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  1.  

    bags.JPGThe stellar group of participants at the IPFD 3rd International Dog Health Workshop (3rd IDHW) came to collaborate and we really put them to work.  The attendees, who certainly engaged and challenged and stimulated each other, accomplished a lot and it seems they are going home extremely satisfied with the experience.  More importantly, the majority have committed to participate in specific actions, with clear objectives, goals, timelines and deliverables.  There is a clear potential for real momentum to carry us forward towards the 4th IDHW in the UK.  Our diligent efforts were assisted by candy bars courtesy Mars Veterinary ...  between those and lots of strong French coffee, we pulled it off!  

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    A huge shout out to the French Kennel Club (SCC) for putting on a well-organized event at a great venue.  The food was fantastic - thanks to Agria for sponsoring the breaks and lunches. The boat cruise on the Seine was extraordinary - thanks to Royal Canin ... more good food and wine with a panoramic view of the sites of Paris, including the amazing icon of the Eiffel Tour, complete with its delightful, hourly light-show.  

     

    More information soon on the topics, challenges and future plans in the days to come.  We will be posting material from speakers, posters, and break out sessions, and photographs as well as the detailed plans addressing breed-specific health strategies, behaviour and welfare implications of early socialization, exaggerations of conformation, the harmonization of genetic testing, education/ communication on appropriate use of antibiotics, and the need for numbers/ quantitative information.  There will be lots of outreach to stakeholders who weren't at the meeting; hopefully to further engage the wider dog community in this important work.

     

    Thanks to all those who contributed... from individual dog owners, breeders, breed club reps, kennel club advisors and executives, many veterinarians, researchers, corporate and industry people, welfare organisations ...  I feel like I am at the Academy Awards and will surely miss someone!  

     

    This was a diverse community united by a commitment to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of dogs and to promote the best in human-dog interactions.  It is an honour and privilege to be part of this devoted and passionate community.  The future looks bright for innovative and sustained international collaboration.

     

     

     

     

  2. IMG_7426.JPGThe 2017 International Dog Health Workshop in Paris was the culmination of my summer 2016 project entitled, "A Veterinarian's Role in the Ethics and Welfare of Breeding Dogs." I'm very grateful to have attended this workshop that featured ways we can work collaboratively to improve dog health and welfare. My project poster was displayed among many other interesting research projects. I was impressed by the diversity of attendees including dog owners, veterinarians, kennel club members, researchers, and many more!

     

    IMG_7427.JPGThe International Dog Health Workshop stands out to me among other conferences I've attended because it truly was a working meeting, rather than simply being presented in a lecture format. I left inspired to take action due to the creativity of my group and ideas generated during the meeting. Many thanks to the Behavior and Welfare theme facilitators, Dr. Patricia Olson and Ms. Caroline Kisko, and the group participants.

     

    The Behavior and Welfare theme was tasked to address early canine socialization and its influence on creating a suitable lifetime companion. We acknowledged that a more thorough literature search would be beneficial followed by research to address gaps we identify. Beyond research, our group also discussed the need for more positive marketing to the public to communicate the benefits of acquiring a well-socialized puppy.

     

    FullSizeRender 3.jpgA special thanks to the Skippy Frank Fund for making this project and trip possible. Also many thanks to my personal French translator and mom-extraordinaire, Lindi Dreibelbis, for accompanying me on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. What wonderful memories we made together in Paris. 

  3. The Finnish Kennel Club (FKC) has finished the protocol and the instructions for fitness (walk) testing of breeding dogs in brachycephalic breeds. The test is similar to the one used by the Dutch Kennel Club.

     

    Finnish test instructions have been developed by veterinarians doing research on BOAS. Their results concerning the Bulldog have already been published. The researchers are still continuing their research and testing Pugs and French Bulldogs, whose results will be published later.

     

    According to the Finnish guidelines, a dog gets an approved walk test result if he/she walks 1000 meters in 12 minutes or less, and recovers sufficiently from the walk within the recovery time. In the future, it is also possible to have different time limits for different breeds. The test result is failed if

    • The dog is, based on the veterinarian’s initial examination, showing signs of serious respiratory symptoms (including also severe hyperthermia).
    • The supervising veterinarian interrupts the test due to the dog’s serious respiratory symptoms.
    • The dog is not able to successfully complete the test and/or recover from it sufficiently within the required time.

    The FKC arranged the first pilot test in February, and the second pilot will be arranged in May. Also orientation for veterinarians will be held at that second pilot. After that, breed clubs are able to arrange the tests by their own.  The tests have to be carried out in accordance with the FKC's Guideline for walk tests, in order to get the test result recorded in the FKC breeding database.

     

    The FKC is following the development and use of different tests in other countries. It is also having close collaboration with the other Nordic Kennel Clubs on this subject. The aim is, in the long run, and with the help of accumulated experience, to develop the test further, to be as appropriate as possible.  

     

    All the information on the Finnish walk test can be found here.

  4. Published a few months ago, a study of Marsden et al. (2016) used whole sequence data of 90 canids to investigate the importance of population bottleneck, inbreeding and artificial selection of the health of the dog.

     

    In order to investigate this issue, the authors compared sequences from breed dogs, village dogs, and gray wolves, measuring (i) the proportion of amino acid changing variants, as an indicator of genetic load, and (ii) the number of Mendelian disease genes, considering genes already identified in dogs and human. Several interesting results were found.

     

    Based on their measurement of amino acid changing variants (corresponding in general to mutations with deleterious effects), it has been estimated that dogs carry between 2 and 3% more deleterious alleles than wolves, which is comparable to the genetic load in the non-African human population (around 1-3%). This seems surprising, as dog breeds may appear to have undergone more severe bottlenecks during their demographic history than human populations. Also, the authors found that bottlenecks during domestication and breed creation were more responsible of the current genetic load in dogs than recent inbreeding.

     

    On the other hand, it appears that genomic regions under selection (also called selective sweeps), were enriched in disease-related genes. This enrichment could be either explained by the fact that genes controlling artificially selected traits in dogs could also confer Mendelian diseases, or to a linkage between genomic regions where disease genes and genes under selection are.

     

    On the basis on these different results, the authors concluded that artificial selection incidentally reduced dog fitness. Also, given the fact that repeated population bottlenecks and small effective population size seemed to have more impact on accumulation of weakly deleterious variation than recent inbreeding (i.e., mating between close relatives), the focus should be more on maintaining large population size, than avoiding inbreeding.   

     

     

    Given the number of studies that showing the impact of recent inbreeding of fitness and selected traits in dog (Ólafsdóttir and Kristjánsson, 2008; Urfer, 2009, Leroy et al. 2014) or other domestic species (Leroy 2014), I would nevertheless disagree with this last recommendation. It would be therefore be interesting to investigate why the results of this genomic study differ from more phenotype-oriented ones. There are several potential explanations, one being that the traits investigated in those latter studies are under different genetic mechanisms that the one studied here. In any case, we may expect that further studies will confirm, refute or further clarify these first interesting results.

     

    References

    Leroy, G. 2014. Inbreeding depression in livestock species: review and meta-analysis. Animal Genetics 189, 177-182.

    Leroy G., Phocas F., Hedan B., Verrier E., Rognon X. 2015. Inbreeding impact on litter size and survival in selected canine breeds. The Veterinary Journal.

    Marsden, C. D., Ortega-Del Vecchyo, D., O’Brien, D. P., Taylor, J. F., Ramirez, O., Vilà, C., ... & Lohmueller, K. E. 2016. Bottlenecks and selective sweeps during domestication have increased deleterious genetic variation in dogs.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(1), 152-157.

    Ólafsdóttir, G.Á., Kristjánsson, T., 2008. Correlated pedigree and molecular estimates of inbreeding and their ability to detect inbreeding depression in the Icelandic sheepdog, a recently bottlenecked population of domestic dogs. Conservation Genetics 9, 1639-1641.

    Urfer, S.R., 2009. Inbreeding and fertility in Irish Wolfhounds in Sweden: 1976 to 2007. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 51, 21.

  5. IPFD People Out and About

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    patricianolson
    Latest Entry

    By patricianolson,

    IPFD Board Member Dr. Patricia Olson was the keynote speaker at the Inaugural One Health Program at Midwestern University on October 8, 2015 (Downer’s Grove, Illinois). 

    Midwestern University also has one of the newest veterinary schools in the U.S. (Phoenix, Arizona).  Physicians were paired with veterinarians to deliver lectures on obesity, pneumonia, osteochondritis dissecans and epilepsy.  Dr. Olson’s lecture was on collaborative research, using the clues from animals to help advance both human and animal health/welfare. 

    See the pdf of her thought-provoking talk here: 

     

     

     


     

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    Once a year, in October, the SKK Breeding Committee organizes a weekend course for

    breeding officials based on the book Dog breeding in theory and practice by Sofia Malm (SKK genetic expert) and Åsa Lindholm.

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    The Genetic Expert and The Breeding Consultant of the SKK Department for Breeding and Health are in charge of the course.

     

     

     

    The aim is to give breed clubs education and tools they need to work with breeding plans and breed-specific strategies.

     

     

     

    The contents of the course include basic genetics and guidance in how to conduct work at club level.

     

     

     

    There’s also a certain amount of self-directed studies.

     

     

     

     

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    Every other year, in April, this education is held specifically directed to hunting dog breed clubs.

     

     

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    On the podium:

    1st : Meisterhaus Signet Higher'N Higer ; Breed: Basenji ; Owner: Lise DURLOT and Dimitri HEBERT ; Breeder: Brenda CASSELL and Tad BOOKS

    2nd : Fall In Love Forest Ohara Of Bloom White ; Breed : Samoyede ; Owner: Mira MITKOVA ; Breeder: Elisabeth FAUCON

    3rd : Eternal Drago Of Nordic Forest ; Breed : Siberian Husky ; Owner and breeder: Valérie CHARNEAU

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    gallery_2_6_3978.thumb.png.c634dcbb47849In June of 2014, the OFA Board of Directors voted unanimously to become a founding member of the International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD). With the majority of the founding members made up of national kennel clubs, the OFA is somewhat unique as a non-profit foundation. So why the decision to support the IPFD as a founding member?
    Overwhelmingly, it was the commonality in the two organizations’ missions, and the belief that the OFA could both contribute to and benefit from the collaboration.
    The mission of the OFA is “to improve the health and well-being of companion animals through a reduction in the incidence of genetic disease.” The OFA achieves its mission through four specific objectives:

    • To collate and disseminate information concerning orthopedic and genetic diseases of animals.
    • To advise, encourage and establish control programs to lower the incidence of orthopedic and genetic diseases.
    • To encourage and finance research in orthopedic and genetic disease in animals.
    • To receive funds and make grants to carry out these objectives.

    The mission of the IPFD is to facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources to enhance the health, well-being and welfare of pedigreed dogs and all dogs worldwide.
    Most individuals involved in canine health understand that our issues are not constrained by borders. Internationally, we face the same challenges, whether breed specific health improvement strategies, discussions regarding phenotypic extremes, debates on genetic diversity within closed populations, harmonization of various health screening protocols, validation of genetic tests and laboratories, or the host of regulations which can impact dog breeders and animal welfare both positively and negatively.
    The OFA believes the IPFD and the new DogWellNet.com platform provides the first and best opportunity to advance early international discussions to a plan of action. We are pleased to be involved with the IPFD at its inception, look forward to working with the other members, and mostly look forward to our combined efforts leading to healthier dogs tomorrow.

  • Dog Health Workshop

    Pre/ Post-meeting resources
    Success!  Thanks to all for your participation and let's keep this good work going!
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  • Our Partners
    •  

      Mars Veterinary is a business unit of Mars Petcare, the world’s largest pet care provider. Their mission is to facilitate responsible pet care by enhancing the well-being and relationship between pets, pet owners, breeders, shelters and veterinarians through valuable insights into pets as individuals.

       

      IPFD Harmonization logo white Sm.jpg

      Mars Veterinary is a proud sponsor of IPFD's Harmonization of Genetic Testing for Dogs Initiative.

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • Suomen Kennelliitto (Finnish Kennel Club, in English) - Established in 1889, the Finnish Kennel Club is a nationwide expert organisation on canine matters. Its aim is to promote the breeding of pedigree dogs, support diverse dog-related activities and improve dog-keeping standards in Finland. FKC disseminates expert information and serves as a comprehensive lobbying organisation for Finnish and international dog activities.

       

      Website: http://www.kennelliitto.fi/en/home
      Finnish Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

    • Agria is one of the world’s leading animal insurers, specialising in small animal and equine insurance. Founded in Sweden over 120 years ago, Agria came to the UK in 2009 and is now a prominent feature of the UK pet insurance industry. In the UK, Agria insures cats, dogs and rabbits.

    • The SKK - Svenka Kennelklubben (Swedish Kennel Club, in English), is Sweden's largest organisation dedicated to dogs and dog owners. We represent the interests of our 300,000 members – first time dog owners, experienced breeders, hunters, dog lovers, puppy buyers, exhibitors, agility competitors and many more.

       

      Website: http://www.skk.se/en/
      Follow this link for the SKK Blog at DogWellNet

      Follow this link for more information on the Swedish Kennel Club including our organizational structure, code of ethics, and more.

    • Royal Canin is a global leader in pet health nutrition. In an industry that continues to adapt to popular trends in cat and dog food, our mission will remain the same; to constantly bring, through Health Nutrition and shared knowledge, the most precise nutritional solution for cats' and dogs' health nutrition needs, by building on constantly deepened scientific knowledge and Royal Canin's roots in the feline and canine professional networks.

    • The Norwegian Kennel Club (NKC) was founded in 1898, and is the largest organisation for dog owners in Norway.

       

      Website: http://web2.nkk.no/en/
      Norwegian Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

    • The Fédération Cynologique Internationale is the World Canine Organisation. It includes 92 members and contract partners (one member per country) that each issue their own pedigrees and train their own judges.

       

      The FCI has five sections: Europe, The Americas and the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific, Middle-East and Africa.

       

      Website: http://www.fci.be/en/Presentation-of-our-organisation-4.html

       

      FCI Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

       

    • The French Kennel Club - SOCIÉTÉ CENTRALE CANINE (SCC) - was founded in 1881 as a non-profit organization by dog fanciers aiming to replenish native dog breeds and to bring in and establish foreign ones as well. The Société Centrale Canine became soon the reference canine organization, being recognized as a public interest organization by decree of the Council of State in April 1914. The SCC is proud to be one of the founders of the FCI in 1911, together with the Kennel Clubs from Germany, Austria, Belgium and the Netherlands.

       

      Website: http://www.scc.asso.fr
      Follow this link for the French Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet

    • Agria Djurförsäkring (Agria Animal Insurance) is one of the world's leading animal insurers specialising in small animal and equine insurance. The company dominates Scandinavian pet insurance and has recognised the importance of working closely with the veterinary profession since insuring the first horse in 1890.

       

      Website:  http://www.agria.se/
      Agria Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

    • The VDH - Verband für das Deutsche Hundewesen (German Kennel Club in English) is the foremost organisation representing the interests of dog-owners throughout Germany – the first address to find out everything there is to know on the subject of life with dogs, on dog sports and on dog breeding. As an umbrella organisation for its 175 member clubs the VDH today represents more than 650,000 members.

       

      Website: http://www.vdh.de/en/home/
      VDH Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

       

      Also see the: Rasselexikon (BREEDOPEDIA) - http://www.vdh.de/welpen/rasse
      A comprehensive online reference of 343 breeds including a detailed description of each breed which covers the general appearance, the character, the history and coat. Some breed profiles contain a video presentation (in German). In addition: the Breedopedia includes addresses of VDH member clubs and breeders with VDH-seal of approval. The breed listing is alphabetical and a specific breed search function is available.

    • The Irish Kennel Club promotes the responsible ownership and breeding of dogs throughout Ireland through education, registration, training and support schemes and events.

       

      Website: http://www.ikc.ie/
      Irish Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

    • Founded and originally incorporated as a private not for profit foundation in 1966, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals will soon celebrate its 50th anniversary. Its initial mission: To provide radiographic evaluation, data management, and genetic counseling for canine hip dysplasia.

       

      While the OFA continues to focus on hip dysplasia, today’s OFA Mission, “To improve the health and well being of companion animals through a reduction in the incidence of genetic disease,” reflects the organization’s expansion into other inherited diseases and other companion animals such as cats.

       

      Website: http://www.ofa.org/index.html
      OFA Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -

    • The Kennel Club is the largest organization in the UK devoted to dog health, welfare and training. Its objective is to ensure that dogs live healthy, happy lives with responsible owners.

       

      Website: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk
      Kennel Club Blog at DogWellNet: - under construction -