Jump to content
International Collaboration For Dog Health And Welfare. Join Us.

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'welfare'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • About IPFD
    • About Us
    • IPFD Board
    • DogWellNet.com Digest
    • IPFD News
    • IPFD in the Media
    • More on DogWellNet.com
    • More on our Partners and Collaborators
    • Disclaimers & Policies
    • Press
  • Hot Topics
    • Brachycephalics
    • Antimicrobial Resistance / Prudent Use of Antibiotics
  • IPFD International Dog Health Workshops
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshop #4
    • IPFD International Dog Health Workshop #3
    • 2nd International Dog Health Workshop
    • 1st International Dog Health Workshop
  • Health and Breeding
    • Breed-Specific Approaches
    • Health and Screening Tests
    • Breeding
    • Breeds
  • Population Data on Dogs, Health and Disease
    • Sources of Population Data
    • General Principles
    • Breed Club Health Surveys
    • Disease | Condition-Specific Articles
  • Welfare
    • Welfare and Health
    • Sourcing and Commercial Breeding
    • Dog-Specific Legislation and Programs
    • Human-Dog Interactions
  • Education
    • Education for Judges
    • Education for Youth
    • Education for Veterinary Professionals
    • Education of Consumers and the Public
    • Education of Breeders
  • Research
  • HGTD Quality Database
  • HGTD Genetic Counselling
  • International Actions

Categories

  • Pedigreed Breeds
  • Additional Breed Resources
  • Native Breeds

Categories

  • Partners and Sponsors
    • Contributing Partners
    • Collaborating Partners
    • Sponsors

Categories

  • Quick Start
  • Your Account
  • Navigation
  • Participating in the Community
  • Using the DogWellNet Forums
  • Technical Issues

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Regulations
    • Government Regulations
    • Kennel Club Regulations
  • Swedish Insurance Data
  • Swedish Breeding Strategy (RAS) Documents (English Summary)
  • Breed-Specific Documents
  • Welfare and Health
    • Health Conditions
  • Breed Club Health Surveys
  • Breeding
  • Behaviour / Temperament
  • IDHW Files
    • 1st IDHW
    • 2nd IDHW
    • IPFD IDHW #3
    • 4th IDHW
  • Shared Educational and Event Resources
    • General
    • Education of Consumers and Public
    • Education for Breeders
  • Peer Reviewed Research Articles
  • PUBLIC Logos and Style Guides
  • Finnish Breeding Strategy (JTO) documents (English Summary)
  • Norwegian Breeding Strategies - English Summaries
  • The Kennel Club Breed Health Conservation Plan

Media Categories

  • IPFD Videos
  • Brachycephalics
  • Behaviour and Training
  • Canine Genetics
  • Health and Welfare

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Region


Location


Country


Current Affiliation


Position / Title


Interests


Expertise/Proficiencies


Other Information on Interests or Expertise


Specific Breed(s) of Interest


Breed Club / Health Committee Name and URL


Theme attended at 3rd IDHW in Paris

Found 69 results

  1. A presentation by Chris Laurence MBE to the 2013 AWF Discussion Forum. Part of a session exploring what happened next to issues discussed at the Forum from 2006 - 2012. This video offers a historical perspective of animal welfare issues in the UK. A complete group of AWF/BVA videos in the Discussion Forum is at: https://www.youtube.com/user/BVAAWF/videos The videos cover many species; dog's/companion animal's welfare concerns are included in some of the talks. Also see AWF's website: https://www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk/
  2. The reality of sourcing – national vs. registered/ pedigree populations; commercial breeding: the reality; new developments in health and welfare management, e.g. in the USA and Ireland; ‘rescues’ / marketing; the role of different stakeholders.
  3. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    excerpts... Main Areas of Concern Definitions and Clarifications, “Sustainable supply of dogs” Dog Traceability –Numbers and Origins Social Media / Online Presence Legislation Key Actions... “Human Behaviour Change”
  4. Version 1.0.0

    7 downloads

    Tamzin Furtado's presentation from the 4th International Dog Health Workshop considers how human behaviours affect welfare. "There are good reasons why we should better understand human behaviour: It’s the root cause of most welfare issues– people doing, or not doing, certain care, management or training practices. It can help campaigns and work with clients (vets, trainers) to improve compliance, rapport and efficiency. We are used to considering animal behaviour, what about the human animal?"
  5. The "Study on the welfare of dogs and cats involved in commercial practices" identified five main areas of concern which could potentially place at risk the welfare and the health of dogs and cats. This report became available in 2015... the subject matters covered in the report remain topics of concern still today... May 2019, the Finnish Kennel Club's news... https://www.kennelliitto.fi/en/about-us/news/finnish-kennel-clubs-objectives-european-parliament-election "The Finnish Kennel Club’s objectives for the next mandate of the European Parliament promote responsible dog trade, improve the conditions for monitoring welfare of dogs and intensify the control of antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases." Annexes to the "Study on the welfare of dogs and cats involved in commercial practices" contain data (ANNEX 3. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DATA: CASE STUDY MEMBER STATES).
  6. Our colleagues at Human Behaviour Change for Animals posted this on their Facebook page: "Fantastic work exploring the demand for rhino horn with the aim of creating campaigns with messaging that is more likely to work than current messaging. At HBCA we believe that it is vital that we don't make assumptions about why people do or don't do things and that we find out for ourselves so we enjoyed reading this article and the papers it links to." And directed us to: We asked people in Vietnam why they use rhino horn. Here’s what they said. (Image: Malaysia’s wildlife department seized 50 African rhino horns destined for Vietnam last year. EPA-EFE/FAZRY ISMAIL) As I read it I noticed parallels to challenges with human behaviour change in dogs. Words like: deeply held beliefs... status... and focus on personal wants and needs and not what consumers consider 'remote' issues. From the article: "Our findings shed light on why current campaigns against rhino horn purchases aren’t working. For example, they tend to highlight the plight of rhinos, suggest that rhino horn doesn’t have medicinal properties or emphasize the legal consequences of purchasing it. ... From our research it’s clear that people who buy rhino horn won’t be won over by any of these arguments." As the authors suggest... in order for education efforts to make a difference - actually change outcomes - "[campaigns] must be "better informed about the values associated with the use of rhino horn and that target the most prevalent types of uses." I would suggest that we can cross out rhino horn and write in any number of current controversial issues in the dog world and take this as good advice. To become 'better informed' we must listen to each other and not impose our perception of the important issues or compelling arguments onto others if we want to be effective. Many of us are thinking about these issues as we approach the 4th IDHW in Windsor, UK, later this month. See, e.g. Ian Seath's latest blog: We need to stop trying to change people’s minds!
  7. Love is Blind is a joint initiative of the Australian Veterinary Association and the RSPCA: "We’re raising public awareness about the animal welfare problems caused by exaggerated physical features such as brachycephaly, short limbs and excessive skin wrinkling, and how these problems can be prevented." This campaign stresses many of the issues in international work being presented on DogWellNet.com and the work - building on previous Workshops - that will happen at the imminent 4th International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW), in Windsor, UK, 30 May - 01 June, 2019. Including: The challenges of the brachycephalic breeds need to be understood by current AND future owners, breeders, veterinarians, kennel and breed clubs and other stakeholders, All these groups need to work together for the benefit of individual dogs and the breeds. The material suggests actions needed to be taken by each of these groups, including attention to sourcing of dogs, breeding, showing and more. Resources: See the Australian Love is Blind homepage for links to material, including several videos explaining the increased susceptibility of these dogs to heat and providing practical advice for owners. We have recently posted on Facebook a video entitled 'The Purebred Crisis' that describes this campaign, interviews veterinarians, owners and a breeder-judge. This video highlights the very different attitudes and perceptions for various individuals. It is this variation in opinion and approach to these dogs that complicates efforts to improve health and welfare in these breeds. I have discussed this in previous blogs. There is no question that people are attracted and deeply attached to these dogs that have, as the Aussies say, "squishy faces", and that they have delightful personalities. However, it is also clear that some owners do not realize the health and welfare challenges in these breeds. One of the themes at the 4th IDHW is effective communication, and we need to use all available tools and knowledge from experts in order to change human behaviour - to not only educate people but also to encourage collaboration. See more in Brenda's blogs, including: French Bulldog Health Seminar October 2018 Breeding: A Moral Choice? and: 4th International Dog Health Workshop Pre-Meeting Resources, for example: 4th IDHW Theme #5: Exaggerations and Extremes in Dog Conformation And this previous post on DogWellnet.com: Love is Blind - Dr Philip Moses
  8. Thanks to Kevin Colwill for his thoughtful piece entitled "Breeding: Is it a moral choice" in the Our Dogs Newspaper and thanks to both for permission to reproduce here. In this concise yet thought-provoking article Kevin discusses his thoughts on the question: When it comes to breeding pedigree dogs, how much is too much and how far is going too far? Some points worth considering: Issues in extreme breeds reflect on all breeders. Certainly, negative attention in the media moves quickly from one particular issue or breed and soon expands to include all pedigreed dogs; Beyond that, legislation meant to address specific problems/breeds may result in broad restrictions on breeding - and often undesirable and unfortunate (even for the dogs) consequences. Although he says "Each breed is its own unique little, or not so little, community" and implies that trying to make blanket decisions for the massive diversity of breeds presents challenges. However, he is also saying that many issues, especially ethical ones, should apply across all breeds and breeding and cannot be left to e.g. individual breed clubs. The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD) is founded on the principal that although individuals may operate within a limited community - local or national - dogs and dog breeding are a global phenomenon and many challenges must be considered and addressed with an international - and multi-disciplinary - perspective. "Breed clubs aren’t defending the time-honoured look of the breed. They’re defending a relatively modem interpretation of how their breed should look." Here he is debunking the claims of some that extreme dogs must look the way they do to preserve the history and traditional of the breed, when, in fact, many/most breeds were originally both more moderate and more diverse in appearance. His suggestion that "the KC must be much more hard¬nosed in confronting breed clubs and insisting on change." Many KCs and breed clubs, especially throughout Europe are confronting the issues head-on. However, there seems to be resistance from breeders, judges and others. Support from the broader community of breeders to implement change is needed. For many years, lecturing about breed-specific issues in dogs, even before the existence of IPFD, in discussions with the breeding community, veterinarians and others, it was becoming self-evident that if concerns were not addressed by the dog community, society would likely impose 'solutions' on them. This is coming to fruition in many areas, and society and the media wants to move at a much faster pace than many in the pedigreed dog world. I think Kevin Colwill's call to action by KCs, and all ethical breeders - not limited to those in specifically affected breeds - is timely and important to consider. PDF version - Breeding-is it a moral choice - PDF.pdf
  9. Among the presenters at The First International Conference on Human Behaviour Change for Animal Welfare held in Dorking, Surrey, UK from September 19-21st was IPFD's Dr. Brenda Bonnett.
  10. Article: Vet Times Coalition campaign to help promote welfare needs to pet owners Leading veterinary organisations have launched a joint campaign to help owners better understand the complexities of their pet’s five welfare needs. See more about the Coalition Campaign - actions plans have been developed based on Survey results found in the PDSA Paw reports - latest report 2017... Need help to Choose the Right Pet - Client Booklet for Vets Resource - See more on the campaign and PDSA below
  11. 2019 - Denmark - Publisher: Companion Animal Group, Danish Veterinary Association Antibiotic Use Guidelines for Companion Animal Practice (2nd ed)
  12. Following on from my blog on the Seminar for the FBDCA we are thrilled to find that the French Bulldog Club of England has shared their Breed Health and Conservation Plan (BHCP). Link here; PDF attached, below. These plans are being assembled by the health team at The Kennel Club, until recently spearheaded by Katy Evans (now the Jane H. Booker Chair in Canine Genetics at The Seeing Eye in the USA). Similar to coverage in my talk (video link here), the focus is very broad in the BHCP and makes clear the challenges ahead for this breed, internationally. The BHCP incorporates statistics from Sweden and Britain, from our IPFD Partners Agria Pet Insurance/Agria Djurförsäkring and VetCompass. Work like the BHCPs in the UK, Breed-specific Breeding Strategies from Sweden (RAS) and Finland (JTO) and others will be incorporated into our new development, the IPFD Health Strategy Database for Dogs (HSDD) coming soon. Then we will be able to provide an interactive resource where 'all' health information can be accessed to inform the great efforts being made by groups throughout the world. Congrats and thanks to The KC and the French Bulldog Club of England. breed_health_and_conservation_plan_-_french_bulldog_final__1_.pdf
  13. This is a translation of an article by Åsa Linholm which will appear in the Swedish Kennel Club magazine: Hundsport Special nr 2:2016. Introduction: The hottest topic in the Swedish dog world in summer of 2015 has been brachycephalic (flat-faced) dogs and their health. In February 2016 the Swedish Kennel Club arranged a conference on the subject, an arrangement that was right in time, but in fact was planned since 2014.
  14. There is a steady stream of articles / work / initiatives coming in relative to those brachy breeds identified as highest risk for health and welfare issues. Coming from KCs - e.g. SKK... (See the background of and supportive documentation for this NKU project below...) the Mops Club, Netherlands... See the recent discussion of main features of the BALV (outcross, approval and stricter breeding rules) and communication with government and other KC's... and from the veterinary sector ... e.g. FECAVA... ‘Extreme breeding’ of companion animals: Raising public awareness is key In general, the work is based on scientific evidence. Of course, some of the initiatives (measurements etc) are 'new' and not yet fully proven in efficacy for what is proposed. Regardless of the basis, these proposal evoke extreme emotional and even personal responses (e.g. FB, confrontations and disagreements, etc.). Because... at heart these issues relate to a seemingly widespread human attraction to 'extremes'. We are happy to also present excellent articles on avoidance of extremes in other breeds - e.g. Dachshunds and Rottweilers. Clearly, we need not only an evidence-based approach to deal with these issues, but also innovative communication strategies to effect change in human behaviours and attitudes. Background information Brachycephalic projects by the Nordic Kennel Union's affiliated Kennel Clubs is available at: 2018 - SKK's work for brachycephalic health Of particular interest are project planning documents put together by the NKU's Working group and SKK. These documents outline health and welfare issues and offer proposed actions, definitions, parameters and procedures for evaluation of dogs. 1. STATEMENTS AND PROPOSALS REGARDING RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN BRACHYCEPHALIC DOGS Internal link: NKU STATEMENTS AND PROPOSALS REGARDING RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN BRACHYCEPHALIC DOGS.pdf ADDITIONAL INFO... 2. REVEALING THE PHENOTYPIC AND GENOTYPIC VARIATION IN FOUR BRACHYCEPHALIC BREEDS (SKK) As part of the work to combat breathing problems in brakycephalics, the Swedish Kennel Club has started a project to inventory the health status in four dog breeds: Boston Terrier, English Bulldog, French Bulldog and Pug. excerpts... ♦ All these topics - extremes, breed and communication will be a focus in the 4th IDHW.... ♦
  15. I was honored to address the French Bulldog Club of America at their National Specialty in Louisville, KY on October 31st, 2018. The invitation came from the Health & Genetics Committee of the French Bull Dog Club of America (FBDCA). This invitation was prompted by my presentation on the IPFD Harmonization of Genetic Testing initiative at the AKC-CHF Health Conference in St. Louis in August 2017. Jan Grebe, Calvin Dykes and the others on the Committee stressed that the "club is dedicated to Frenchie health, and the harmonization project will be an invaluable resource for breeders". The final presentation, following discussions with the committee, reflected various issues impacting the breed - and I complement the FBDCA on their interest in health and welfare of their breed and in both a national and international perspective. French Bulldogs are challenged by issues including alarming increase in numbers, health concerns related to the brachycephalic condition and scrutiny by veterinary and regulatory groups throughout the world. The FBDCA video-taped the presentation and we have made this available here. It was quite an experience to be in a hotel with about 300 French Bulldogs. The incredible commitment and attachment that Frenchie owners have for these dogs was very evident. I was excited to see information and videos on the increased interest in performance activities for this breed. What a great way to identify and highlight those dogs who are healthy and active. See other relevant resources on brachycephalic issues internationally and coverage of these issues from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop (IDHW) in our discussion paper. More international actions for health and welfare will undoubtedly be forthcoming following the 4th IDHW in May, in the UK.
  16. View IPFD Board member Patricia Olson's presentation at The Role of Clinical Studies for Pets with Naturally Occurring Tumors in Translational Cancer Research: A Workshop (June, 2015) Best-practices for conduct of clinical trial for animal patients Also see the PDF... http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Activity Files/Disease/NCPF/2015-JUN-8/Olson.pdf Other presentations from the workshop are available. http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/Disease/NCPF/2015-JUN-08/Day 2 Videos/Session 6 Videos/28-Olson-Video.aspx See: Dr. Mathew Breen's presentation which elaborates on the powerful opportunity possible with identification of genetic factors in the dog contributing to advancing cancer research in humans and Dr. Heidi Parker's - Canine Cancer Genomics
  17. Purdue's Center for Animal Welfare Science The CAWS Project aim is "to help the US pet industries address the socio-ethical and scientific (well-being) concerns embedded in commercial dog breeding. With the support of dog breeders, pet industry representatives, animal health and welfare experts, and other key stakeholders, the researchers are developing and testing voluntary standards for the care and well-being of dogs in commercial breeding facilities." Establishing science-based standards for the care and welfare of breeding dogs...
  18. I have frequently heard people say that what they are doing is 'for the dogs'' when it might seem it is mainly for their own goals.- but the Swedish Kennel Club has posted an informative video about the Breed Specific Instructions that makes it clear that the only goal with this program is to promote the health and welfare of dogs. Renowned judges explain why they think their role in promoting health and welfare is so important. We have lots of information on the BSI and the Swedish Breed-Specific Breeding Strategies, in general (as well as, lists of breeds with breed specific strategies from several countries on DogWellNet.com and this video really puts it all in perspective. We all know that health and welfare of dogs is the responsibility of all stakeholders in the dog world and judges are no exception. The impact of dog shows and the awarding of wins to specific dogs has a big impact on the public perception of pedigree dogs, in general, and also of specific breeds. It is crucial that dogs that achieve success in these increasingly 'prime time', public displays epitomize the best of the best - not just in looks, but also in health. All organizations licensing dog judges insist on 'judges education' but the BSI program takes it a step further, insisting that judges take responsibility in only promoting dogs without physical manifestations of conditions/ conformations that may limit health and welfare. The BSI process is followed in all Scandinavian countries, as well as several other European countries. A key part of the BSI process is the completion of reports by the judges (discussed in the video); and here is a link to an example of a report required for German Shepherd Dogs by Rad van Beheer in The Netherlands. The Canadian Kennel Club instituted an observer program in 2017, but I haven't found full details on the goals of the program. The AKC has a Field Rep program and, although at the moment I do not think these North American programs have breed-specific requirements similar to the BSI, clearly there are structures in place that could facilitate such an approach. A striking comment in the video was that judges must be on the lookout for negative trends and help ensure that these do not progress. I am not a judge; I briefly showed dogs in the distant past; and I am often concerned by what I see at show events. I was recently at the National Specialty of the French Bulldog Club of America in Louisville, KY, USA, at the end of October 2018. It was an honor to talk to the club members who are concerned about health issues in this breed. However, I was confused by seeing many dogs being shown that clearly had no actual tails (maybe 2 coccyx vertebrae), clearly so in the eyes of this veterinarian, and described as such by the competitors as a recent trend. And yet, I was repeatedly assured that 'the standard specifies that a French Bulldog must have a tail'. Such a contradiction, such an extreme, would presumably not be allowed, under the BSI, especially when this is not a cosmetic change, but a structural one. It is particularly concerning given that we know that French Bulldogs have an increased risk for spinal abnormalities and a new paper suggests that selection for screw tails may have led to a syndrome of abnormalities in both English and French Bulldogs. Every one who has bred dogs knows that focus on one characteristic, especially going for extremes, can lead to occurrence of unforeseen consequences. Nothing happens in isolation with breeding and selection. Congrats to the Swedes for this video and I hope it will encourage more judges to take an approach like this - regardless of whether or not they are under a requirement to do so. Because our activities really should be 'for the dogs' sake'.
  19. England: October 1st 2018: new Regulations replaced a number of existing licensing regimes involving activities related to dog ownership, management and dog breeding: selling animals as pets providing for or arranging for the provision of boarding for cats or dogs hiring out horses dog breeding keeping or training animals for exhibition For a look at the new regulations see... The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 Associated documents can be found here: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/486/resources. Among the associated documents are the "Explanatory Memorandum for THE ANIMAL WELFARE (LICENSING OF ACTIVITIES INVOLVING ANIMALS) (ENGLAND) REGULATIONS 2018: 2018 No. 486 " and the "Final Impact Assessment" which covers effects of these new regulations on the business and public sectors - both documents provide insights into issues and inconsistencies with previously existing regulations - which are addressed to one degree or another by the new Regulations. Statistics cited in the Final Impact Statement show how many licensed businesses are subject to the New Regulations. Dog Breeding comes in at 4,950. Under the new Regulations it is hoped that the Risk-based assessments for determining the length of time between business license renewals (1 up to 3 years) will result "in a shift towards more favourable practices by businesses in order to move into the lower and medium risk categories" - thereby reducing costs.
  20. "These guidelines are intended to assist companion animal veterinarians throughout the world in their understanding of contemporary animal welfare concepts and science, and provide guidance on addressing potential animal welfare problems, navigating some more common ethical issues, and promoting good animal welfare through effective communication , both within the veterinary clinic* and beyond."
  21. From the First International Conference on Human Behaviour Change for Animal Welfare Richard Casey: Using PetWise MOTs to Improve Animal Welfare What are PetWise Mots? https://www.pdsa.org.uk/education-centre/petwise-mot/what-are-petwise-mots Also see: Kelly Arthur's Blog post, Welfare Consultations to Improve Pet Wellbeing and Generate Revenue
  22. See Dr. Brenda Bonnett's presentation from the First International Conference on Human Behaviour Change for Animal Welfare. HBCAW website: www.hbcanimalwelfare.com All presentations from the conference are available from HBCAW's YouTube channel. Also see DWN's Human Dog Interactions Category.
  23. A terrific free educational resource for dog owners produced by The Kennel Club... An essential guide full of vital information and practical advice to help you train your puppy, such as house training, teaching basic commands, nutrition, behavioural management and much more.
  24. Health before looks -- Collaborative action is urgently needed to stop the practice of extreme breeding in dogs and cats This message was delivered to the European Parliament at an event organized by our Collaborating Partner the Federation of European Companion Animal Veterinary Associations (FECAVA) together with the EU Dog and Cat Alliance and the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe(FVE). (Download PDF below.) This event was "aimed at ending the unnecessary suffering of dogs and cats bred with exaggerated features such as flat faces, narrowed nostrils, skin folds and protruding eyes" and is part of the ongoing work, especially throughout Europe, to address health and welfare in brachycephalic breeds. The speakers represented the veterinary, welfare and breed organization perspectives on the issue. It was great to see this international, multi-stakeholder approach, similar to that we have promoted through the IPFD International Dog Health Workshops (IDHWs) and reflected in the many resources on the brachycephalic isssue on DogWellNet.com. Kristin Prestrud (a veterinarian from another of our Partners, the Norwegian Kennel Club) put into perspective that although there are wide variations across dog breeds in form and function, there should be defined limits for extremes, so that selective breeding does not compromise health or welfare. The challenge, raised at our IDHWs is that those limits are not clear nor consistent across regions and cultures; we need research and collaborative work to define those limits. As Prestrud, explained, for pedigree dogs breeding happens according to written breed standards - however those are often open to interpretation and may vary widely across countries. "“We love that dogs look cute, that they have some particular look that we love. And so, short legs have got shorter, heavy bodies got heavier, long coats got longer, loose skin got looser, long ears got longer and wrinkles more extended. Not in all cases, not in all breeds, but in several breeds.” And when breeders select really strongly for some traits and restrict genetic input from outside, there is always the risk of reducing genetic variation." The British Veterinary Association’s encouragement of data reporting of conformation altering surgery (and caesareans) - by veterinarians with the consent of owners - was described. Similar registers are underway in, e.g. Scandinavian countries. However, there are challenges to compliance with these programs and only time will tell whether they achieve the goal of determining the prevalence of dogs that need such surgery. Speakers also highlighted the role of veterinarians in this issue, saying, “we must be aware that there are a lot of vets who earn their money by doing this very expensive surgery." I was encouraged to see that the discussion by the politicians did not focus simply on legislation of breeding as being the best solution. They discussed the need to control the marketing of unregistered puppies and kittens, “the majority of which are on the internet and are totally without control” . It was estimated that over half of puppies In the Netherlands come from unsupervised sources and it may be as high as 90% for some breeds, e.g. the French Bulldog. One of the members of parliament suggested that "efforts would be better focused on reducing demand by making extreme breed animals unfashionable. “We have to make unhealthy bad conformation unfashionable, it has to stop.”" And, so, as has been discussed in much of our work, we come back to this fact: the challenges are about the people, more than the dogs, and successfully improving health and welfare of dogs needs an approach that addresses human-animal interactions, human attitudes and actions, and using techniques of education that are likely to result in human behaviour change. Addressing sourcing of dogs and communication for change will be two themes at the upcoming 4th IPFD IDHW in Old Windsor, UK, May 30-June 1 2019. Congratulations to FECAVA and their co-organizers for an important event and to the European Parliament for taking an interest in the health and welfare of dogs. Health before looks Collaborative action is urgently needed to stop the practice of extreme breeding in dogs and cats Download: European Parliament Event article by Parliament Magazine - 7-2018
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.