkhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish Lapphund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish Vallhund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swedish White Elkhound: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Swiss Hounds: 2011-2016 Tervueren: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Tibetan Mastiff: 2011-2016 Tibetan Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Tibetan Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Volpino Italiano: 2011-2016 Wachtelhund: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Weimaraner: 2011-2016 Welsh Springer Spaniel: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Welsh Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 West Highland White Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016 West Siberian Laika: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Whippet: 2011-2016 White Swiss Shepherd Dog: 2006-2011 2011-2016 Yorkshire Terrier: 2006-2011 2011-2016
  2. Once again our IPFD friend and collaborator Ian Seath has come out with a thought provoking but practical article. In BREED HEALTH AT THE START OF A NEW DECADE – WHAT’S YOUR VISION FOR 2030? on the DOG-ED: SOCIAL ENTERPRISE site, Ian does several things: Makes it personal - by sharing what he himself is doing - as a breeder, as chair of the Dachshund Breed Council in the UK, as the leader of the Breed-Specific Health Strategies theme at the IPFD International Dog Health Workshops (IDHW). In the description of his efforts, he provides great information on the process and structure of building health strategies for any breed, and he shows himself and the Dachshund groups in the UK as role models for other breed clubs. And he credits others who are doing good work. He 'walks the walk' (definition: 'to show that something is true by your actions rather than your words'). I know Ian well, and he is not doing this for personal acclaim. He passionately cares about the health and well-being of dogs - all breeds - and he does everything he can to say to all of us - "C'mon... we can do this!!" Ian challenges everyone to look ahead to 2030 and to seriously consider how what they are doing will impact the breed over that period. And he says: "It’s that time of year when New Year Resolutions have either already been forgotten or are well on the way to become good habits." I would encourage everyone to do as he says and to look ahead - not just breed club health committees but individual breeders, judges, veterinarians, researchers, owners... all stakeholders in the dog world. Too often we look to others to take responsibility... too often we give up because we don't see the potential for change (or just think it is too much work). And I would also like to stress the mention of good habits. It isn't just about knowing, it is about doing. Saying one thing and doing another is a very bad habit. I will risk offending you by suggesting some examples, all in the spirit of improving the health, well-being and welfare of dogs over the next 10 years. Health committees, breeders, individuals say: 'We want healthy, long-lived dogs!'. But do their health programs, recommendations and ACTIONS! truly reflect that goal? If the tendency is to select for the physical characteristics that are being rewarded in the show ring... you are not going to just accidentally get health and longevity... in fact, it's more likely you will get the opposite. Every individual breeder's decisions impact the whole breed! In another blog I described an interactive session at the Canadian Kennel Club genetics symposium, where a breeder, after listening to Dr. Kari Ekenstedt and I talk about many issues, including inbreeding, wanted us to specify 'what level of inbreeding was ok?'. In other words, sure, father X daughter was out... but what was okay? I challenged her to consider why she wanted to do inbreeding? Was it because she thought this would improve health and longevity in the breed? Almost undoubtedly it was not - it was to as quickly as possible achieve 'a look'. We all need to think about the big picture. Veterinarians - what are you doing within your practice, one on one to stop the normalization of health issues - genetic and otherwise? Do you make clear to your devoted owners of brachycephalic dogs that snorting and snuffling and bug eyes are not 'cute' or 'funny' but serious concerns? Do you work hard to counteract the rampant obesity problem in pets? No, your clients may not want to hear the messages... but what is your personal responsibility? Pet industry - are you focusing your marketing to profile healthy dogs... or still using challenged but popular breeds? So, at IPFD we continue to promote international efforts on the challenges for dogs; we work to bring together stakeholder groups and organizations that can undertake actions and make decisions that can impact the dog world in beneficial ways. But I urge people to read and hear the messages in Ian's article - at both a group and individual level. As he says, echoing the wide focus of the 4th IDHW in Windsor, "The final element in making progress is engagement with breeders, owners and buyers. They are the primary groups whose behaviour needs to be influenced if the plans are to be implemented. There are others to engage with (e.g. vets, KC, researchers, judges) but taking action on both the supply and demand side of the dog population is essential." I am an impatient person... 10 years is too long to wait for an improvement! But I know how fast it goes. Get going on those good habits for dog health so that when Ian writes another article you can say, with great honesty: 'Yes sir! I am doing my bit!'
  3. This blog is going to be a little different. Still about health and well-being... but this time about veterinarians and the veterinary community. Many of you may not realize that every veterinary conference now has a major stream on the well-being of veterinarians, themselves. On self-care, and caretaker fatigue, and mental health. And on suicide prevention. You may not have seen this Time article: Veterinarians Face Unique Issues That Make Suicide One of the Profession's Big Worries, but these challenges are an increasing priority for veterinary associations over recent years. Issues like depression, anxiety and burnout build on crippling debt for many graduates. Unfortunately, there are many more articles on this topic. When I graduated - many years ago - vets were at the top of the lists of most respected and trusted professions. That status has diminished. I don't want to go into all the reasons, but I will say this. Years ago when someone would ask what I did and I would say I was a vet, I heard nothing but accolades, and heartfelt thanks, and people telling me they had wanted to be a vet. It was humbling and gratifying. These days when it comes up, the first thing I hear is 'Do you know how much I had to pay for my last vet bill?' or worse. There are a lot of changes in the veterinary practice world, and I can say I am not sorry to be off the front lines. There are lots of frustrations for consumers as well. The majority of vets are devoted to being in the profession and to the animals and people they serve. Unfortunately, the stresses that go beyond the care of animals are simply insurmountable to some. A former graduate student recently contacted me; she is a practice owner and committed to supporting her colleagues, especially the newer ones. She was shocked at a recent support meeting to hear that the majority of veterinarians in that group had, at some point, considered suicide. All health professions struggle with such issues because our work is intense. But the rise in concerns in veterinary medicine are beyond troubling. As is the fact that there is a need for this site: 'Not One More Vet'. I wanted to let you know that the veterinary community has recognized this as a major priority. The VMX meeting (formerly NAVC) is a massive conference at which I have spoken on numerous occasions. Today another former student shared this link on my personal facebook page... and it prompted me to pass it along with these personal comments. A Poem for the Veterinary Community - performed by Andrea Gibson, an American Poet at VMX 2020. Please have a listen to this powerful and heartfelt message. I know many of you will identify with it. What is important to understand is just how desperately many veterinarians in practice need to hear that they are appreciated. If any of you are motivated to reach out to a veterinarian who has helped you and your beloved animals, to acknowledge anyone on the clinic team ... please do so; don't hesitate. In spite of all the challenges for clients of veterinarians these days... we might all agree that the world is better place with veterinarians than without them. For any vets reading this, always ask your colleagues how they are doing and if they need help. And if you are a vet who needs support, your veterinary community has resources - please reach out.
  4. Kyle Snowden, DVM, provides information on brachycephalic anatomy and discusses its impacts on breathing and thermo-regulation. Veterinary interventions used to correct problematic issues in compromised dogs are covered. Also see: DWN's International Actions: Extremes of Conformation
  5. "It is recognised that, as in society at large, there are different attitudes towards different animal uses amongst veterinary professionals. It will be necessary to build consensus based on effective consultation and democratic decision-making, utilising a shared working definition of animal welfare and widespread recognition of the veterinary profession as an animal welfare-focused profession. This strategy lays out these principles, developed through consultation."
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